State of illinois salaries

State of illinois salaries DEFAULT

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Illinois local government salary data is public record.

Cities

On June 9, 2011, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel's administration posted the salaries of every city employee to a public website in a bid to follow through on a campaign promise to bring transparency to government.[1] At $2.5 billion as of 2011, payroll was one of the largest expenses for the city as it battled a $650 million budget deficit. The data showed that 2,400 city workers were paid $100,000 or more per year.[1]

According to a payroll database compiled by the Illinois-based watchdog group Better Government Association, there were two employees earning more than $150,000 annually in Aurora in 2011.[2] The BGA database does not allow searches to be broken down by department, only last name or salary value.

  • City Treasurer Brian Caputo earned $159,411.20
  • Chief of Police Gregory Thomas earned $154,731.2
  • Mayor Tom Weisner earned $111,841.6
  • Assistant Chief of Staff Charles Nelson earned $98,966.40

Counties

Lake County's highest earner is the county administrator, who earned $222,547.27 in 2011.[3] The Cook County CEO earned $500,000 for the same year.[4] The chief financial officer of DuPage County earned $162,782.[5]

School districts

Teacher salaries

Below is a chart of the top 10 highest paid teachers in Illinois as of 2010.[6] Over 14,000 teachers in Illinois made over $100,000 a year as of 2010.[7]

Salary Subject Name School
$191,124 Physical Ed William Mitz Adlai E Stevenson High School
$189,219 English (9-12) James Liesz East Leyden High School
$187,278 Physical Ed Steven Heuerman Niles West High School
$184,449 Physical Ed Paul Parpet Addison Trail High School
$179,253 Graphic Design Archibald Loch Adlai E Stevenson High School
$177,263 Guidance Counselor David Bene Highland Park High School
$174,656 French Carolyn Dunoon East Leyden High School
$172,164 Physics Michael Wietlispach Hoffman Estates High School
171,595 Drama Susan Rothchild Lake Park High School

There is also a chart comparing salaries for the highest paid high school teachers to those of university professors:[8]

Subject Illinois High Schools Univ. of Illinois Main Campus
English$189,219$163,000
French$173,000$150,000
Physics$172,100$240,000
Math$169,700$185,000
Theater$167,500$102,000
Political Science$166,410$191,000
Music$165,400$136,000

Law enforcement

Chicago Police Department 2011 salaries:[9]

  • Superintendent of Police earned $310,000
  • Assistant Superintendent earned $188,316

The Illinois Senate passed a bill to repeal a provision in a 2007 pension law that would have allowed the former Oak Brook Chief of Police to collect a $750,000 annual pension, much higher than his final salary. The 2007 law included a one-time, six-month window that allowed former Oak Brook Police Chief Thomas Sheahan to transfer credits from a Municipal Employees’ Annuity and Benefit Fund of Chicago (MEABF) into the Sheriff's Law Enforcement Personnel program within the Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund (IMRF). Sheahan was to receive benefits based on one $77,000 pension, instead of two pensions that add up to $45,000 a year. Sheahan was the only person in the state to benefit from the provision.[10]

Fire departments

The Chicago Fire Deputy District Chief earned $134,868 and the District Chief earned $148,356.[11]

Salary articles

In 2011, Sunshine Review requested salary information from 19 local governments in the state.

Cities

Counties

School districts

Law enforcement

Fire

Salary records project

In 2011, Sunshine Review chose 152 local governments as the focus of research on public employee salaries. The editors of Sunshine Review selected eight states with relevant political contexts (listed alphabetically):

1. California
2. Florida
3. Illinois
4. Michigan
5. New Jersey
6. Pennsylvania
7. Texas
8. Wisconsin

Within these states, the editors of Sunshine Review focused on the most populous cities, counties and school districts, as well as the emergency services entities within these governments. The purpose of this selection method was to develop articles on governments affecting the most citizens.

The salary information garnered from these states were a combination of existing online resources and state Freedom of Information Act requests sent out to the governments.

A study published by the Pew Charitable Trusts and the Economy League of Greater Philadelphia said the city of Philadelphia faced challenges owing to the cost of public employee pensions.[12] The report claimed the amount that Philadelphia paid to pension recipients limited the city’s ability to use its budget effectively.

The report said there were more individuals receiving pension benefits—33,907 claimants in 2006—than workers in the city—28,701.[12] The authors recommended three steps towards addressing the problem of high costs in pensions: improved data collection, expanded transparency initiatives, and reductions to the city's overall budget.[12]

Salary schedules can be published as ranges, not as specific compensation figures, and may leave out compensation received through health and retirement benefits, as well as benefits such as commuter allowances and cell phone reimbursements. This project aimed to close the gap and provide a more accurate picture of public employee salaries for the sake of public education and transparency.

External links

  • “Employee State Salaries”, Pantagraph.com, 2010
  • “Better Government Payroll Database”, Better Government Association, 2010(dead link)
  • “Salary Request”, State of Illinois Comptroller
  • “Robbing Peter to Pay Paul: A Closer Look at Public Employee Pay”, Illinois Policy Institute, 2010
  • “Illinois State Payroll Database”, STLtoday.com, 2009
  • “Teacher Salary Database”, Family Taxpayers Foundation, 2010
  1. 1.01.1"Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel Releases Salary Information for Every City Employee," ABC News, June 9, 2011
  2. ↑Better Government Association, Payroll Database, July 21, 2011(dead link)
  3. ↑Lake County employee salaries
  4. ↑Cook County employee salaries
  5. ↑DuPage County employee salaries
  6. Champion News, 2010 Top 100 Teacher Salaries, Dec, 2010(dead link)
  7. American Thinker, Let's hear it for the 'working class' teachers of Illinois!, March 14, 2011
  8. Carpe Diem, Highest paid teachers in Illinois: High School vs. College, By Discipline, Dec. 16, 2010
  9. ↑Chicago Police Department, Illinois
  10. ↑Daily Herald, Senate targets former Oak Brook chief’s pension, May 26, 2012
  11. ↑Chicago Fire Department, Illinois
  12. 12.012.112.2'’Philadelphia’s Quiet Crisis: The Rising Cost of Employee Benefits, Pew Charitable Trusts and the Economy League of Greater Philadelphia, January 23, 2008
Sours: https://ballotpedia.org/Illinois_local_government_salary

Right-sizing Illinois state government’s payrolls

It’s almost impossible for Illinois taxpayers to know if they are paying a fair price when it comes to goods and services provided by the state-government workforce.

In the private sector, productivity is the sum of all goods and services (as measured by Gross Domestic Product) divided by the number of workers. But in the public sector, there is no reliable measure of the “goods and services” received because prices are not set on a voluntary basis. Rather, citizens pay taxes that are deemed necessary to fund government at a level determined by elected officials.

This study provides a better understanding of the productivity of Illinois’ public sector by examining state-government compensation, including wage and salary and benefit levels across the 50 states.

The basis of this comparison is to examine payrolls in Illinois versus the national average. Since the national average represents an amalgam of 50 states and is the equilibrium level between government productivity and pay, this can be used as a benchmark from which to determine if any one state is more or less productive by observing the deviancy away from the national average. With this relative metric, high pay is not associated with greater productivity, since it is shown that other governments achieve the same performance with lower pay. Being above the national average indicates “low productivity” among the government’s workforce and vice versa.

This analysis found that Illinois’ operating deficit, which has led to more than $6.9 billion in outstanding bills, would not exist if, since 2000, state government had simply paid its employees at a rate relative to what other state governments pay their workers.

Study overview

The first part of the study examines compensation levels in Illinois state government. In calendar year (CY) 2014, the average Illinois state-government compensation was $85,839 per job, while the average Illinois private-sector compensation was $66,492 per job. In other words, the average Illinois state-government job paid 29 percent higher than the average Illinois private-sector job. This is significantly above the national average of state government jobs, which compensate 16.8 percent more than private-sector jobs.

While wages and salaries and benefits contribute to the high state-government compensation levels, this study will dive deeper on wages and salaries because they also contribute to high benefits levels – pensions, for instance, are based on an employee’s earnings.

There are many reasons why, nationally, state-government compensation exceeds the private sector, including differences in educational levels, and some have tried to use this as a rationale for the imbalance between state government and private pay scales. However, studies that control for such variables still find that Illinois state-government workers are richly compensated.This study is not affected by this issue, because in addition to a direct private vs. public comparison, it offers a correction of Illinois’ state-government wages-and-salary ratio to the national average of state-government pay compared to private-sector pay.

Furthermore, it is worth noting that, according to data from the Council for Community and Economic Research’s ACCRA Cost of Living Index, the cost of living in the Springfield metro area, as well as portions of the collar counties, are below the national average. According to data from the Office of Management in Budget, in 2014, 52 percent of the state workforce was in the Springfield area.

The second part of the study will examine Illinois state wages and salaries by 32 government functions such as administration, corrections, highways, public welfare and higher education, among others. This detailed information will provide policymakers with a map to aid in the effort to right-size the payrolls of the state government workforce.

Possible taxpayer savings

Overall, adjusting Illinois government wage-and-salary ratios to the national average in CY 2014 would have saved taxpayers $1 billion across all funds. However, payroll savings to the general funds are more limited because some positions are paid for through dedicated state funds, such as the gas tax to fund highways, or by the federal government, such as unemployment insurance.

The Illinois payroll problem

According to the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Economic Analysis, in CY 2014, Illinois paid state government employees $13 billion in total compensation (wages and salaries plus benefits), or 2.9 percent of non-farm private earnings. This includes payroll from all funding sources, be it from the general funds, dedicated funds or federal funds and allows for apples-to-apples comparisons across the states.

Policymakers need relative metrics to judge whether Illinois state-government employees are paid too much. The “compensation ratio” offers that perspective.

The compensation ratio

The compensation ratio is derived by dividing state-government compensation per job by private-sector compensation per job. In CY 2014, Illinois state-government compensation was $85,839 per job, which is 29 percent higher than the private-sector compensation of $66,492 per job.

The compensation ratio is shown in Chart 1. Between CY 1979 and 2000, Illinois’ public-sector compensation was generally below the national average. However, since 2000 state-government compensation not only exceeds private-sector compensation, but also the national average compensation ratio. In CY 2014, Illinois’ state compensation ratio ranked as the ninth-highest in the country, and higher than the national average ratio of 16.8 percent.

right_sizing_government_payrolls-01

More specifically, compensation is composed of two components. The first is the wage or salary paid to the employee for services rendered. The second is benefits, which include employer-provided health insurance and retirement.

The wage-and-salary ratio

The wage-and-salary ratio is derived by dividing state-government wages and salaries per job by private-sector wages and salaries per job. As shown in Charts 2 and 3, in CY 2014, Illinois state-government wages and salaries were $59,679 per job, which is 7 percent higher than the private-sector wages and salaries of $55,623 per job. In CY 2013, Illinois’ wage-and-salary ratio ranked as the ninth-highest in the country.

right_sizing_government_payrolls-02

right_sizing_government_payrolls-03

These data show that Illinois is very much out of step with pay scales in other states. Generally speaking, the old adage that government workers take lower pay in exchange for higher future benefits, such as pensions, is true on a national basis – but not in Illinois. Overwhelming data show that state-government workers in Illinois earn high pay and high benefits.

The benefits ratio

The benefit ratio is derived by dividing state-government benefits per job by private-sector benefits per job. As shown in Charts 4 and 5, in CY 2014, Illinois’ state-government benefits were $26,160 per job, which is 141 percent above the private-sector benefits of $10,869 per job. In 2013, Illinois’ benefit ratio ranked as the 14th-highest in the country.

right_sizing_government_payrolls-04

right_sizing_government_payrolls-05

Missed opportunities for savings

Chart 6 shows how much state government money could have been saved if the Illinois wage-and-salary ratio was aligned with the national average in each year between CY 1979 and 2014. Since 2000, taxpayers would have saved up to $7.7-plus billion (in nominal dollars). In CY 2014 alone, adjusting the wage-and-salary ratio to the national average would have saved taxpayers $1 billion across all funds.

right_sizing_government_payrolls-06

Chart 7 shows how much state government spending could have been reduced if state workers were to meet taxpayers halfway on the benefits side by cutting the benefit ratio to 60 percent from 120 percent. In CY 2014, this adjusted benefit ratio would have saved taxpayers up to $1.2 billion or more.

right_sizing_government_payrolls-07

Reducing wages and salaries would also provide a significant down payment toward achieving the important goal of putting the Illinois pension system on a more sustainable path.

Illinois wages and salaries ratio by state government function

This section of the study will delve deeper into the functions of Illinois state government to better pinpoint the areas where state wages and salaries are most out of line with the private sector relative to the national average. Given the large gap for state government wages and salaries between Illinois and the national average, it is not surprising that this situation exists for 14 government functions, as shown in Table 1 for fiscal year 2014. Potential wage-and-salary savings are shown in Table 2 and necessary percent reduction in wages and salaries in Table 3.

right_sizing_government_payrolls-08right_sizing_government_payrolls-09right_sizing_government_payrolls-10

• Other government administration (Illinois ranks third-highest nationally in this function): Includes administrative functions not included in financial, social insurance, judicial and legal administration.

o Lowering the wage-and-salary ratio of 42 percent to the national average of 3 percent would save up to $53 million or more. This would require a reduction in the average wages and salaries per job of 26 percent to $56,312 from $76,307.

• Judicial and legal (Illinois ranks fourth-highest nationally in this function): Includes courts (criminal and civil) and activities associated with courts, legal services and legal counseling of indigent or other needy persons.

o Lowering the wage-and-salary ratio of 92 percent to the national average of 27 percent would save up to $121 million or more. This would require a reduction in the average wages and salaries per job of 34 percent to $69,546 from $105,934.

• Police protection/officers (Illinois ranks sixteenth highest nationally in this function): Includes employees of general police, sheriff, state police and other governmental departments that preserve law and order, protect persons and property from illegal acts, and work to prevent, control, investigate and reduce crime.

o Lowering the wage-and-salary ratio of 72 percent to the national average of 53 percent would save up to $4 million or more. This would require a reduction in the average wages and salaries per job of 2 percent to $85,157 from $86,567.

• Police/other (Illinois ranks seventh highest nationally in this function): Includes police functions other than for police officers.

o Lowering the wage-and-salary ratio of 38 percent to the national average of -5 percent would save up to $28 million or more. This would require a reduction in the average wages and salaries per job of 25 percent to $52,129 from $69,274.

• Correction (Illinois ranks fifth highest nationally in this function): Includes all institutional and non-institutional correctional activities. Institutional activities are residential institutions or facilities for the confinement, correction and rehabilitation of convicted adults or juveniles adjudicated delinquent or in need of supervision, and for the detention of adults and juveniles charged with a crime and awaiting trial. Non-institutional correctional activities consist of pardon, probation and parole activities.

o Lowering the wage-and-salary ratio of 26 percent to the national average of 1 percent would save up to $246 million or more. This would require a reduction in the average wages and salaries per job of 24 percent to $55,938 from $73,514.

• Highways (Illinois ranks sixth highest nationally in this function): Includes the maintenance, operation, repair and construction of highways, streets, roads, alleys, sidewalks, bridges, tunnels, ferry boats and related structures, including those operated on a toll basis.

o Lowering the wage-and-salary ratio of 26 percent to the national average of 7 percent would save up to $117 million or more. This would require a reduction in the average wages and salaries per job of 15 percent to $59,511 from $71,801.

• Public welfare (Illinois ranks fifth highest nationally in this function): Includes employees engaged in all public welfare activities, including the administration of public assistance and providing direct assistance such as Medicaid and TANF (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families) cash assistance.

o Lowering the wage-and-salary ratio of 23 percent to the national average of -9 percent would save up to $224 million or more. This would require a reduction in the average wages and salaries per job of 27 percent to $50,255 from $68,842.

• Water transport and terminals (Illinois ranks seventh highest nationally in this function): Construction, maintenance, operation, and support of canals and other waterways, harbors, docks, wharves, and related marine terminal facilities.

o Lowering the wage-and-salary ratio of 38 percent to the national average of 13 percent would save up to $400,000 or more. This would require a reduction in the average wages and salaries per job of 9 percent to $69,295 from $76,502.

• Health (Illinois ranks second highest nationally in this function): Includes provision of services for the conservation and improvement of public health, other than hospital care.

o Lowering the wage-and-salary ratio of 47 percent to the national average of -1 percent would save up to $71 million or more. This would require a reduction in the average wages and salaries per job of 30 percent to $55,862 from $79,429.

• Hospitals (Illinois ranks twelfth highest nationally in this function): Includes hospital facilities providing in-patient medical care and institutions primarily for care and treatment of handicapped (rather than education), which are directly administered by a government, including those operated by public universities.

o Lowering the wage-and-salary ratio of 15 percent to the national average of 6 percent would save up to $49 million or more. This would require a reduction in the average wages and salaries per job of 6 percent to $58,828 from $62,593.

• Social insurance administration (Illinois ranks fifth highest nationally in this function): Includes administration of unemployment compensation systems.

o Lowering the wage-and-salary ratio of 23 percent to the national average of -3 percent would save up to $33 million or more. This would require a reduction in the average wages and salaries per job of 21 percent to $55,447 from $71,690.

• Parks and recreation (Illinois ranks fifth highest nationally in this function): Includes provision and support of recreational and cultural-scientific facilities maintained for the benefit of residents and visitors.

o Lowering the wage-and-salary ratio of 7 percent to the national average of -30 percent would save up to $9 million or more. This would require a reduction in the average wages and salaries per job of 33 percent to $38,883 from $58,011.

• Other education (Illinois ranks 30th-highest nationally in this function): Includes employees in support of special programs and institutions primarily for: Training and education (rather than care) of the blind, deaf or other handicapped, programs for adult, vocational or special education that operate outside school systems, educational activities not assignable to other education functions.

o Lowering the wage-and-salary ratio of 14 percent to the national average of -3 percent would save up to $8 million or more. This would require a reduction in the average wages and salaries per job of 6 percent to $54,696 from $ 57,926.

• Other and unallocable (Illinois ranks twelfth highest nationally in this function): Includes employees engaged in activities that are not applicable to other employment functions or are multifunctional such as voter registration and elections, economic development and code enforcement.

o Lowering the wage-and-salary ratio of 21 percent to the national average of 9 percent would save up to $60 million or more. This would require a reduction in the average wages and salaries per job of 11 percent to $60,429 from $67,951.

Possible taxpayer savings

Right-sizing Illinois state government payrolls along these lines could save up to $1 billion a year.

However, not all of the potential wage-and-salary savings will flow to the general funds because some positions are paid for by dedicated state funds, such as the gas tax to fund highways, or by the federal government, such as unemployment insurance.

The need to act now

As shown in Chart 2, the gap between state-government wages and salaries and private-sector wages and salaries is growing at an alarming rate. In fact, the pay gap could double to 14 percent from 7 percent in just a few years if terms similar to those in the existing contract persist.

The only sure way to prevent the disparity from growing is for the governor to insist on an immediate across-the-board pay freeze for three years. The expiration of the current state-government labor contract provides opportunities to find real savings for the next fiscal year.

Lower wages and salaries will result in lower benefits because a significant factor in determining a state employee’s pension is his or her wage or salary level at retirement. Reducing wages and salaries would therefore be a significant step toward putting Illinois’ government-worker pension system on a more sustainable path.

Finally, policymakers should remember the best course of action is to allow the private sector to grow, which will boost income and employment. Policymakers must pursue pro-growth economic policies – such as reducing regulatory burdens, lowering taxes and securing property rights – that will promote economic development by allowing private-sector businesses to better compensate and hire additional employees. Such policies are a win-win for both the private and public sectors.

See All Reports

Sours: https://www.illinoispolicy.org/reports/right-sizing-illinois-state-governments-payrolls/
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Illinois Community College System
Annual Administrator and Faculty Salary and Benefits Portal

Welcome to the Illinois Community College System Annual Administrator and Faculty Salary and Benefits Portal website. The website provides a single point of reference to review salary and benefits information for administrative and instructional employees (full and part-time) in Illinois’ 48 public community colleges.

A tool for identifying the community college closest to a specific location is available at the Zip Code Locator. Community colleges serve nearly one million Illinois residents each year in credit and noncredit courses and many more through their public service programs. Illinois community colleges prepare people for college, for transfer to other colleges or universities, and for good paying jobs that demand high skills. Community colleges also provide adult, literacy, and continuing education and services. Note that three key sources of funding for Illinois public community colleges are student tuition and fees, state taxes, and local taxes.

Fiscal Year 2010 (July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010) is the first year for this new reporting process. Prior year summary tables containing salary information are available on the Illinois Community College Board website at the following embedded links (based on a Fall\October 1 census date snapshots): Salary Report for Illinois Community Colleges

The Illinois Community College System Annual Administrator and Faculty Salary and Benefits Portal addresses requirements of Public Act 096-0266 which states that, "Each board of trustees shall report on or before July 1 of each year, the base salary (base pay) and benefits of the president or chief executive officer of the community college and all administrators, faculty members, and instructors employed by the community college district." "Benefits" includes vacation days, sick days, bonuses (defined as extra duty pay), annuities, and retirement enhancements. The legislation requires that the most recent data be available the day after a fiscal year ends. To comply with this requirement, colleges submitted data on June 15 and estimated final payments through June 30.
The information in the Annual Administrator and Faculty Salary and Benefits Portal website will be updated annually.   New features will be added as they become available.

To begin, please click one of the options in the left-hand column.

Thank you for your interest in the Illinois Community College System.

The Annual Administrator and Faculty Salary and Benefits Portal website is intended to provide information that stands alone.  If there is a pressing question about data pertaining to a specific college or employee please contact the college directly. A list of the main telephone number for each college appears at the following link Public Community Colleges in Illinois  Ask the operator to transfer the call to the college’s Freedom of Information Officer (individual responsible for public information).

For downloadable data please select the appropriate year - 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020

Similar salary and in some cases benefits information is available about public employees in Illinois at the following web portals:

If you encounter technical difficulties with this website please contact Gracelyn Roman or Charles Yocom
For questions about the statewide initiative contact [email protected]

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Sours: http://iccbdbsrv.iccb.org/salarysearch/home.cfm
Average Salary In the United States By Age - Austin Kelly

Average Salary for State of Illinois (IL) Employees

State of Illinois (IL) Reviews

Overall Satisfaction

Ratings

Learning and Development

2.9

Stressful, but rewarding.

Fund Accounting Manager in Springfield, Illinois:

Pros: The mission of the plan as a whole

Cons: The office politics

Clerical with the State.

Office Assistant in Chicago, Illinois:

Pros: - Great job protection via Union - Upward Mobility Program for Continued Education - Positions available Statewide - Flex Shifts available

Cons: - You earn vacation time per month. You do not earn a full day of vacation until you've worked 7 years - Promotion System heavily favors seniority over merit. To obtain a different position within the company (promotion or otherwise), you must obtain a grade (A,B,C, and Unqualified). A form similar to a resume is completed and an unknown person grades it. They begin with all persons who have an A with most seniority. - No matter experience, you start at the lowest level when you begin. Few exceptions are made for persons with 10+ years of experience.

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About State of Illinois

Address: Springfield, Illinois

Website: https://www2.illinois.gov/

Industries: Association, Office Administration, Real Estate, Government

Number of Employees: 10,001-1,000,000

"About This Company" data & logos provided by

Years of Experience

This data is based on 75 survey responses.

Gender Breakdown

Female

53.4%

Avg. Salary: $39k - $98k

Male

44.8%

Avg. Salary: $40k - $124k

This data is based on 58 survey responses. Learn more about the gender pay gap.

Popular Degrees

Pay ranges for employees at State of Illinois (IL) by degree.

Popular Locations for State of Illinois (IL)

  1. Springfield, Illinois
  2. Chicago, Illinois
  3. Champaign, Illinois
  4. Naperville, Illinois
  5. Normal, Illinois
  6. Peoria, Illinois
  7. Bloomington, Illinois
  8. Chicago Heights, Illinois
  9. Elgin, Illinois
  10. Joliet, Illinois

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State of Illinois (IL) Job Listings

Related Companies

Companies in the same industry as State of Illinois (IL), ranked by salary.

Sours: https://www.payscale.com/research/US/Employer=State_of_Illinois_(IL)/Salary

Illinois salaries of state

Total Wages and Salaries in Illinois (ILWTOT)

Source:U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis  

Source:Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  

Release:Personal Income by State  

Units:  Thousands of Dollars, Seasonally Adjusted Annual Rate

Frequency:  Quarterly

Suggested Citation:

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, Total Wages and Salaries in Illinois [ILWTOT], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/ILWTOT, October 19, 2021.

Sours: https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/ILWTOT
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Illinois state government salaries for public employees are made public online for many public workers on the Illinois Transparency and Accountability portal.[1] Governor Pat Quinn signed the bill that requires the Department of Central Management Services to create a website with information regarding state expenditures, tax credits, state employee salaries and state contracts.[2]

According to 2008 U.S. Census data, the state of Illinois and local governments in the state employed a total of 790,539 people.[3] Of those employees, 566,872 were full-time employees receiving net wages of $2,491,829,151 per month and 233,667 were part-time employees paid $212,405,146 per month.[3] Sixty percent of those employees, or 450,443 employees, were in education or higher education.[3]

Legislator salaries

See also: Comparison of state legislative salaries
State legislators
SalaryPer diem
$69,464/year$151/day

State executive salaries

See also: Compensation of state executive officers


As of 2009, the salary of Illinois' governor ranked 9th among U.S. governors' salaries. The average salary earned by U.S. governors was $131,115.

Judicial salaries

See also: State court budgets and judicial salaries
Chief JusticeAssociate Justices

$214,000

$214,000

As of 2010, the salary of Illinois' chief justice ranked 2nd among U.S. chief justices' salaries. The average salary earned by U.S. chief justices was $157,220. The median salary earned by U.S. chief justices was $154,250.

As of 2010, the salary of Illinois' associate justices ranked 2nd among U.S. associate justices' salaries. The average salary earned by U.S. associate justices was $151,918. The median salary earned by U.S. associate justices was $148,245.[4]

State profile

USA Illinois location map.svg
Demographic data for Illinois
 IllinoisU.S.
Total population:12,839,047316,515,021
Land area (sq mi):55,5193,531,905
Race and ethnicity**
White:72.3%73.6%
Black/African American:14.3%12.6%
Asian:5%5.1%
Native American:0.2%0.8%
Pacific Islander:0%0.2%
Two or more:2.2%3%
Hispanic/Latino:16.5%17.1%
Education
High school graduation rate:87.9%86.7%
College graduation rate:32.3%29.8%
Income
Median household income:$57,574$53,889
Persons below poverty level:16.8%11.3%
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, "American Community Survey" (5-year estimates 2010-2015)
Click here for more information on the 2020 census and here for more on its impact on the redistricting process in Illinois.
**Note: Percentages for race and ethnicity may add up to more than 100 percent because respondents may report more than one race and the Hispanic/Latino ethnicity may be selected in conjunction with any race. Read more about race and ethnicity in the census here.
See also: Presidential voting trends in Illinois

Illinois voted for the Democratic candidate in all five presidential elections between 2000 and 2016.

Pivot Counties (2016)

Ballotpedia identified 206 counties that voted for Donald Trump (R) in 2016 after voting for Barack Obama (D) in 2008 and 2012. Collectively, Trump won these Pivot Counties by more than 580,000 votes. Of these 206 counties, 11 are located in Illinois, accounting for 5.34 percent of the total pivot counties.[5]

Pivot Counties (2020)

In 2020, Ballotpedia re-examined the 206 Pivot Counties to view their voting patterns following that year's presidential election. Ballotpedia defined those won by Trump won as Retained Pivot Counties and those won by Joe Biden (D) as Boomerang Pivot Counties. Nationwide, there were 181 Retained Pivot Counties and 25 Boomerang Pivot Counties. Illinois had 11 Retained Pivot Counties, 6.08 percent of all Retained Pivot Counties.

More Illinois coverage on Ballotpedia

See also

External links

Sours: https://ballotpedia.org/Illinois_state_government_salary

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