Masters past winners and results

Masters past winners and results DEFAULT

Masters Winners Through the Years

The list of Masters tournament winners is sprinkled with some of the most famous names in golf. Over the past nine decades, top golfers like Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer, Tiger Woods and Gary Player have claimed the famed Masters title. Woods () and Jordan Spieth () share the record for the lowest Masters winning score of

s

The very first Masters was held in At the time, not even Bobby Jones and Clifford Roberts knew that it would become such an important and vital element of professional golf. It is interesting to note that the winning scores of the very first Masters are not particularly higher than most of the tournament's recent winners.

YearGolferScore
Horton Smith
Gene Sarazen
Horton Smith
Byron Nelson
Henry Picard
Ralph Guldahl

s

The s is an important decade in the history of the Masters for two reasons. This was the only decade in which the tournament was canceled. From , the Masters was suspended due to World War II. The other reason the s is an important decade is because marked the first time that the Masters winner received the coveted green jacket.

YearGolferScore
Jimmy Demaret
Craig Wood
Byron Nelson
Herman Keiser
Jimmy Demaret
Claude Harmon
Sam Snead

s

The s was notable for the Masters due to a four-year run in which the winner was either one of two legends, Ben Hogan and Sam Snead. The decade drew to a close with the crowning of a legend-to-be named Arnold Palmer.

YearGolferScore
Jimmy Demaret
Ben Hogan
Sam Snead
Ben Hogan
Sam Snead
Cary Middlecoff
Jack Burke
Doug Ford
Arnold Palmer
Art Wall Jr.

s

The s was a golfer's dream for the Masters. The two biggest names in golf for the next two decades, Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus, each battled for supremacy by slipping on the green jacket more than half the decade.

YearGolferScore
Arnold Palmer
Gary Player
Arnold Palmer
Jack Nicklaus
Arnold Palmer
Jack Nicklaus
Jack Nicklaus
Gay Brewer Jr.
Bob Goalby
George Archer

s

The Masters in the s was mainly a battle between Gary Player and Jack Nicklaus against a host of one-time winners.

YearGolferScore
Billy Casper
Charles Coody
Jack Nicklaus
Tommy Aaron
Gary Player
Jack Nicklaus
Ray Floyd
Tom Watson
Gary Player
Fuzzy Zoeller

s

The s was big news for the Masters as Jack Nicklaus won his last of a record six tournaments.

YearGolferScore
Severiano Ballesteros
Tom Watson
Craig Stadler
Severiano Ballesteros
Ben Crenshaw
Bernhard Langer
Jack Nicklaus
Larry Mize
Sandy Lyle
Nick Faldo

s

The s will most likely be remembered mainly as the decade in which Tiger Woods won his first Masters.

YearGolferScore
Nick Faldo
Ian Woosnam
Fred Couples
Bernard Langer
Jose M.Olazabal
Ben Crenshaw
Nick Faldo
Tiger Woods
Mark O'Meara
Jose M. Olazabal

s

Tiger Woods cemented his place in history as one of the greatest golfers to ever play the game and a large part of his legacy will be his domination of the Masters in the early part of the decade. The Masters of the s will also be remembered as the tournament in which Phil Mickelson established himself as a majors player.

YearGolferScore
Vijay Singh
Tiger Woods
Tiger Woods
Mike Weir
Phil Mickelson
Tiger Woods
Phil Mickelson
Zach Johnson
Trevor Immelman
Angel Cabrera

s

Masters winners in the s brought many new faces, including Jordan Spieth who became the second youngest golfer to ever win the title. Spieth was just 21 years old when he went wire-to-wire to win the Masters with a record-tying

YearGolferScore
Phil Mickelson
Charl Schwartzel
Bubba Watson
Adam Scott
Bubba Watson
Jordan Spieth
Danny Willett
Sergio Garcia
Patrick Reed
Tiger Woods

s

The new decade of Masters tournaments got off to an unprecidented start, with the tournament being moved to November due to the COVID pandemic.

YearGolferScore
Dustin Johnson
Hideki Matsuyama

About the Author

Timothy Sexton is an award-winning author who started writing in He has written on topics ranging from politics and golf to nutrition and travel, and his work appears online for Zappos.com, Disaboom, USAToday.com and MOJO, among others. He has also done work for "Sherlock Holmes and Philosophy." He holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of West Florida.

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Masters winners by year: List of past champions, payouts, green jacket history

There is something special about winning the Masters.

It's an accomplishment many golfers aspire to achieve. Factor in the pageantry of the green jacket and the setting at Augusta National Golf Club, and it's hard to top. 

The green jacket recipients at Augusta form an exclusive club, with many of golf's all-time greats adorning the list of winners since the tournament's inception in Below is a list of Masters winners from each year, as well as how much money the winner gets and the history behind the illustrious green jacket.

MORE: Masters field by the numbers

Masters winners by year

The list of Masters winners is filled with golf's best of all time. Jack Nicklaus holds the record for most Masters victories with six. Tiger Woods will have a chance for his fifth victory at Augusta this year. He is currently tied with Arnold Palmer with four wins. Woods, Nicklaus and Nick Faldo are the only golfers to win consecutive Masters, so Patrick Reed will join rare company if he can accomplish the feat this year.

The tournament record of under par is held by Woods, who set it in , and Jordan Spieth, who tied it with his victory. Woods' win also set the record for largest margin of victory at 12 strokes. 

YearWinnerScore
TBD
Patrick Reed
Sergio Garcia-9
Danny Willett-5
Jordan Spieth
Bubba Watson-8
Adam Scott-9
Bubba Watson
Charl Schwartzel
Phil Mickelson
Angel Cabrera
Trevor Immelman-8
Zach Johnson+1
Phil Mickelson-7
Tiger Woods
Phil Mickelson-9
Mike Weir-7
Tiger Woods
Tiger Woods
Vijay Singh
José María Olazábal-8
Mark O'Meara-9
Tiger Woods
Nick Faldo
Ben Crenshaw
José María Olazábal-9
Bernhard Langer
Fred Couples
Ian Woosnam
Nick Faldo
Nick Faldo-5
Sandy Lyle-7
Larry Mize-3
Jack Nicklaus-9
Bernhard Langer-6
Ben Crenshaw
Seve Ballesteros-8
Craig Stadler-4
Tom Watson-8
Seve Ballesteros
Fuzzy Zoeller-8
Gary Player
Tom Watson
Raymond Floyd
Jack Nicklaus
Gary Player
Tommy Aaron-5
Jack Nicklaus-2
Charles Coody-9
Billy Casper-9
George Archer-7
Bob Goalby
Gay Brewer-8
Jack NicklausE
Jack Nicklaus
Arnold Palmer
Jack Nicklaus-2
Arnold Palmer-8
Gary Player-8
Arnold Palmer-6
Art Wall Jr.-4
Arnold Palmer-4
Doug Ford-5
Jack Burke Jr.+1
Cary Middlecoff-9
Sam Snead+1
Ben Hogan
Sam Snead-2
Ben Hogan-8
Jimmy Demaret-5
Sam Snead-6
Claude Harmon-9
Jimmy Demaret-7
Herman Keiser-6
Byron Nelson-8
Craig Wood-8
Jimmy Demaret-8
Ralph Guldahl-9
Henry Picard-3
Byron Nelson-5
Horton Smith-3
Gene Sarazen-6
Horton Smith-4

*Note: The Masters was not played from due to World War II.

How much does the Masters winner make?

In addition to the green jacket, the winner of the Masters will get a cool $2,,. Patrick Reed made $1,, as last year's champion, and it's not a surprise that with the purse increasing, so does the prize for first place. The winner's share first increased to over $1 million when Tiger Woods won the Masters. For the first nine years of the tournament, the champion took home only $1,

The Masters champ will get more money than the winner of any major last year. The $2 million prize for winning the U.S. Open was the highest in  

MORE: List of payouts from the Masters

History of the Green Jacket

The green jacket — given to the Masters winner — is an iconic and unique symbol of the tournament. It is awarded to the victor directly after the tournament, with the previous champion on hand for a passing of the torch. The green jacket made its debut in , 15 years after the first tournament, when it was won by Sam Snead. 

Its origin stems back to , when members of Augusta National Golf Club would wear green jackets during the tournament as a way to identify themselves and be able to answer questions from spectators.

When Nicklaus won his second consecutive Masters, he simply put the jacket on himself, and Faldo and Woods received help from the chairman at the time when they repeated. 

Nobody is allowed to wear the green jacket except Augusta National members and tournament winners. The champion can take it off club grounds but must return it the next year.

(Info via Augusta National)

Sours: https://www.sportingnews.com/us/golf/news/masters-winners-by-year-past-champions-payouts-green-jacket-history/1qy1zn4xb6jw31iknhxrpktb32
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The old mantra is that the Masters Tournament winning score is whatever the course demands that week, with the Augusta National Golf Club not looking for any particular winning score in their tradition unlike any other.

However, the Masters Tournament winning score has been at a common figure. The most common Masters Tournament winning score has been 8 under par, which has happened 13 times since the tournament began in The next most common score is 9-under , which has happened 11 times.

A winning score equal to or lower than 10 under par has been recorded 29 times. The record hole Masters Tournament total is under , first shot by Tiger Woods in and matched by Jordan Spieth in

Of course, being the only men's major contested on the same course each year, the Masters home course, Augusta National Golf Club has always been a par course.

Masters Tournament winning scores against par

Click header to sort

YEARWINNERTOTALTO PAR
Tiger Woods
Jordan Spieth
Jack Nicklaus
Raymond Floyd
Tiger Woods
Phil Mickelson
Patrick Reed
Ben Hogan
Ben Crenshaw
Charl Schwartzel
Seve Ballesteros
Fred Couples
Tiger Woods
Arnold Palmer
Jack Nicklaus
Tom Watson
Nick Faldo
Tiger Woods
Tiger Woods
Ángel Cabrera
Bob Goalby
Gary Player
Ben Crenshaw
Ian Woosnam
Bernhard Langer
Gary Player
Nick Faldo
Vijay Singh
Bubba Watson
Ralph Guldahl-9
Claude Harmon-9
Cary Middlecoff-9
Billy Casper-9
Charles Coody-9
Jack Nicklaus-9
José María Olazábal-9
Mark O'Meara-9
Phil Mickelson-9
Adam Scott-9
Sergio García-9
Jimmy Demaret-8
Craig Wood-8
Byron Nelson-8
Ben Hogan-8
Gary Player-8
Arnold Palmer-8
Gay Brewer-8
Fuzzy Zoeller-8
Tom Watson-8
Seve Ballesteros-8
José María Olazábal-8
Trevor Immelman-8
Bubba Watson-8
Jimmy Demaret-7
George Archer-7
Sandy Lyle-7
Mike Weir-7
Phil Mickelson-7
Gene Sarazen-6
Herman Keiser-6
Sam Snead-6
Arnold Palmer-6
Bernhard Langer-6
Byron Nelson-5
Jimmy Demaret-5
Doug Ford-5
Tommy Aaron-5
Nick Faldo-5
Danny Willett-5
Horton Smith-4
Arnold Palmer-4
Art Wall, Jr.-4
Craig Stadler-4
Horton Smith-3
Henry Picard-3
Larry Mize-3
Sam Snead-2
Jack Nicklaus-2
Jack Nicklaus-2
Jack NicklausE
Sam Snead1
Jack Burke, Jr.1
Zach Johnson1

Tags Masters TournamentAugusta National course parMasters Tournament winning scores

Sours: https://thegolfnewsnet.com/golfnewsnetteam//06/14/masters-tournament-winning-scores-a-history-of-thehole-winning-totals/
A Champion's Gift of Golf

Masters Tournament

Golf tournament held in Augusta, Georgia, United States

"The Masters" redirects here. For other sports tournaments that may be referred to as "The Masters", see Master. For the C. P. Snow novel, see The Masters (novel).

The Masters Tournament (usually referred to as simply The Masters, or the U.S. Masters outside North America[2][3]) is one of the four major championships in professional golf. Scheduled for the first full week of April, the Masters is the first major of the year, and unlike the others, it is always held at the same location, Augusta National Golf Club, a private course in the southeastern United States, in the city of Augusta, Georgia.

The Masters was started by amateur champion Bobby Jones and investment bankerClifford Roberts.[4] After his grand slam in , Jones acquired the former plant nursery and co-designed Augusta National with course architect Alister MacKenzie.[1] First played 87&#;years ago in , the tournament is an official money event on the PGA Tour, the European Tour, and the Japan Golf Tour. The field of players is smaller than those of the other major championships because it is an invitational event, held by the Augusta National Golf Club.

The tournament has a number of traditions. Since , a green jacket has been awarded to the champion, who must return it to the clubhouse one year after his victory, although it remains his personal property and is stored with other champions' jackets in a specially designated cloakroom. In most instances, only a first-time and currently reigning champion may remove his jacket from the club grounds. A golfer who wins the event multiple times uses the same green jacket awarded upon his initial win (unless they need to be re-fitted with a new jacket).[5] The Champions Dinner, inaugurated by Ben Hogan in , is held on the Tuesday before each tournament, and is open only to past champions and certain board members of the Augusta National Golf Club. Beginning in , legendary golfers, usually past champions, have hit an honorary tee shot on the morning of the first round to commence play. These have included Fred McLeod, Jock Hutchinson, Gene Sarazen, Sam Snead, Byron Nelson, Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus, Gary Player, and Lee Elder. Since , a semi-social contest at the par-3 course has been played on Wednesday, the day before the first round.

Nicklaus has the most Masters wins, with six between and Tiger Woods has won five between and Palmer had won four between and Five have won three titles at Augusta: Jimmy Demaret, Sam Snead, Gary Player, Nick Faldo, and Phil Mickelson. Player, from South Africa, was the first non-American player to win the tournament, in ; the second was Seve Ballesteros of Spain, the champion in and

The Augusta National course first opened 88&#;years ago in and has been modified many times by different architects. Among the changes: greens have been reshaped and, on occasion, entirely re-designed, bunkers have been added, water hazards have been extended, new tee boxes have been built, hundreds of trees have been planted, and several mounds have been installed.[6]

History[edit]

Masters logo
at the club entrance

Augusta National Golf Club[edit]

Main article: Augusta National Golf Club

The idea for Augusta National originated with Bobby Jones, who wanted to build a golf course after his retirement from the game. He sought advice from Clifford Roberts, who later became the chairman of the club. They came across a piece of land in Augusta, Georgia, of which Jones said: "Perfect! And to think this ground has been lying here all these years waiting for someone to come along and lay a golf course upon it."[7] The land had been an indigo plantation in the early nineteenth century and a plant nursery since [8] Jones hired Alister MacKenzie to help design the course, and work began in The course formally opened in , but MacKenzie died before the first Masters Tournament was played.[9]

Early tournament years[edit]

The first "Augusta National Invitation Tournament", as the Masters was originally known, began on March 22, , and was won by Horton Smith, who took the first prize of $1, The present name was adopted in The first tournament was played with current holes 10 through 18 played as the first nine, and 1 through 9 as the second nine[10] then reversed permanently to its present layout for the tournament.[4]

Initially the Augusta National Invitation field was composed of Bobby Jones' close associates. Jones had petitioned the USGA to hold the U.S. Open at Augusta but the USGA denied the petition, noting that the hot Georgia summers would create difficult playing conditions.[11]

Gene Sarazen hit the "shot heard 'round the world" in , holing a shot from the fairway on the par 5 15th for a double eagle (albatross).[12] This tied Sarazen with Craig Wood, and in the ensuing hole playoff, Sarazen was the victor by five strokes.[13] The tournament was not played from to , due to World War II. To assist the war effort, cattle and turkeys were raised on the Augusta National grounds.[4]

Byron Nelson won the first of two Masters titles in Jimmy Demaret won three times as did Sam Snead in the s and s. Ben Hogan won the and Masters and was runner-up on four occasions.

s–s[edit]

The Big Three of Arnold Palmer, Gary Player, and Jack Nicklaus dominated the Masters from through , winning the event 11 times among them during that span. After winning by one stroke in ,[13] Palmer won by one stroke again in in memorable circumstances. Trailing Ken Venturi by one shot in the event, Palmer made birdies on the last two holes to prevail. Palmer would go on to win another two Masters in and [13]

Jack Nicklaus emerged in the early s and served as a rival to the popular Palmer. Nicklaus won his first green jacket in , defeating Tony Lema by one stroke.[14] Two years later, he shot a then-course record of (17 under par) for his second Masters win, leading Bobby Jones to say that Nicklaus played "a game with which I am not familiar."[15] The next year, Nicklaus won his third green jacket in a grueling hole playoff against Tommy Jacobs and Gay Brewer.[16] This made Nicklaus the first player to win consecutive Masters. He won again in by three strokes.[13] In , Nicklaus won by one stroke in a close contest with Tom Weiskopf and Johnny Miller in one of the most exciting Masters to date.[17]

Gary Player became the first non-American to win the Masters in , beating Palmer, the defending champion, by one stroke when Palmer double-bogeyed the final hole.[13] In , he won again by two strokes.[13] After not winning a tournament on the U.S. PGA tour for nearly four years, and at the age of 42, Player won his third and final Masters in by one stroke over three players.[13] Player currently shares (with Fred Couples) the record of making 23 consecutive cuts, and has played in a record 52 Masters.[18][19]

A controversial ending to the Masters occurred in Argentine champion Roberto De Vicenzo signed his scorecard (attested by playing partner Tommy Aaron) incorrectly recording him as making a par 4 instead of a birdie 3 on the 17th hole of the final round. According to the rules of golf, if a player signs a scorecard (thereby attesting to its veracity) that records a score on a hole higher than what he actually made on the hole, the player receives the higher score for that hole. This extra stroke cost De Vicenzo a chance to be in an hole Monday playoff with Bob Goalby, who won the green jacket. De Vicenzo's mistake led to the famous quote, "What a stupid I am."[13][20]

In , Lee Elder became the first African American to play in the Masters,[21] doing so 15 years before Augusta National admitted its first black member, Ron Townsend, as a result of the Shoal Creek Controversy.[22]

s–s[edit]

Non-Americans collected 11 victories in 20 years in the s and s, by far the strongest run they have had in any of the three majors played in the United States since the early days of the U.S. Open. The first European to win the Masters was Seve Ballesteros in Nicklaus became the oldest player to win the Masters in when he won for the sixth time at age [13][23]

During this period, no golfer suffered more disappointment at the Masters than Greg Norman. In his first appearance at Augusta in , he led during the second nine but ended up finishing fourth. In , after birdieing holes 14 through 17 to tie Nicklaus for the lead, he badly pushed his 4-iron approach on 18 into the patrons surrounding the green and missed his par putt for a closing bogey. In , Norman lost a sudden-death playoff when Larry Mize holed out a remarkable yard pitch shot to birdie the second playoff hole. Mize thus became the first Augusta native to win the Masters.[24] In , Norman tied the course record with an opening-round 63 and had a six-stroke lead over Nick Faldo entering the final round. However, he stumbled to a closing 78 while Faldo, his playing partner that day, carded a 67 to win by five shots for his third Masters championship.[25] Norman also led the Masters on the second nine of the final round, only to falter again and finish third behind winner José María Olazábal, who won his second green jacket. Norman finished in the top five at the Masters eight times but never won.

Two-time champion Ben Crenshaw captured an emotional Masters win in , just days after the death of his lifelong teacher and mentor Harvey Penick. After making his final putt to win, he broke down sobbing at the hole and was consoled and embraced by his caddie. In the post-tournament interview, Crenshaw said: "I had a 15th club in my bag," a reference to Penick. (The "15th club" reference is based on the golf rule that limits a player to carrying 14 clubs during a round.) Crenshaw first won at Augusta in

In , year-old Tiger Woods became the youngest champion in Masters history, winning by 12 shots with an under par which broke the hole record that had stood for 32 years.[4] In , Woods completed his "Tiger Slam" by winning his fourth straight major championship at the Masters by two shots over David Duval.[13] He won again the following year, making him only the third player in history (after Nicklaus and Faldo) to win the tournament in consecutive years,[13] as well as in when he defeated Chris DiMarco in a playoff for his first major championship win in almost three years.[13]

In , the Augusta National Golf Club was targeted by Martha Burk, who organized a failed protest at that year's Masters to pressure the club into accepting female members. Burk planned to protest at the front gates of Augusta National during the third day of the tournament, but her application for a permit to do so was denied.[26] A court appeal was dismissed.[27] In , Burk stated that she had no further plans to protest against the club.[28] The club admitted its first two women members, Condoleezza Rice and Darla Moore, in

Augusta National chairman Billy Payne himself made headlines in April when he commented at the annual pre-Masters press conference on Tiger Woods' off-the-course behavior. "It's not simply the degree of his conduct that is so egregious here," Payne said, in his opening speech. "It is the fact he disappointed all of us and more importantly our kids and grandkids."[29][30][31]

In , Mike Weir became the first Canadian to win a men's major championship and the first left-hander to win the Masters when he defeated Len Mattiace in a playoff.[13] The following year another left-hander, Phil Mickelson, won his first major championship by making a birdie on the final hole to beat Ernie Els by a stroke.[13] Mickelson also won the tournament in and In , unheralded South African Charl Schwartzel birdied the final four holes to win by two strokes. In , Bubba Watson won the tournament on the second playoff hole over Louis Oosthuizen. In Adam Scott won the Masters in a playoff over champion Ángel Cabrera, making him the first Australian to win the tournament.[32] Watson won the Masters by three strokes over Jordan Spieth and Jonas Blixt, his second Masters title in three years and the sixth for a left-hander in 12 years. In , Spieth would become the second-youngest winner (behind Woods) in just his second Masters, equaling Woods' hole scoring record.[33] In , Sergio García beat Justin Rose in a playoff for his long-awaited first major title. In , Tiger Woods captured his fifth Masters, his first win at Augusta National in 14 years and his first major title since

The Masters Tournament, originally scheduled to be played April 9–12, was postponed until November due to the ongoing coronavirus outbreak.[34] Dustin Johnson won the tournament by five strokes.

Traditions[edit]

Awards[edit]

The total prize money for the Masters Tournament was $11,,, with $2,, going to the winner. In the inaugural year of , the winner Horton Smith received $1, out of a $5, purse.[35] After Nicklaus's first win in , he received $20,, while after his final victory in he won $,[36][37] In recent years the purse has grown quickly. Between and , the winner's share grew by $,, and the purse grew by $3,,[38][35][39]

Green jacket[edit]

In addition to a cash prize, the winner of the tournament is presented with a distinctive green jacket, formally awarded since and informally awarded to the champions from the years prior. The green sport coat is the official attire worn by members of Augusta National while on the club grounds; each Masters winner becomes an honorary member of the club. The recipient of the green jacket has it presented to him inside the Butler Cabin soon after the end of the tournament in a televised ceremony, and the presentation is then repeated outside near the 18th green in front of the patrons. Winners keep their jacket for the year after their victory, then return it to the club to wear whenever they are present on the club grounds. Sam Snead was the first Masters champion to be awarded the green jacket after he took his first Masters title in

The green jacket is only allowed to be removed from the Augusta National grounds by the reigning champion, after which it must remain at the club. Exceptions to this rule include Gary Player, who in his joy of winning mistakenly took his jacket home to South Africa after his victory (although he has always followed the spirit of the rule and has never worn the jacket);[40]Seve Ballesteros who, in an interview with Peter Alliss from his home in Pedreña, showed one of his two green jackets in his trophy room; and Henry Picard, whose jacket was removed from the club before the tradition was well established, remained in his closet for a number of years, and is now on display at Canterbury Golf Club in Beachwood, Ohio, where he was the club professional for many years.[41][42]

By tradition, the winner of the previous year's Masters Tournament puts the jacket on the current winner at the end of the tournament. In , Jack Nicklaus became the first player to win in consecutive years and he donned the jacket himself.[16] When Nick Faldo (in ) and Tiger Woods (in ) repeated as champions, the chairman of Augusta National put the jacket on them.

There are several awards presented to players who perform exceptional feats during the tournament. The player who has the daily lowest score receives a crystal vase, while players who score a hole-in-one or a double eagle win a large crystal bowl. For each eagle a player makes, they receive a pair of crystal goblets.

In addition to the green jacket, winners of the tournament receive a gold medal. In , a green jacket that was found at a thrift store in was sold at auction for $,[43]

Trophies[edit]

Winners also have their names engraved on the actual silver Masters trophy. The runner-up receives a silver medal, introduced in Beginning in , a silver salver was added as an award for the runner-up.[4]

In , the Masters began presenting an award, known as the Silver Cup, to the lowest scoring amateur to make the cut. In , they began presenting an amateur silver medal to the low amateur runner-up.[4]

The original trophy weighs over pounds and sits on a four-foot-wide base. It resides permanently at Augusta National and depicts the clubhouse of the classic course. The replica, which is significantly smaller, stands just inches tall and weighs 20 pounds. The champion and the runner-up both have their names engraved on the permanent trophy, solidifying themselves in golf history.[44]

The Double Eagle trophy was introduced in when Bruce Devlin holed out for double eagle on number 8. He was only the second to do so, and the first in 32 years, following Gene Sarazen on hole 15 in The trophy is a large crystal bowl with "Masters Tournament" engraved around the top.[45]

Pre-tournament events[edit]

In , Augusta National partnered with the USGA and the PGA of America to establish Drive, Chip and Putt, a youth golf skills competition which was first held in The event was established as part of an effort to help promote the sport of golf among youth; the winners of local qualifiers in different age groups advance to the national finals, which have been held at Augusta National on the Sunday immediately preceding the Masters. The driving and chipping portions of the event are held on the course's practice range, and the putting portion has been played on the 18th hole.[46][47][48]

On April 4, , prior to the tournament, new Augusta National chairman Fred Ridley announced that the club would host the Augusta National Women's Amateur beginning in The first two rounds will be held at the Champion's Retreat club in Evans, Georgia, with the final two rounds hosted by Augusta National (the final round will take place on the Saturday directly preceding the tournament). Ridley stated that holding such an event at Augusta National would have the "greatest impact" on women's golf. Although concerns were raised that the event would conflict with the LPGA Tour's ANA Inspiration (which has invited top amateur players to compete), Ridley stated that he had discussed the event with commissioner Mike Whan, and stated that he agreed on the notion that any move to bolster the prominence of women's golf would be a "win" for the LPGA over time. The winner of the Augusta National Women's Amateur is exempt from two women's golf majors.[49][50]

Par-3 contest[edit]

Main article: Masters Tournament Par-3 contest

The 9th hole on the par 3 course.

The Par-3 contest was first introduced in , and was won that year by Snead. Since then it has traditionally been played on the Wednesday before the tournament starts. The par 3 course was built in It is a nine-hole course, with a par of 27, and measures 1, yards (&#;m) in length.[51]

There have been 94 holes-in-one in the history of the contest, with a record nine occurring in [52]Camilo Villegas became the first player to card two holes-in-one in the same round during the Par 3 Contest. No par 3 contest winner has also won the Masters in the same year.[53][54] There have been several repeat winners, including Pádraig Harrington, Sandy Lyle, Sam Snead, and Tom Watson. The former two won in successive years.

In this event, golfers may use their children as caddies, which helps to create a family-friendly atmosphere. In , the event was televised for the first time by ESPN.

The winner of the par 3 competition, which is played the day before the tournament begins, wins a crystal bowl.[55]

Player invitations[edit]

As with the other majors, winning the Masters gives a golfer several privileges which make his career more secure. Masters champions are automatically invited to play in the other three majors (the U.S. Open, The Open Championship, and the PGA Championship) for the next five years (except for amateur winners, unless they turn pro within the five-year period), and earn a lifetime invitation to the Masters. They also receive membership on the PGA Tour for the following five seasons and invitations to The Players Championship for five years.[56]

Because the tournament was established by an amateur champion, Bobby Jones, the Masters has a tradition of honoring amateur golf. It invites winners of the most prestigious amateur tournaments in the world. Also, the current U.S. Amateur champion always plays in the same group as the defending Masters champion for the first two days of the tournament.

Amateurs in the field are welcome to stay in the "Crow's Nest" atop the Augusta National clubhouse during the tournament. The Crow's Nest is 1, square feet (&#;m2) with lodging space for five during the competition.

Opening tee shot[edit]

Since , the custom in most years has been to start the tournament with an honorary opening tee shot at the first hole, typically by one or more legendary players. The original honorary starters were Jock Hutchison and Fred McLeod; this twosome led off every tournament from until when poor health prevented Hutchison from swinging a club. McLeod continued on until his death in Byron Nelson and Gene Sarazen started in and were then joined by Sam Snead in This trio continued until when Sarazen died, while Nelson stopped in Snead hit his final opening tee shot in , a little over a month before he died.

In , Arnold Palmer took over as the honorary starter. Palmer also had the honor in and [57] At the and Masters Tournaments, Jack Nicklaus joined Palmer as an honorary co-starter for the event.[58] In , Gary Player joined them. Palmer announced in March that a lingering shoulder issue would prevent him from partaking in the tee shot.[59] Palmer was still in attendance for the ceremony.[60]

Following Palmer's death in , the ceremony featured tributes; his green jacket was draped over an empty white chair, while everyone in attendance wore "Arnie's Army" badges.[61][62]

In Lee Elder joined Nicklaus and Player as an honorary starter. He was invited to join them as he was the first African-American to take part in the Masters in Despite bad health preventing Elder from hitting a shot, he was still present and received a standing ovation from the crowd.

Champions' Dinner[edit]

The Champions' Dinner is held each year on the Tuesday evening preceding Thursday's first round. The dinner was first held in , hosted by defending champion Ben Hogan, to honor the past champions of the tournament.[63] At that time 15 tournaments had been played, and the number of past champions was Officially known as the "Masters Club", it includes only past winners of the Masters, although selected members of the Augusta National Golf Club have been included as honorary members, usually the chairman.

The defending champion, as host, selects the menu for the dinner. Frequently, Masters champions have served cuisine from their home regions prepared by the Masters chef. Notable examples have included haggis, served by ScotsmanSandy Lyle in ,[64] and bobotie, a South African dish, served at the behest of champion Trevor Immelman. Other examples include German Bernhard Langer's Wiener schnitzel, Britain's Nick Faldo's fish and chips, Canadian Mike Weir's elk and wild boar, and Vijay Singh's seafood tom kah and chicken panang curry. The dinner of Phil Mickelson was a Spanish-themed menu in hopes that Seve Ballesteros would attend, but he was too sick to attend and died weeks later.[65]

In , Tiger Woods after winning in served cheeseburgers, chicken sandwiches, french fries and milkshakes. Woods was the youngest winner, and when asked about his food choices, he responded with "They said you could pick anything you wantHey, it’s part of being young, that’s what I eat."[66] Woods' first Champions' Dinner did come with some controversy, even before the first burger hit the grill. Fuzzy Zoeller, the champion, created a media storm when he suggested that Woods refrain from serving collard greens and fried chicken, dishes commonly associated with African-American culture, at the dinner.

Caddies[edit]

Until , all players in the Masters were required to use the services of an Augusta National Club caddie,[67][68][69] who by club tradition was always an African-American man.[22] Club co-founder Clifford Roberts is reputed to have said, "As long as I'm alive, golfers will be white, and caddies will be black."[70] Since —six years after Roberts's death in —players have been allowed the option of bringing their own caddie to the tournament.

The Masters requires caddies to wear a uniform consisting of a white jumpsuit, a green Masters cap, and white tennis shoes. The surname, and sometimes first initial, of each player is found on the back of his caddie's uniform. The defending champion always receives caddie number "1": other golfers get their caddie numbers from the order in which they register for the tournament. The other majors and some PGA Tour events formerly had a similar policy concerning caddies well into the s;[71][72][73] the U.S. Open first allowed players to use their own caddies in [74][75]

Format[edit]

The Masters is the first major championship of the year. Since , its final round has been scheduled for the second Sunday of April, with several exceptions. It ended on the first Sunday four times (, , , ) and the and tournaments ended on April 15, the month's third Sunday.[4] The first edition in was held in late March and the next ten were in early April, with only the event scheduled to end on the second Sunday. The event, postponed by the COVID pandemic, was held from 12 to 15 November, thus being the last major of the year.

Similar to the other majors, the tournament consists of four rounds at 18 holes each, Thursday through Sunday (when there are no delays). The Masters has a relatively small field of contenders when compared with other golf tournaments, so the competitors play in groups of three for the first two rounds (36 holes) and the field is not split to start on the 1st and 10th tees unless weather shortens the available playing time. The tournament is unique in that it is the only major tournament conducted by a private club rather than a national golf organization like the PGA.[6]

Originally, the Masters was the only tournament to use two-man pairings during the first two rounds. It was also the only event to re-pair based on the leaderboard before Friday's round, as most tournaments only do this on the weekend. This practice ended in the early s when the Masters switched to the more standard three-man groups and the groups are now kept intact on Friday, with players sharing the same playing partners in both of the first two rounds.[citation needed]

After 36 holes of play, a cut-off score is calculated to reduce the size of the field for the weekend rounds. In , to "make the cut", players must be in the top 50 places (ties counting).[76] Before , there was no hole cut and all of the invitees played four rounds, if desired. From to , the top 40 scores (including ties) made the cut. From to , it was the top 44 (and ties) or within 10 strokes of the lead.[19] From to , it was the top 50 (and ties) or within 10 strokes of the lead.[77]

Following the cut, an additional 36 holes are played over the final two days. Should the fourth round fail to produce a winner, all players tied for the lead enter a sudden-death playoff. Play begins on the 18th hole, followed by the adjacent 10th, repeating until one player remains. Adopted in , the sudden-death playoff was originally formatted to start on the first hole,[78] but was not needed for the first three years. It was changed for to the inward (final) nine holes, starting at the tenth tee, where the television coverage began.[79] First employed that same year, the Masters' first sudden-death playoff, won by Fuzzy Zoeller, ended on the 11th green. The current arrangement, beginning at the 18th tee, was amended for and first used the following year. Through , the eleven sudden-death playoffs have yet to advance past the second extra hole. Earlier playoffs were 18 holes on the following day, except for the first in , which was 36 holes (Gene Sarazen defeated Craig Wood); the last hole playoff was in when Billy Casper defeated Gene Littler, and none of the full-round playoffs went to additional holes.

Course[edit]

The golf course was formerly a plant nursery and each hole is named after the tree or shrub with which it has become associated.[8]
The course layout in

Lengths of the course for the Masters at the start of each decade:

  • 7, yards (6,&#;m)
  • 7, yards (6,&#;m)
  • 6, yards (6,&#;m)
  • 6, yards (6,&#;m)
  • 7, yards (6,&#;m)
  • 6, yards (6,&#;m)
  • 6, yards (6,&#;m)
  • 6, yards (6,&#;m)
  • 6, yards (6,&#;m)[1]

The course was lengthened to 7, yards (6,&#;m) in The first hole was shortened by 10 yards (9&#;m) in The fifth hole was lengthened by 40 yards (37&#;m) for , resulting in the current length of 7, yards (6,&#;m).

Course adjustments[edit]

As with many other courses, Augusta National's championship setup was lengthened in recent years. In , the course measured 6, yards (6,&#;m) and was extended to 7, yards (6,&#;m) for , and again in to 7, yards (6,&#;m); yards (&#;m) longer than the course.[81][82] The changes attracted many critics, including the most successful players in Masters history, Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer, Gary Player and Tiger Woods. Woods claimed that the "shorter hitters are going to struggle." Augusta National chairman Hootie Johnson was unperturbed, stating, "We are comfortable with what we are doing with the golf course." After a practice round, Gary Player defended the changes, saying, "There have been a lot of criticisms, but I think unjustly so, now I've played it The guys are basically having to hit the same second shots that Jack Nicklaus had to hit (in his prime)".[83]

Originally, the grass on the putting greens was wide-bladed Bermuda. The greens lost speed, especially during the late s, after the introduction of a healthier strain of narrow-bladed Bermuda, which thrived and grew thicker. In , the greens on the par 3 course were reconstructed with bentgrass, a narrow-bladed species that could be mowed shorter, eliminating grain.[84] After this test run, the greens on the main course were replaced with bentgrass in time for the Masters. The bentgrass resulted in significantly faster putting surfaces, which has required a reduction in some of the contours of the greens over time.[84]

Just before the tournament, the common beige sand in the bunkers was replaced with the now-signature white feldspar. It is a quartz derivative of the mining of feldspar and is shipped in from North Carolina.[85]

In , the fifth hole was lengthened from yards to yards with two new gaping bunkers on the left side of the fairway.[86]

Field[edit]

The Masters has the smallest field of the major championships, with 90– players. Unlike other majors, there are no alternates or qualifying tournaments. It is an invitational event, with invitations largely issued on an automatic basis to players who meet published criteria. The top 50 players in the Official World Golf Ranking are all invited.[87]

Past champions are always eligible, but since the Augusta National Golf Club has discouraged them from continuing to participate at an advanced age. Some will later become honorary starters.[88]

Invitation categories
See footnote.[89]
Note: Categories 7–11 are honored only if the participants maintain their amateur status prior to the tournament.
  1. Masters Tournament Champions (lifetime)
  2. U.S. Open champions (five years)
  3. The Open champions (five years)
  4. PGA champions (five years)
  5. Winners of the Players Championship (three years)
  6. Current Olympic Gold Medalist (one year)
  7. Current U.S. Amateur champion and runner-up
  8. Current British Amateur champion
  9. Current Asia-Pacific Amateur champion
  10. Current U.S. Mid-Amateur champion
  11. Current Latin America Amateur champion
  12. The first 12 players, including ties, in the previous year's Masters Tournament
  13. The first 4 players, including ties, in the previous year's U.S. Open
  14. The first 4 players, including ties, in the previous year's Open Championship
  15. The first 4 players, including ties, in the previous year's PGA Championship
  16. Winners of PGA Tour regular-season and playoff events that award at least a full-point allocation for the FedEx Cup, starting with the RBC Heritage the week after the Masters to the Shell Houston Open the week beforehand.
  17. Those qualifying for the previous year's season-ending Tour Championship (top 30 in FedEx Cup prior to tournament)
  18. The 50 leaders on the Final Official World Golf Ranking for the previous calendar year
  19. The 50 leaders on the Official World Golf Ranking published during the week prior to the current Masters Tournament

Most of the top current players will meet the criteria of multiple categories for invitation. The Masters Committee, at its discretion, can also invite any golfer not otherwise qualified, although in practice these invitations are currently reserved for international players.[90]

Changes since

Changes for the tournament include invitations now being awarded to the autumn events in the PGA Tour, which now begin the wraparound season, tightening of qualifications (top 12 plus ties from the Masters, top 4 from the U.S. Open, Open Championship, and PGA Championship), and the top 30 on the PGA Tour now referencing the season-ending points before the Tour Championship, not the former annual money list.[77] The Masters added the winner of the newly established Latin America Amateur Championship, which effectively replaced the exemption for the U.S. Amateur Public Links, which ended after the tournament. (The final Public Links champion played in the Masters.)[91]

Champions[edit]

Main article: List of Masters Tournament champions

The first winner of the Masters Tournament was Horton Smith in , and he repeated in The player with the most Masters victories is Jack Nicklaus, who won six times between and Tiger Woods has five wins, followed by Arnold Palmer with four, and Jimmy Demaret, Gary Player, Sam Snead, Nick Faldo, and Phil Mickelson have three titles to their name. Player was the tournament's first overseas winner with his first victory in Two-time champions include Byron Nelson, Ben Hogan, Tom Watson, Seve Ballesteros, Bernhard Langer, Ben Crenshaw, José María Olazábal, and Bubba Watson.[92]

YearChampionScoreTo parMargin of
victory
Runner(s)-upWinner's
share ($)
JapanHideki Matsuyama−101 strokeUnited StatesWill Zalatoris2,,
United StatesDustin Johnson−205 strokesSouth KoreaIm Sung-jae
AustraliaCameron Smith
2,,
United StatesTiger Woods (5)−131 strokeUnited StatesDustin Johnson
United StatesBrooks Koepka
United StatesXander Schauffele
2,,
United StatesPatrick Reed−151 strokeUnited StatesRickie Fowler1,,
SpainSergio García−9PlayoffEnglandJustin Rose1,,
EnglandDanny Willett−53 strokesUnited StatesJordan Spieth
EnglandLee Westwood
1,,
United StatesJordan Spieth−184 strokesUnited StatesPhil Mickelson
EnglandJustin Rose
1,,
United StatesBubba Watson (2)−83 strokesSwedenJonas Blixt
United StatesJordan Spieth
1,,
AustraliaAdam Scott−9PlayoffArgentinaÁngel Cabrera1,,
United StatesBubba Watson−10PlayoffSouth AfricaLouis Oosthuizen1,,
South AfricaCharl Schwartzel−142 strokesAustraliaJason Day
AustraliaAdam Scott
1,,
United StatesPhil Mickelson (3)−163 strokesEnglandLee Westwood1,,
ArgentinaÁngel Cabrera−12PlayoffUnited StatesKenny Perry
United StatesChad Campbell
1,,
South AfricaTrevor Immelman−83 strokesUnited StatesTiger Woods1,,
United StatesZach Johnson+12 strokesSouth AfricaRetief Goosen
South AfricaRory Sabbatini
United StatesTiger Woods
1,,
United StatesPhil Mickelson (2)−72 strokesSouth AfricaTim Clark1,,
United StatesTiger Woods (4)−12PlayoffUnited StatesChris DiMarco1,,
United StatesPhil Mickelson−91 strokeSouth AfricaErnie Els1,,
CanadaMike Weir−7PlayoffUnited StatesLen Mattiace1,,
United StatesTiger Woods (3)−123 strokesSouth AfricaRetief Goosen1,,
United StatesTiger Woods (2)−162 strokesUnited StatesDavid Duval1,,
FijiVijay Singh−103 strokesSouth AfricaErnie Els,
SpainJosé María Olazábal (2)−82 strokesUnited StatesDavis Love III,
United StatesMark O'Meara−91 strokeUnited StatesFred Couples
United StatesDavid Duval
,
United StatesTiger Woods−1812 strokesUnited StatesTom Kite,
EnglandNick Faldo (3)−125 strokesAustraliaGreg Norman,
United StatesBen Crenshaw (2)−141 strokeUnited StatesDavis Love III,
SpainJosé María Olazábal−92 strokesUnited StatesTom Lehman,
GermanyBernhard Langer (2)−114 strokesUnited StatesChip Beck,
United StatesFred Couples−132 strokesUnited StatesRaymond Floyd,
WalesIan Woosnam−111 strokeSpainJosé María Olazábal,
EnglandNick Faldo (2)−10PlayoffUnited StatesRaymond Floyd,
EnglandNick Faldo−5PlayoffUnited StatesScott Hoch,
ScotlandSandy Lyle−71 strokeUnited StatesMark Calcavecchia,
United StatesLarry Mize−3PlayoffSpainSeve Ballesteros
AustraliaGreg Norman
,
United StatesJack Nicklaus (6)−91 strokeUnited StatesTom Kite
AustraliaGreg Norman
,
West GermanyBernhard Langer−62 strokesSpainSeve Ballesteros
United StatesRaymond Floyd
United StatesCurtis Strange
,
United StatesBen Crenshaw−112 strokesUnited StatesTom Watson,
SpainSeve Ballesteros (2)−84 strokesUnited StatesBen Crenshaw
United StatesTom Kite
90,
United StatesCraig Stadler−4PlayoffUnited StatesDan Pohl64,
United StatesTom Watson (2)−82 strokesUnited StatesJohnny Miller
United StatesJack Nicklaus
60,
SpainSeve Ballesteros−134 strokesUnited StatesGibby Gilbert
AustraliaJack Newton
55,
United StatesFuzzy Zoeller−8PlayoffUnited StatesEd Sneed
United StatesTom Watson
50,
South AfricaGary Player (3)−111 strokeUnited StatesRod Funseth
United StatesHubert Green
United StatesTom Watson
45,
United StatesTom Watson−122 strokesUnited StatesJack Nicklaus40,
United StatesRaymond Floyd−178 strokesUnited StatesBen Crenshaw40,
United StatesJack Nicklaus (5)−121 strokeUnited StatesJohnny Miller
United StatesTom Weiskopf
40,
South AfricaGary Player (2)−102 strokesUnited StatesDave Stockton
United StatesTom Weiskopf
35,
United StatesTommy Aaron−51 strokeUnited StatesJ. C. Snead30,
United StatesJack Nicklaus (4)−23 strokesAustraliaBruce Crampton
United StatesBobby Mitchell
United StatesTom Weiskopf
25,
United StatesCharles Coody−92 strokesUnited StatesJohnny Miller
United StatesJack Nicklaus
25,
United StatesBilly Casper−9PlayoffUnited StatesGene Littler25,
United StatesGeorge Archer−71 strokeUnited StatesBilly Casper
CanadaGeorge Knudson
United StatesTom Weiskopf
20,
United StatesBob Goalby−111 strokeArgentinaRoberto De Vicenzo20,
United StatesGay Brewer−81 strokeUnited StatesBobby Nichols20,
United StatesJack Nicklaus (3)EPlayoffUnited StatesTommy Jacobs (2nd)
United StatesGay Brewer (3rd)
20,
United StatesJack Nicklaus (2)−179 strokesUnited StatesArnold Palmer
South AfricaGary Player
20,
United StatesArnold Palmer (4)−126 strokesUnited StatesDave Marr
United StatesJack Nicklaus
20,
United StatesJack Nicklaus−21 strokeUnited StatesTony Lema20,
United StatesArnold Palmer (3)−8PlayoffSouth AfricaGary Player (2nd)
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masters_Tournament

Winners masters results past and

Sobel: What the Last 10 Years of Masters Trends and Data Could Say About the Masters Champion

Past performance is not an indicator of future results.

We all get it. Whether we’ve played the stock market or bet on sports, we all understand that just because something has happened previously there’s no determinant which assures it will happen again.

And yet, there are obviously times when we can learn from past results – when we can gather information and use that data to make an informed decision about predicting future events.

This was my theory behind looking at the pre-tournament odds for each of the past 10 editions of the Masters Tournament, searching for trends amongst the eventual winners.



According to golfodds.com, these are the final odds for each of those winners, along with their placement on the board. (Because Masters odds are posted so early before the tourney, the numbers often change drastically prior to the opening round; I’ve used the final odds in every instance.)

  • Patrick Reed 40/1, T
  • Sergio Garcia 30/1, T-9
  • Danny Willett, 50/1, T
  • Jordan Spieth, 10/1, 2nd
  • Bubba Watson, 20/1, T-6
  • Adam Scott, 25/1, T-6
  • Bubba Watson, 30/1, T
  • Charl Schwartzel, /1, T
  • Phil Mickelson, 10/1, 2nd
  • Angel Cabrera, /1, T

A few notable findings: Essentially, we’ve witnessed a lot of winners who were firmly on the radar without being “The Man To Beat” beforehand.

If we tally up these numbers from the past 10 years, we’ll find that winners’ odds are an average of 44/1, while they rank an average of on the board.

So, what does that mean in regard to this year’s tournament?

Well, it’s a bit inconclusive. The players who rank somewhere just after 14th on the current list includes the group at + – Francesco Molinari, Paul Casey, Tony Finau and Jason Day. If you want to try to base your winner simply on that ranking, well, you could probably do a lot worse.

That doesn’t account for the 44/1 number, though. If we want someone to fit that profile, we have to peruse all the way down to the 23rd name on the board, a guy who won this tournament just two years ago. Again, some pretty solid value in picking up a recent champion at +

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If those results really do serve as a predictor for what might happen this week, there are five potential names who are each capable of winning and fit the immediate profile.

But we shouldn’t stop there.

This exercise requires a little more process of elimination.

Now let’s examine those same numbers – without the outliers.

Let’s remove the two lowest and highest odds on the board over the past 10 years. That would be 10/1 wins from Spieth and Mickelson, and /1 (or higher) wins from Schwartzel and Cabrera.

Removing the outliers obviously alters the average numbers, too. The half-dozen winners left have been an average of /1 prior to the tourney and on the board beforehand.

Looking at this year’s event, that changes which players match up well with the averages.

Well, that /1 price once again brings the foursome of Molinari, Casey, Finau and Day into play. Seeing them at two different intervals in the same piece could leave some folks licking their chops. Those players at + split the difference with Xander Schauffele and two-time champion Bubba Watson, each of whom currently reside at +

As for being ranked an average of on the board going into the week, we get three more names who are right around that number currently. Jordan Spieth, Rickie Fowler and Tommy Fleetwood are each in the range, meaning they could follow part of that recent trend.

Before undertaking this project, I’d hoped that there was one individual name who fit the pattern perfectly.

Instead, we’re left with 10 different competitors who meet these trends in at least one way.

That might not have been the answer we were seeking beforehand, but it still might be answer. Based on what we’ve witnessed at Augusta National over the past decade, don’t be surprised if one of these 10 players – and not the tournament favorite – winds up sliding his arms into a green jacket on Sunday evening.

Some way, somehow, they each fit the profile.

How would you rate this article?

Sours: https://www.actionnetwork.com/golf/masters-odds-preview-betting-historical-trends-data
A Champion's Gift of Golf

List of Masters Tournament champions

Wikipedia list article

Jack Nicklaus, six-time Masters champion in , , , , , and , which is a record, is one of three golfers to successfully defend his title. He is also one of five champions to win wire-to-wire, in

The Masters Tournament is a golf competition that was established in , with Horton Smith winning the inaugural tournament.[1] The Masters is the first of four major championships to be played each year, with the final round of the Masters always being scheduled for the second Sunday in April.[2] The Masters is the only one of the four majors to use the same course every year; the Augusta National Golf Club.[3] Masters champions are automatically invited to play in the other three majors (the U.S. Open, the Open Championship (British Open), and the PGA Championship) for the next five years, and earn a lifetime invitation to the Masters. They also receive membership on the PGA Tour for the following five seasons and invitations to the Players Championship for the five years following their victory.[4] The champion also receives the "Green Jacket", the first one being won by Sam Snead in The champion takes the jacket home for a year and returns it thereafter. A multiple champion will only have one jacket unless his size changes dramatically.[5]

Jack Nicklaus holds the record for the most Masters victories, winning the tournament six times during his career. Nicklaus is also the oldest winner of the Masters: he was 46 years 82 days old when he won in [6] Nicklaus, Nick Faldo, and Tiger Woods co-hold the record for most consecutive victories with two. Woods was the youngest winner of the Masters, 21 years days old when he won in [6] Woods also set the record for the widest winning margin (12 strokes). The lowest winning score, with , under-par, was scored by Dustin Johnson in [7]

The highest winning score of (+1) was originally set by Sam Snead in , it was equalled by Jack Burke Jr. in , and Zach Johnson in [8] Five golfers have won the Masters wire-to-wire; Craig Wood in , Arnold Palmer in , Nicklaus in , Raymond Floyd in , and Jordan Spieth in [9] Other players have led wire-to-wire if ties after a round are included, most recently Dustin Johnson in the Masters Tournament. Hideki Matsuyama is the current champion. He won the Masters Tournament with a score of (−10).[10]

Champions[edit]

By year[edit]

Arnold Palmer, four-time Masters Champion , , , and He is one of five champions to win wire-to-wire with his victory in
Tiger Woods, five-time Masters Champion in , , , , and Tiger is one of three golfers to successfully defend his title
Sam Snead, three-time Masters Champion in , ,
Gary Player, three-time Masters Champion in , , and
Nick Faldo, three-time Masters Champion in , , and , and is one of three golfers to successfully defend his title

Multiple champions[edit]

By nationality[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

General

Specific

  1. ^"Significant Dates". Masters. Archived from the original on April 16, Retrieved April 21,
  2. ^"A Special Sunday". Augusta. April 11, Archived from the original on April 19, Retrieved April 20,
  3. ^"Augusta's Special Aura". BBC Sport. April 5, Retrieved March 20,
  4. ^"The Masters". Your Golf Travel. Retrieved March 19,
  5. ^"US Masters: Did You Know?". BBC Sport. April 2, Retrieved March 3,
  6. ^ ab"Historical Records & Stats". Augusta National. Retrieved April 12,
  7. ^ ab"Dustin Johnson wins Masters at record under ". Associated Press. November 15, Retrieved November 20,
  8. ^"Scoring Statistics". Masters. Archived from the original on April 24, Retrieved April 21,
  9. ^"Historical Records & Stats". Masters. Retrieved April 15,
  10. ^ abBysouth, Alex (April 12, ). "Masters Hideki Matsuyama claims one-shot victory at Augusta National". BBC Sport. Retrieved April 12,
  11. ^ ab"Scoring". BBC Sport. September 16, Retrieved September 23,
  12. ^" Horton Smith wins first Masters Tournament". The Augusta Chronicle. March 21, Retrieved September 4,
  13. ^ ab"The Shot of a Lifetime". The New York Times. Associated Press. April 7, Retrieved September 4,
  14. ^"Historic Leaderboard: Masters". The Augusta Chronicle. Retrieved September 4,
  15. ^Bonk, Thomas (September 27, ). "Byron Nelson, 94; Set Pro Golf Record of 11 Consecutive Tournament Wins". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 4,
  16. ^"Historic Leaderboard: Masters". The Augusta Chronicle. Retrieved September 4,
  17. ^" Ralph Guldahl wins Masters after consecutive second place finishes". The Augusta Chronicle. March 21, Retrieved September 4,
  18. ^"Historic Leaderboard: Masters". The Augusta Chronicle. Retrieved September 18,
  19. ^Iannone, Jason (April 9, ). "Top 5 Historic Moments At The Masters". CBS Atlanta. Retrieved September 18,
  20. ^" Byron Nelson wins last Masters before World War II". The Augusta Chronicle. March 21, Retrieved September 18,
  21. ^ abcdeGarrity, John (March 8, ). "Ben Hogan and Byron Nelson Dueled in a Masters Playoff for the Ages in ". Golf Magazine. Retrieved September 18,
  22. ^"Historic Leaderboard: Masters". The Augusta Chronicle. Retrieved September 18,
  23. ^"Historic Leaderboard: Masters". The Augusta Chronicle. Retrieved September 18,
  24. ^Berry, John (March 31, ). "It was a special moment for Harmon at Masters". Lake County Record-Bee. Retrieved September 18,
  25. ^"Classic Masters moments". ESPN Classic. November 19, Retrieved September 18,
  26. ^"Historic Leaderboard: Masters". The Augusta Chronicle. Retrieved September 25,
  27. ^"Historic Leaderboard: Masters". The Augusta Chronicle. Retrieved September 25,
  28. ^" Snead wins highest-scoring Masters". The Augusta Chronicle. March 22, Retrieved September 25,
  29. ^Wright, Alfred (April 5, ). "The Man Who Casts The Longest Shadow". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved September 25,
  30. ^ ab" Snead wins in legendary Masters battle with Hogan". The Augusta Chronicle. March 22, Retrieved September 25,
  31. ^" Middlecoff wins first Masters, second major". The Augusta Chronicle. March 22, Retrieved September 25,
  32. ^Campbell, Steve (April 2, ). "50 years ago Burke snuck off with the Masters". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved September 25,
  33. ^"Historic Leaderboard: Masters". The Augusta Chronicle. Retrieved September 25,
  34. ^Gorant, Jim (March 18, ). " Masters: Arnie's Army is born". Golf Magazine. Retrieved September 25,
  35. ^"Historic Leaderboard: Masters". The Augusta Chronicle. Retrieved September 25,
  36. ^"Historic Leaderboard: Masters". The Augusta Chronicle. Retrieved October 2,
  37. ^"Historic Leaderboard: Masters". The Augusta Chronicle. Retrieved October 2,
  38. ^"Historic Leaderboard: Masters". The Augusta Chronicle. Retrieved October 2,
  39. ^"Historic Leaderboard: Masters". The Augusta Chronicle. Retrieved October 2,
  40. ^" Arnold Palmer cruises to Masters win". The Augusta Chronicle. March 22, Retrieved October 2,
  41. ^Atkin, Ross (April 8, ). "The Glories of Golf Play Out in Masters". The Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved October 2,
  42. ^ a
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Masters_Tournament_champions

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