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Dell Latitude E6410 ATG review: Dell Latitude E6410 ATG

More beast than beauty

Built to the US military's MIL-STD-810G standard, the E6410 is pretty ugly, but that's usually the case when it comes to ruggedised machines. The whole chassis has been reinforced with metal and, as a result, it's quite chunky, measuring 40mm thick. The matte black lid has a textured surface that should help protect against scratches. Most of the ports are covered with flip-down rubber stoppers to help keep dust particles out.

Inside, the laptop looks very similar to other Latitude models, with a matte black finish and small grilles over the speakers that are placed either side of the keyboard. The keyboard uses traditional tapered keys and doesn't include a numerical keypad. But it's very comfortable to use, thanks to its rock-solid build quality and the significant amount of travel in the keys.

As with most of Dell's business machines, the E6410 has both a pointer and a trackpad. The pointer is pleasingly responsive. Although the trackpad is small, its smooth surface feels just right under your finger. But the trackpad buttons are set too far into the chassis for our liking -- your thumb tends to rub against the edge of the laptop when you press them.

It's not just the trackpad and pointer that can be used to control the laptop -- this model has a touchscreen display too. This uses resistive technology, but it's fairly sensitive to touch input, so it's good at registering lighter taps. It doesn't support multi-touch gestures, though, so you can't pinch your fingers together to zoom in on pictures, maps and Web pages.

The screen is LED-backlit, which makes it very bright, and the anti-glare coating helps to cut down on reflections. Its resolution of 1,280x800 pixels isn't exactly amazing, but, as this model is likely to spend a good deal of time outdoors, extra brightness is probably more important than a crisper resolution.

The laptop's connectivity is pretty good, including Wi-Fi and Bluetooth support. You also get four USB ports, both VGA and DisplayPort outputs, a Smart Card reader and a mini-FireWire socket. Storage needs are taken care of by a 250GB hard drive with a free-fall sensor, and there's also a DVD writer.

Barnstorming performance

The E6410 is available in a choice of three different processor configurations. Our model came with the highest-specification CPU -- a dual-core Intel Core i7-620M clocked at 2.66GHz. This is helped along by 4GB of RAM.

Given its meaty specification, we were expecting the E6410 to post a pretty impressive score in the PCMark05 benchmark test. Thankfully, it didn't disappoint, racking up a blistering 8,119 points. You'll have no problem using this machine to multitask, even with the most demanding applications.

Laptops aimed at business users generally rely on integrated graphics and that's the case here -- the E6410 makes do with an integrated Intel HD chip. As you'd expect, this didn't score all that well in the 3DMark06 test. It only managed to push the laptop to a result of 2,055, which means it's not a great machine for 3D business applications, like rendering or CAD applications, but it will deal with most other graphical duties without any problems.

For a laptop that's likely to be used on the go, the E6410's battery performance is disappointing. In the Battery Eater Classic test, it managed to keep running for 1 hour and 31 minutes, which is average for a laptop with a 14-inch screen. That said, the Battery Eater test runs the processor at full tilt to simulate a very heavy workload, so, under real-world conditions, its battery is likely to last significantly longer. If you need longer battery life, you can always go for the optional nine-cell battery, which adds an extra £53 to the price.

Conclusion

The Dell Latitude E6410 ATG is certainly one tough cookie, and it's blisteringly fast performance is also highly impressive. We think it's a good choice if you need a machine that you can use in challenging work environments.

Edited by Charles Kloet 

Sours: https://www.cnet.com/reviews/dell-latitude-e6410-atg-review/

Review Dell Latitude E6410 Notebook

Working faster. We are facing a representative of Dell's high-end "mainstream" range of Latitude Business notebooks. Equipped with powerful components (Core i7, SSD), the 14 inch laptop is recommendable for ambitioned business users with mobility needs.

J. Simon Leitner,

The current model range's predecessor, the Latitude E6400, could already convince in our test in many respects. The device equals the Precision M2400 in many points, but it has a considerably stronger graphic unit. Whilst the 14 incher's workstation alternative is recurrently available almost unchanged, Dell now offers its business all-rounder in an updated form (E6x10).

At first glance, the case hasn't actually changed much. Inside, however, the latest components have been used - from the top-of-the-range company Intel in this case. For example, a Core i7-620M CPU provides for the appropriate power under the hood in our test device. Naturally, there are also weaker and thus less expensive versions available due to Dell's build-to-order principle. They are configured either via the online shop or by telephone. Occasionally, you can also find preconfigured bundles in various shops.
We have tested a device intended for the UK market, and which has a few country-specific characteristics in the key layout, but otherwise is easily comparable with models designed for other countries - provided that the configuration is compliant.

Apart from configurational differences (fingerprint reader), you'll see yourself facing the same case in the model at hand, as for instance in the older E6400. Consequently, the latest edition has also inherited all strengths and weakness of the case, available for some time.

An outstanding pro argument is definitely the superior case stability given. You'll only find metal components on the surface, which also enhances the notebook's haptic. A look inside the laptop, which by the way is done quickly and easily by removing only a single screw on the base unit's bottom (the removable cover grants access to all components), also reveals the application of quality materials and metal alloys of the otherwise usually concealed parts. Dell cites a "Tri-Metal casing" in this connection.

The E6410 doesn't show itself impressed by the selective pressure test. Only unusually high pressure can provoke slight, irrelevant deformations in some areas. The display makes an especially exemplary impression, as it doesn't allow any image distortions under applied pressure, despite its slim build of merely eight millimeters. In reference to this, we also have to mention the commendable hinges, which are made of one solid piece of metal and always keep the screen in position with the right amount of tension.

Perhaps a few words about the laptop's design. The Latitude E6410 tries to score with plain, straight forms and thus uses a matt black finish generously. Nevertheless, the silver coated surface, which imitates a brushed metal texture, gives it a certain optical charm in a closed state. The silver hinges and the battery's silver gray accentuation over the back edge down to the notebooks bottom are also appealing.
Alternately to our "Silver Back Cover" version, there is also a blue and red cover available. They have a surcharge of 25 euro each.

The case's, perhaps somewhat premature aforementioned, weaknesses remain. Well, the only complaint that the tester has, is the soundscape while handling the notebook. But no need to worry. Apart from a slightly wobbly battery everything fits tight in the case. However, slight clatter noises can turn up when the laptop is placed on a hard surface, which are likely mainly caused by the keyboard.

Connectivity

If the current test model is compared to the Latitude E6400 reviewed in November, you'll be slightly surprised to see that virtually nothing has changed in the scope and type of given ports. If this is to be rated as something positive or less positive is dependent on the individual requirements of every user. On the whole, we can again issue the Latitude E6410 a good rating.

The positioning of the single ports contributes decisively to this verdict. Dell uses the back third of the lateral edges and the rear (despite the centrally placed battery) consistently for the alignment of built-in interfaces. This is again differentiated between mainly permanently used interfaces (LAN, display port, power supply), which are all found on the rear and thus won't obstruct the work area beside the notebook. The other ports (VGA, 3 USBs, eSATA, Firewire and Audio) are found well visible and distributed over the lateral edges.

Front: Cardreader
Left: Kensington, VGA, USB, eSATA, SmartCard
Rear: Modem (optional), LAN, display port, DC-in
Right: PCCard/ExpressCard, Firewire, module bay, audio, 2 USB 2.0's

Beyond this configuration, Dell's Latitude E6410 also has a few other, typical business features. The docking port on the case's bottom would be mentioned here. The E-family's docking solutions are compatible, starting with the E-Legacy Extender (56.90 euro) over the E-Port up to the E-Port Plus (177.90 euro). This has two DVI and two display ports among other things. Dell states the maximum possible resolution for external devices via the E6410's digital port with 2560x1600 pixels (32bpp/60Hz).

The E6410 supplies extension options in form of a Media Card Reader (SD, MMC, SDHC, SDHS, miniSD, microSD), a 54mm PC Card or ExpressCard slot on the case's right side (either/or selection in configuration) and the modular drive bay. The notebook can be equipped with various optical drives (DVD, +/- RW, BD-RE) here. Naturally, an additional battery can be used. Weight can also be easily saved when provided with an according cover (Travel Lite Module).
A HDD adapter, which would make an attractive SSD-HDD combination possible, is unfortunately not available.

Communication

The Latitude E6420 hardly leaves anything to be desired in terms of communication in its configuration options. The most different WLAN modules are available, for example from Intel or Dell's own. An Intel Centrino Ultimate-N 6300 module was built into our test example, for instance.
An Intel 82577 gigabit Ethernet controller provides for an appropriately fast connection to your home or business network on the wired side. Aside from that, there is also an increasingly rare V.92 modem optionally available. It wasn't built into our test device and the corresponding RJ-11 port was closed with a cover.

But as if that's not enough. Bluetooth (v3.0) can also be ordered in the configuration, but, is usually already built-in ex-factory. It looks different in regards to mobile internet broadband, which is available for the E6410 according to the data sheet (Dell Wireless 5620 (EVDO+HSPA+AGPS) or Dell Wireless 5540 (HSPA+AGPS)), but isn't listed in the online shop. A configuration by telephone could help here, if required.
The configuration with WiMax 802.16e should rather be of interest for customers in the United States.

Security

The Latitude E6410 has a range of security features, which makes the notebook especially interesting for professional users and major customers. Not seen very often, for instance, is the SmartCard Reader. The contactless reading of a SmartCard is also supported, whereas the correlating field is also accordingly marked on the touchpad's right.

A fingerprint reader can also be ordered optionally. The FIPS Reader with an enhanced security standard is only available for the E6510 according to Dell. The Trusted Platform Module (TPM) and a Kensington lock belong to the standard hardware configuration.

Of course, guarantee and warranty belong to security matters. A three year onsite service for the next workday belongs to Dell's basics for business notebooks. Upgrades in regards to range of service are also possible, but the warranty is limited to three years according to information in the shop. Additionally, various services such as data recovery, data deletion, battery service and an accident insurance in the most different variations for up to 3 years can be ordered.

Keyboard

Basically, the same keyboard unit is built into the Latitude E6410 as already in the predecessor, E6400. However, our UK test device proved to have the expected differences in the mapping of single keys. If you order from Germany, you'll naturally get the country-specific layout. All models have the now illuminated keyboard in common, which is noticed positively especially in unfavorable light conditions.

The key size is still very generous, whereas you can take delight in well-sized shift, alt and control keys. The arrow keys are also pleasant to use. They have been separated slightly from the rest of the keyboard and have a normal key size.

Typing on the keyboard is easy and without notable error rates. We especially liked the distinct pressure point, the well-sized stroke length and the pleasant soundscape, even during a somewhat more vigorous typing.

Touchpad

Dell integrates two input options as a mobile mouse replacement right away. For one thing, you'll find a touchpad that distinguishes itself by its especially gliding-eager surface and a very good response. For another, the Latitude also has a TrackStick, which allows navigating without readjusting and thus has a clear advantage in certain applications.
However, the TrackStick didn't completely convince us in practical use. The TrackStick's texture can't keep the finger from slipping off, which makes the aforementioned readjusting necessary here. The not quite convincing responsiveness is likely due to that, too.

Keyboard
Touchpad/TrackStick

Dell Latitude ON

Like most various systems of other manufacturers, the Dell Latitude/Always ON is supposed to grant a faster access to various data and functions as it would be possible when the entire system is booted. This seems reasonable for slow systems, but what does it look like for powerful configurations like the E6420 at hand?

Our stop watch measured about 20 seconds until the login screen with Dell's Always ON appears at start up. Then a few second pass by again before the working surface appears, after entering the password.
Now the comparison run: If the system is rebooted from a shutdown state, a bit more than 30 seconds pass by before Windows is available for other tasks.

Dell Latitude ON

Thus, we question the benefit of this function. The speed gain might possibly be greater in slower systems (HDD). In configurations with an SSD you are, however, definitely better off with booting the operating system, as you then have all options available after booting, in opposition to Always ON, where you have to be content with simple features like mail, internet, music, etc.

Dell still has two different display alternatives available for its 14 inch Latitude. Two 16:10 screens with a resolution of 1280x800 or 1440x900 pixels can be chosen from. Both models are LED screens with a matt display surface. Dell charges an additional 70 euro for the WXGA+ display with a higher resolution in the online shop. Professional users are well advised to sooner choose the WXGA+ screen, already because of the gain of overview on the display (more room to work with multiple windows).

This display was also used in our test device. It was an AUO4147 display to be precise. The maximum assessed brightness was a good 274 cd/m2 in the display's center area. We could record the lowest brightness in the lower center measuring quadrant (211 cd/m2), which results in an only below average illumination of 77%. Visible dimming couldn't be observed.

The utilized display also has to accept criticism in terms of contrast. The screen can only reach a maximum contrast ratio of 161:1 with a relatively high black value of 1.7 cd/m2. This is also visible to the naked eye in dark image content, making black look rather grayish.

232
cd/m²
231
cd/m²
248
cd/m²
245
cd/m²
274
cd/m²
258
cd/m²
251
cd/m²
211
cd/m²
246
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness

Maximum: 274 cd/m² Average: 244 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 77 %
Center on Battery: 274 cd/m²
Contrast: 161:1 (Black: 1.7 cd/m²)

The color representation quality is naturally a decisive factor in a high-end business notebook. Therefore, the built-in screen has to face a test with the Spyder 3 calibration tool.
The WXGA+ display's representable color space turns out average. Thus, the MacBook 2010 has a comparable range, for example. The tested Latitude E6410's display has to admit defeat in comparison to a FullHD screen (sRGB). Professional image editors likely won't be satisfied with it, but the color representation quality should be sufficient for all other applications.

Color space E6410 WXGA+
E6510 FHD (t) vs. E6410 WXGA+
MacBook 2010 (t) vs. E6410 WXGA+
Suitable for outdoor use:
no matter if in the shade or in sunlight

A possible outdoor suitability is of course also interesting for a compact office notebook. Due to the maximum brightness and matt display surface, the E6410 already fulfills two crucial requirements. The practical test in sunlight also confirms this: The Latitude E6410 supplies a premium, working suitable image in both shade and direct sunlight.

Whilst narrower viewing angles are possible from the horizontal field of vision, allowing 2-3 people to follow content on the display side by side, annoying color changes and especially an increasing contrast loss already turn up at the slightest deviation from the ideal, perpendicular viewing angle on the vertical plane. Thus, it may be necessary to not only correct the opening angle in mobile use, but also in stationary use.

Dell Latitude E6410's viewing angles

As already mentioned in the beginning, Dell's Latitude E6410 is available in a range of various configurations. Some alternatives aren't available in the online configurator, so you'll also have to call in if required. According to the data sheet, the E6410 can be equipped with Intel Core i5 and i7 Arrendale CPUs, so dual-core chips. The strongest available CPU is, therefore, the i7-620m, which is also used in our test device.

You can choose amongst the Intel GMA HD integrated on the processor unit and the dedicated Nvidia NVS 3100M as the graphic card. Whilst, the integrated graphic solution manages basic tasks, i.e. Windows Aero effects and video rendering, the NVS 3100M can provide a bit more performance reserves in terms of 3D representation and in decoding video material.

Nevertheless, the Quadro NVS 3100M is only a starter graphic card that is attuned for professional use in regards to drivers, and therefore has been tested for various CAD applications. But it shouldn't consequently be overrated in terms of performance capabilities. The power consumption of up to 14W (structurally identical to G210M/G310M) is also contra productive, especially during mobile use of the notebook.

System info
HDTune
DPC Latency Checker

System information Dell Latitude E6410

An indicator for the graphic card's performance is, for example, the OpenGL Shading test in Cinebench R10. The E6410 reaches a good result of 2087 points for the equipment in the configuration we had. In comparison, devices with a NVS 3100M graphics achieve up to 3500 points (Lenovo T510), which represents a bonus of 71%.

Even if it's rather more aligned on games, the 3DMark from Futuremark also provides information about the performance potential of the utilized graphic card. The notebook takes a place below comparably equipped models with 3356 points in 3DMark 2005. A blatant difference between integrated graphic chips and dedicated graphic solutions can also be seen in the rates. In comparison, the Nvidia NVS 3100M can again take the lead with results up a bit over 7000 points. This represents a plus of over 100%.

Cinebench R10 Rendering Single 32Bit

3470

Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 32Bit

7450

Cinebench R10 Shading 32Bit

2087

Help

... in comparison

3DMark 2001SE Standard10934 points
3DMark 03 Standard4933 points
3DMark 05 Standard3356 points

Help

Aside from the GPU-biased benchmarks, a range of tests for evaluating the application performance is available. The Cinebench Rendering Test, assesses the CPU during rendering a scene with assistance of either only one core/thread or with all available units. As expected, the Core i7-620M CPU takes place in the far front of the statistics in the single-core rendering exercise, as it can overclock a single core up to 3.33 GHz due to Intel Turbo Boost. Thus, even powerful quad-cores can learn to dread.

The tide turns in the multi-core test, though. The i7-620M has four threads available, but the latest Intel Clarksfield chips, for example, can take the lead with over 10000 points due to 8 parallel threads. Nevertheless, the Latitude E6410 also does well in this exercise, especially in view of the compact design, and achieves a respectable result of 7450 points.

Windows 7 performance index, for example, helps assessing the performance balance of utilized components. Aside from top rates for CPU, RAM and hard disk, the graphic solution unsurprisingly turns out to be a possible bottleneck.

Finally, we put the Latitude E6410 through the PCMark Vantage benchmark test, which evaluates the system's total performance with several different tests. And see there, the notebook almost places itself at the top of all notebooks we have ever reviewed with a proud 9753 points as a total score. Merely gaming machines, like Alienware's M17x or the mySN XMG8.c, could achieve a marginally better score. Interesting: the Latitude E6410 can also top the convincing Lenovo Thinkpad T410s, however with a Core i5-520M (9047 points) and its bigger brother, the E6510 (also with a SSD).

PCMark Vantage Result9753 points

Help

4.2

Windows 7 Experience Index

Processor

Calculations per second

6.5

Memory (RAM)

Memory operations per second

7.2

Graphics

Desktop performance for Windows Aero

4.2

Gaming graphics

3D business and gaming graphics

5.2

Primary hard disk

Disk data transfer rate

7.3

Transfer Rate Minimum: 103 MB/s

Transfer Rate Maximum: 129.1 MB/s

Transfer Rate Average: 120.6 MB/s

Access Time: 0.3 ms

Burst Rate: 84.2 MB/s

CPU Usage: 10 %

The last point of our performance evaluation is traditionally dedicated to the built-in mass memory. It's one of the components mainly responsible for the excellent rating of single benchmarks in the E6410. A solid state drive (SSD) from Samsung, called PB22-J/PM800, is used in our test device. The SSD in a 2.5" size has a capacity of 256 gigabytes and is currently separately sold for a market price of about 550 euro. In view of this, Dell's surcharge of 580 euro for a fast 7200 rpm/320GB HDD seems almost fair.

The general benefits of a SSD in comparison to a HDD should have been spread around by now. You can find detailed information in our HDD vs. SSD article. Summarizing: a SSD bids a silent operating, a lower power consumption, less waste heat, considerably faster transfer rates and access rates in comparison to a HDD and beyond that it's also absolutely shock resistant. Disadvantage: the high acquisition price of ca. 2-3 euro per gigabyte of capacity.

The data carrier's benchmark's impressively show the benefits of its utilization. Read rates of over 200 MB/s and write rates of up to 170 MB/s at an access rate of 0.3 milliseconds wipe out the benchmarks of common, mechanical hard disks many times over.
The user doesn't only get to feel that when copying files. All latencies caused by accessing the memory, e.g. system boot, starting programs, search for documents or mails, etc., run significantly faster than it would be the case for a common hard disk. The notebook's subjectively perceived speed can thus benefit tremendously.

AS SSD Benchmark
ATTO Disk Benchmark
CrystalDiskMark 2.2

System Noise

As a rule, the choice of especially powerful components can have a negative effect in some areas. The laptop's noise emissions are an important aspect. Therefore, we were more than surprised when the notebook remained mainly silent in idle mode and simple office load. Every now and again, the fan started up at a still very low level of 32.7 dB(A) and ran for a few minutes to only finally fall silent for a longer time.

Even a consistent utilization of the main components in the stress test only increased the noise level to a still acceptable 35.5 dB(A). DVD rendering runs just as pleasantly quiet with 35.4 dB(A).

Noise Level

Idle

28.6 / 28.6 / 32.7 dB(A)

HDD 28.6 dB(A)
DVD 35.7 / 47.4 dB(A)
Load 34.6 / 35.5 dB(A)
 red to green bar
 

 

30 dB
silent

40 dB(A)
audible

50 dB(A)
loud

 
min: dark, med: mid, max: light    (15 cm distance)

Temperature

The idea to accept a somewhat warmer case in favor of a lower system noise is principally alright, but doesn't really apply to the Dell Latitude E6410. The case always remained within a green field with surface temperatures of a bit under or over 30°C in idle mode over several hours.

We first recorded a maximum laptop temperature of 42.7°C on the base unit's bottom, and 38.1°C in the keyboard's center in the stress test. Subjectively, the notebook already gets noticeably warm here, but this extreme situation represents an exceptional situation which will hardly be met in practical use.

The CPU achieved a maximum temperature of 85°C and thus remains significantly below the maximum admissible rate. Both CPU cores ran constantly with 2.66 GHz without noticeable throttle-breakdowns under load.

Aside from the used components, the battery life is also directly linked to the single battery used. Dell has a whole range of battery solution for the Latitude E6410. For example, choosing a 3 cell (37Wh), 6 cell (60Wh) and a 9 cell 90Wh main battery is possible. Beyond that, the notebook can be extended by a capacity of 88 Wh with an additional battery, which is docked to the laptop's bottom ("extended battery slice"). Price: 299 dollars. Alternately, there is also a battery for the modular drive bay available - 48Wh for 135 dollars. Interestingly, both options are only currently listed in the US American version of the online shop.

Theoretically, the Dell Latitude can be upgraded to be an endurance machine with the aforesaid options. But it's not cheap. Our test device had the 6 cell battery intended for the standard configuration and was flush on the rear. The 9 cell battery with 50% more capacity (the runtimes also range in this field) is currently priced with a surcharge of 65 euro, and should be considered by mobile users in any case.

Our test configuration achieved 325 minutes, so almost 6.5 hours, in the maximum possible battery life test (BatteryEater Reader's test). The "worst case scenario", so operating under load, is simulated with the BatteryEater Classic test and indicates 72 minutes of battery runtime for the laptop.

The notebook achieved a good runtime of 262 minutes in a true-to-life WLAN surf use with selected energy savings mode and slightly reduced brightness. We looked at various websites enhanced with flash animations and the odd video playing for this test. The DVD rendering test turned out a bit disappointing. Merely 115 minutes could be recorded, which is just enough for a short Hollywood movie.

Battery Runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)5h 25min
WiFi Surfing4h 22min
DVD1h 55min
Load (maximum brightness)1h 12min

The already obvious difference between the minimum and maximum battery life gets even more evident in the analysis of the notebook's power consumption. The notebook only treats itself to 8.6W in optimal settings (min. display brightness, communication modules off, energy savings mode). The power consumption is within a range of 12 and 18W in the usual office mode.

We could record a maximum power consumption of 53.7W under CPU and graphic chip load. The 90W adapter can thus cope with that easily. Even its maximum temperature of 51.4°C is okay.

Basically, there hasn't been much changed in view of the existing Latitude Latitude E6400. The existing strengths have been maintained and even improved. The weaknesses already noted in the predecessor have unfortunately been kept. This especially applies to the given display resolution. The WXGA+ model we tested allows an unobjectionable use outdoors in all kinds of weather, but the displayed image isn't convincing when high demands are put on the color quality. The given contrast is too low, the displayed image too viewing angle dependent and the representable color space too slight for professional photo and graphic applications.
This isn't as annoying for the average business customer, as he can be satisfied with a useable overview due to the WXGA+ resolution and an image not distorted by any light effects.

The tested configuration's performance with an Intel i7 CPU and Samsung SSD turned out first-rate. Not only the achieved benchmarks speak for themselves, but also the subjectively perceived work speed is still looking for its equal. A pleasantly quiet work surrounding with manageable heat emissions can be added.

The extensive individualization options in many areas are definitely a great advantage of the Latitude E6410. This starts with the looks (interchangeable cover) over the hardware component configuration (CPU; GPU, HDD/SSD, RAM) and the communication modules (HSPA, WiMax, etc), up to the numerous available battery solutions. All of this has its price, but allows the option of an uniquely, ideally adapted device with everyday business qualities.

Dell Latitude E6410

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Dell Latitude

Brand of laptop

Latitude E5570 with its back cover open.
Seven members of the Latitude D-series. From left to right; Bottom Row: D400, D410, D420, D505; Top Row: D610, D820, D830.

Latitude is a line of business-oriented laptops manufactured and sold by Dell Technologies aimed at corporate enterprises, healthcare, government, and education markets. The Latitude directly competes with the ThinkPad series from IBM/Lenovo and the EliteBook series from HP. Additionally, the "Rugged (Extreme)", "XFR" and "ATG" models compete primarily with Panasonic's Toughbook line of rugged computers.

Overview and product type[edit]

The Dell Latitude series have dropped the initial alphabet in newer model types (as in Latitude 7480 whose predecessor was E7470), and became the successor to the popular Latitude E, D, C, and X series. The Latitudes from the early 1990s up until the C*00 lines weren't in a set "series", instead of going under the models CP and XP with modifiers at the end, e.g.: XPi, CP M233.

In the past, the high-end line was the 6 series, being the C6x0, D6x0, and E64x0 lines, but as of 2015 this line has been discontinued and replaced by both the 5 series and the 7 series. The 15" "Premium" line was the 8 series, until the E-series merged this line with the 6 series (Model numbers being along the lines of C8x0 or D8x0). The entry-level line was the 5 series, but as of 2015 the 5 series and 7 series Latitude laptops are the primary lines of Latitude laptops. The 3 series has replaced the 5 series as the budget line. Dell has also since dropped the E from the Latitude line (due to switching to a USB C/Thunderbolt dock system, rather than the e-Port analog pin-system docks), and the models are delineated by number now, e.g.: Latitude 5480, 5570. The second number in the model (As in, 5470 or 7280) indicates the size of the screen on the laptop.

The current Dell Latitude lineup is as follows:

  • Latitude 3xxx series. Budget models intended for education and small businesses, available in 13.3"/14"/15.6" trims.
  • Latitude 5xxx series. Mainstream line. Replaces the 6000 series and shares same chassis with Mobile workstation models. available in 11.1"/12.5"/13.3"/14"/15.6" trims.
  • Latitude 7xxx series. "Premium" Ultrabooks, available in 12.5"/13.3"/14" trims only.
  • Latitude 9xxx series. "Ultra-premium" laptops and 2-in-1s. Available with 14 and 15 inch displays and are the first laptops featuring 5G WWAN[1]

Latitude computers are also differentiated in their feature sets, due to their business focus. For example, they often include security features such as smartcard and contactless smartcard, and TPM security, vPro and AMD Dash management, DisplayPort (as opposed to HDMI), Docking stations and support for legacy standards are all results of the requirements of the business market.

Some models also have the capability of Latitude ON which can be selected during the configuration of the laptop. Latitude ON is essentially a system within a system. It requires a separate add on module which contains its own microprocessor and Operating system. This allows the laptop to function in the realm of a Netbook.

Current models[edit]

Latitude 2010-2021
Type **00

(2010)

**10

(2011)

**20

(2012)

**30

(2013)

**40

(2014)

**50/60

(2015)

**70

(2016)

**80

(2017)

**90

(2018)

**00

(2019)

**10

(2020)

**20

(2021)

Premium Ultrabook
15" Ultraportable (ultrabook) 9510 2-in-1
9510 9520
14" 9410 2-in-1 9420
9410 9420 2-in-1
Ultrabook
16" Ultraportable (ultrabook) Z600
15,6" 7520
14" 6430u E7440 E7450 E7470 7480 7490 7400 7410 7420
7400 2-in-1 7410 2-in-1 7420 2-in-1
13.3" 7370 7380 7390 7300 7310
Convertible 7350 7389 2-in-1 7390 2-in-1 7320
12.5" 7275 7285 7200 2-in-1 7210 2-in-1
Ultraportable (ultrabook) E7240 E7250 E7270 7280 7290
High-End
15.6" High-End E6500 E6510 E6520 E6530 E6540
14" E6400 E6410 E6420 E6430 E6440
13.3" E4300 E4310 E6320 E6330
12.5" E4200 E6220 E6230
Midrange
15.6" Mainstream E5500 E5510 E5520 E5530 E5540 E5550 E5570 5580 5590 5500 5510 5520
5591 5501 5511
14" E5400 E5410 E5420 E5430 E5440 E5450 E5470 5480 5490 5400 5410 5420
5495
5491 5401 5411
13.3 5300 5310 5320
13.3" 2-in-1 XT3 5300 2-in-1 5310 2-in-1 5320 2-in-1
12.5" Mainstream E5250 E5270 5280 5290
2-in-1 5285
5289 5290 2-in-1
10.8" 5175/9
10.1" Tablet 10-ST2
Entry-level
15.6" Mainstream 3540 3550/3560 3570 3580 3590 3500 3510
14" 3440 3450/3460 3470 3480 3490 3400 3410
13.3" 3340 3350 3380 3390 3301
Entry (educational) 3300 3310
2-in-1 3379 3390 2-in-1
11.6" 3189
Netbook3150 3160 3180 3190
10.1" 2100 2110 2120
Tablet 10-ST2e

(List does not include rugged modifications).

RFID (Optional) location on a Latitude E6410

Dell used the "E-series" name up through the 2016 models, and new 2017 models drop the "E."[2][3] and Dell E-Port Replicator with it. As of February 2017. Latitude computers are available in three series: the 3000, 5000, and 7000. The 3000 series is designed to be entry-level aimed at the education market and small businesses, This series did not exist prior to Haswell (xx40) as the Vostro Series was consolidated into the Latitude lineup to form the 3000 series. The 5000 series is mid-range. It includes a high-performance subseries whose model designations end in 1. These devices are available with higher-TDP (45w) processors, discrete graphics and NVMeSSDs. The 6000 series sat above the 5000 series. The 7000 series consists of high-end Ultrabook computers, introduced in 2014 with the Latitude E7440 and E7240 and replaced the existing high end 6000 series. Mobile workstation versions of Latitude used 5000 series instead of 6000 series.

Aside from the 3000, 5000, and 7000 series, Dell also provides an Education and Rugged Series of Latitude computers. The Education series laptops are designed for use in educational institutions and are geared towards office and internet based applications. The Rugged series laptops are similar to the previous Latitude XFR computers. They are designed with extra durability in mind.

xx20 Models (2021)[edit]

Dell announced xx20 models at CES 2021.[4]

  • 9520
  • 9420
  • 7520
  • 7420
  • 7320
  • 5520
  • 5521
  • 5420
  • 5320

xx10 Models (2020)[edit]

  • 9510 2-in-1: 15.0" lightweight 2-in-1[5]
  • 9510: 15.0" Lightweight
  • 9410 2-in-1: 14.0" Lightweight 2-in-1
  • 7410 2-in-1: 14.0" Ultraportable 2-in-1
  • 7410: 14.0" Ultraportable
  • 7310 2-in-1: 13.3" Ultraportable 2-in-1
  • 7310: 13.3" Ultraportable
  • 7210 2-in-1: 12.3" Detachable 2-in-1
  • 5510: 15.6" Mainstream
  • 5511: 15.6" High Performance
  • 5410: 14.0" Mainstream
  • 5411: 14.0" High Performance
  • 5310 2-in-1: 13.3" Mainstream 2-in-1
  • 5310: 13.3" Mainstream
  • 3510: 15.6" Essential
  • 3410: 14.0" Essential
  • 3310 2-in-1: 13.3" Essential 2-in-1
  • 3310: 13.3" Education

Previous Models[edit]

xx00 Models (2019)[edit]

  • 7400 2-in-1: 14.0" Ultraportable 2-in-1[6]
  • 7400: 14.0" Ultraportable[7]
  • 7300: 13.3" Ultraportable
  • 7200 2-in-1: 12.3" Detachable 2-in-1[8]
  • 5501: 15.6" High-Performance[9]
  • 5500: 15.6" Mainstream
  • 5401: 14.0" High-Performance
  • 5400: 14.0" Mainstream
  • 5300 2-in-1: 13.3" Mainstream 2-in-1[10]
  • 5300: 13.3" Mainstream
  • 3500: 15.6" Essential[11]
  • 3400: 14.0" Essential (Celeron-4305U, 8th Gen Core i3-8145U/i5-8265U-8365U/i7-8565U)
  • 3301: 13.3" Essential
  • 3300: 13.3" Education [12]

xx90 Models (2018)[edit]

  • 7490: 14.0" Ultraportable (7th gen Core i3, 8th gen Core i5/i7)
  • 7390: 13.3" Ultraportable (7th gen Core i3/i5, 8th gen Core i5/i7)
  • 7390 2-in-1: 13.3" Ultraportable 2-in-1 (8th gen Core i3, 8th gen Core i5/i7)
  • 7290: 12.5" Ultraportable (7th gen Core i3/i5, 8th gen Core i5/i7)
  • 5591: 15.6" High-Performance (8th gen Core i5/i7)
  • 5590: 15.6" Mainstream (7th gen Core i3/i5, 8th gen Core i5/i7)
  • 5491: 14.0" High-Performance (8th gen Core i5/i7)
  • 5490: 14.0" Mainstream (7th gen Core i3/i5, 8th gen Core i5/i7)
  • 5495: 14.0" Mainstream (AMD Ryzen Pro Mobile: 3 2300U, 5 2500U, 7 2700U)
  • 5290: 12.5" Mainstream (8th gen Core i5/i7)
  • 5290 2-in-1: 12.5" Mainstream 2-in-1 (7th gen Core i3/i5, 8th gen Core i5/i7)
  • 3590: 15.6" Essential (7th gen Celeron/Core i3/i5, 8th gen Core i5/i7)
  • 3490: 14.0" Essential (6th gen Celeron-3865U,Core i3-6606U 7th gen Core i3-7130U/i5-7200U, 8th gen Core i5-8250U-8350U/i7-8550U)
  • 3390 2-in-1: 13.3" Essential 2-in-1 (7th gen Pentium/Core i3, 8th gen Core i5)

xx80 Models (2017)[edit]

  • 7480: 14.0" Ultraportable (7th gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • 7389: 13.3" 2-in-1 Ultraportable (7th gen core i3/i5/i7)
  • 7380: 13.3" Ultraportable (7th gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • 7285: 12.3" Convertible Ultraportable (7th gen Core m3/m5/m7)
  • 7280: 12.5" Ultraportable (7th gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • 5580: 15.6" Mainstream (7th gen Core i5/i7)
  • 5480: 14.0" Mainstream (7th gen Core i5/i7)
  • 5289: 12.5" Ultraportable 2-in-1, (7th gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • 5285: 12.3" Convertible Ultraportable, detachable keyboard (7th gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • 5280: 12.5" Mainstream (7th gen Core i5/i7)
  • 3580: 15.6" Essential (7th gen Celeron/Core i3/i5/i7)
  • 3480: 14.0" Essential (6th gen i3-6006U/i5-6200U 7th gen Celeron-3865U, Core i3-7100U/i5-7200U-7300U/i7-7500U)
  • 3380: 13.3" Essential (7th gen Celeron/Core i3/i5/i7)
  • 3189: 11.6" Education Convertible 2-in-1 (Pentium N4200 Intel 7265, Celeron N3350)
  • 3180: 11.6" Education (Celeron N3350)

Exx70 Models (2016)[edit]

  • E7470: 14.0" Ultraportable (6th gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E7270: 12.5" Ultraportable (6th gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • 7370: 13.3" Ultraportable (6th gen Core m3/m5/m7)
  • 7275: 12.3" Convertible Ultraportable (6th gen Core m3/m5/m7)
  • E5570: 15.6" Mainstream (6th gen Core i5/i7)
  • E5470: 14.0" Mainstream (6th gen Core i5/i7)
  • E5270: 12.5" Mainstream (6th gen Core i5/i7)
  • 5175/9: 10.8" Ultraportable 2-in-1 (6th gen Core m5/m7)
  • 3570: 15.6" Essential (6th gen Celeron/Core i3/i5/i7)
  • 3470: 14.0" Essential (6th gen Celeron/Core i3/i5/i7)
  • 3370: 13.3" Essential (6th gen Core i3)
  • 3379: 13.3" Essential 2-in-1 (7th gen Core i3/i5)

Exx50 Models (2015)[edit]

  • E7450: 14.0" Ultraportable (5th gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • Latitude 13 7350: 13.3" Convertible Ultraportable 2-in-1 Tablet (5th gen Core M)
  • E7250: 12.5" Ultraportable (5th gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E5550: 15.6" Mainstream (5th gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E5450: 14.0" Mainstream (5th gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E5250: 12.5" Mainstream (5th gen Celeron/Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E3550: 15.6" Essential (5th gen Celeron/Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E3450: 14.0" Essential (5th gen Celeron/Core i3/i5/i7)

Exx40 Models (2013/2014)[edit]

  • E7440: 14.0" Ultraportable (4th gen Core i3/i5/i7ULV)
  • E7240: 12.5" Ultraportable (4th gen Core i3/i5/i7 ULV)
  • E6540: 15.6" Mainstream (4th gen Core i3/i5/i7 Mobile)
  • E6440: 14.0" Mainstream (4th gen Core i3/i5/i7 Mobile)
  • E5540: 15.6" Mainstream (4th gen Core i3/i5/i7 ULV)
  • E5440: 14.0" Mainstream (4th gen Core i3/i5/i7 ULV)
  • E3540: 15.6" Essential (4th gen Core i3/i5/i7 ULV)
  • E3440: 14.0" Essential (4th gen Core i3/i5/i7 ULV)

Exx30 Models (2012/2013)[edit]

  • E6530: 15.6" Mainstream (3rd gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E6430: 14.0" Mainstream (3rd gen Core i3/i5/i7) (Ivy bridge processor)
  • E6330: 13.3" Mainstream (3rd gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E6230: 12.5" Mainstream (3rd gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E5530: 15.6" Essential (3rd gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E5430: 14.0" Essential (2nd gen core i3) or (3rd gen Core i3/i5/i7 year 2014)
  • 6430u: 14.0" Ultraportable (3rd gen Core i3/i5/i7) [no standard docking, only over WiGi docking station D5000 and integrated dell wifi card ]

Exx20 Models (2011/2012)[edit]

  • E6520: 15.6" Mainstream (2nd gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E6420: 14.0" Mainstream (2nd gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E6320: 13.3" Ultraportable (2nd gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E6220: 12.5" Ultraportable (2nd gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E5520: 15.6" Essential (2nd gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E5420: 14.0" Essential (2nd gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E5520m: 15.6" Value (Celeron/Core2Duo)
  • E5420m: 14.0" Value (Celeron/Core2Duo)
  • E6420 XFR: 14.0" Fully Rugged (2nd gen Core i5/i7)
  • E6420 ATG: 14.0" Semi-Rugged (2nd gen Core i5/i7)

Exx10 Models (2010/2011)[edit]

  • E6510: 15.6" Mainstream (1st gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E6410: 14.1" Mainstream (1st gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E6410 ATG: 14.1" Semi-Rugged (1st gen Core i5/i7)
  • E5510: 15.6" Essential (1st gen Core i3/i5/i7)
  • E5410: 14.1" Essential (1st gen Core i3/i5/i7)
    Latitude e6500 and e6400
    Dell Latitude e6500 (right) next to a Latitude e6400, running Windows 10
  • E4310: 13.3" Ultraportable (1st gen Core i3/i5/i7)

Exx00 Models (2008/2009)[edit]

  • E6500: 15.4" Mainstream (Core2Duo)
  • E6400: 14.1" Mainstream (Core2Duo)
  • E6400 ATG: 14.1" Semi-Rugged (Core2Duo)
  • E6400 XFR: 14.1" Fully Rugged (Core2Duo)
  • E5500: 15.4" Essential (Celeron/Core2Duo)
  • E5400: 14.1" Essential (Core2Duo)
  • E4300: 13.3" Ultraportable (Core2Duo)
  • E4200: 12.1" Ultraportable (Core2Duo)

Other Models[edit]

  • XT3: 13.1" Convertible Touch Tablet & Pen (Core i3/i5/i7) –Release Date: August 2011
  • XT2: 12.1" Convertible Touch Tablet & Pen (Core2Duo ULV)
  • XT2 XFR: 12.1" Convertible Touch Tablet & Pen –Fully Rugged (Core2Duo ULV)
  • 2100 10.1" Netbook
  • 2110 10.1" Netbook
  • 2120 10.1" Netbook
  • Z 16.0" Thin and Light

Latitude D-series[edit]

The Latitude D-series was introduced in 2003, and discontinued in 2007. The models are the D4x0 (12.1" Ultra Mobile), D5x0 (14.1 or 15.0" standard aspect screen except for D531, plastic case, value model), D6x0 (14.1" Corporate model) and D8x0 (15.4" high-resolution model) most models are based on the Intel Core 2 Duo and the Intel Santa Rosa chipset, with the exception being the D531. Ever since the D420, D620, and D800, the D-series features wide-aspect LCD screens: 12.1", 14.1", and 15.4" respectively.

Latitude D6x0 series[edit]

The Latitude D6x0 series is the 14"/14.1" corporate model. It aims to combine heavy-duty power with reasonable portability, and differs primarily from D8x0 series in screen size. All are two spindle designs, with a "D/bay" modular bay which can interchange optical drives, a second hard drive, a floppy disk, a Zip drive, or a second battery. All models have a smart card socket, PCMCIA socket, 9-pin serial port, a "D-dock" port for a docking station or port replicator, and have an internal socket for an 802.11 wireless card.

The D600 and D610 share a common form factor, battery socket, and have a parallel printer port.

The D620 and D630 share a common form factor, battery socket, and do not have a parallel printer port. Both have support for an optional internal Bluetooth module, a socket for an optional mobile broadband card, and have an external switch for disabling any wireless connections.

Latitude D600[edit]

The D600 (and simultaneously introduced D800) was released on 3/12/2003. These were Dell's first laptops in the Latitude D-series, and also Dell's first business-oriented notebooks based on the Pentium-M (first-generation "Banias" or Dothan) chips and running on a 400 MT/s FSB on DDR memory. It had a PATA hard drive and a D-series modular bay, and used an ATI Radeon 9000 GPU. It had a 14" screen, in regular (non-widescreen) form factor. Unlike later D6x0 series machines, both memory sockets were accessible from a single cover on the bottom of the system.

Most, if not all Latitude models prior to the Latitude Dx20 series had a near-clone Inspiron, in the case of the D600, it was the Inspiron 600M. Differences include that the 600M does not work with the Dell D-Dock, and the case styling is slightly different. The motherboards, screens, and hard drive caddies are all physically interchangeable.

The Latitude D600 used a PA-10/PA-12 charger and came with a DVD drive, 2 x USB, 1 x TV, 1 x network, 1 x parallel, 1 x serial, and 1 monitor output. The hard drive is accessible through a cover on the left-hand front side of the lower case and is secured by 1 screw. After removing the screw, the hard drive can then slide out.

Latitude D610[edit]

The D610 (released in 2005) was an update of the D600 design; it used a slightly modified D600 chassis and a newer Pentium M chipset ("Sonoma" with 533 MT/s FSB). This chipset was the first Intel mobile chipset to use DDR2 Memory, versus the DDR in the Latitude Dx00 series. For space-saving purposes, instead of having both RAM chips on the bottom of the laptop, one RAM slot was moved to the top of the motherboard which could be accessed by removing the keyboard, whereas the other RAM slot remained in the area it had been located at previously. Unlike the D600 and prior midrange Latitudes (The 6xx series, dating back to the C-series) you had a choice of standard integrated Intel Graphics (GMA 900), or a discrete ATI solution (Radeon X300).

Latitude D610 Audio-Out "whining"[edit]

Some Dell Latitude D610 units with a dedicated ATI X300 graphics card seem to have problems with the audio-out jack. Symptoms of this problem include a noise or whine when an audio device is connected to the audio-out jack. Up to this date Dell does not have a clear solution to this problem.[13][14][15][16]

Latitude D620[edit]

In March 2006, Dell introduced the D620 (and the D820), its first business-oriented notebook with a dual-core processor available. The D620 marked the transition from strictly 32-bit processing to opening-up the potential to run 64-bit operating systems and applications. Initially available with the interim "Yonah" Core Duo (x86 32-bit) processors, it was later sold with the first-generation mobile "Merom" Core 2 (x86-64 64-bit) processor once those became available from Intel in the Fall of 2006; both run on a 667MT/s bus. So depending on the installed processor, a D620 can run x86-64 64-bit software. The D620 used a Socket-M for its motherboard and its CPU is possible to be upgraded. It was initially sold with Intel integrated graphics, but an option to upgrade to a discrete Nvidia GPU became available after a few months. It replaced the raised pointing stick with a "low profile" model and introduced the option of 4-cell and 9-cell batteries in addition to the standard 6-cell model. It uses DDR2 memory and is compatible with both PC2-4200 (533 MHz) and PC2-5300 (667 MHz) memory.

Although the D620 accepts a maximum of 4 GB of physical memory, it cannot be used fully, because of the 32-bit physical addressing limitation of the 945 Core 2 mobile chipsets [Intel-945GM/PM-chipset], (not related to the BIOS or the use of a 32-bit or 64-bit OS), restricts the usable memory by the operating system to 3.5 GB, or 3.3 GB with onboard video (memory is shared).

The D620 has one mono speaker located in the base below the touchpad. It has no option to expand to stereo without using external speakers or headphones.

There was no near-clone Inspiron model for the D620.

Latitude D630[edit]

Released in 2007, the D630 is an update of the D620 design. It differed most significantly in being based on the newer "Santa Rosa" (GM/PM965) mobile chipset which supported the 800MT/s models of the mobile Core 2 Duo (both the Merom 7xx0 series and later the Penryn-based 8x00/9x00 series). It also had newer versions of the graphics processor options, support for Intel's "Turbo Memory" flash cache (although this uses the same card slot as the mobile broadband card), and support for internal Wireless-N. It also added a 4-pin Firewire IEEE1394 port. It uses DDR2 memory and is compatible with PC2-5300 (667 MHz) and PC2-6400 (800 MHz) memory. The D630 unofficially will accept a maximum of 8 GB of physical memory, however, a BIOS update is required.

Unlike the D830, the D630 only has one speaker.

Latitude D620/D630 problems[edit]
  • All early D620 models were known for faulty LCD screens. The early models suffered from light bleeding, where a black screen would show light bleeding in from the bottom of the screen. This wasn't fixed until almost a year into production.
  • In addition, some D630 screens are known for having bad LCD pixels.
  • They also have overheating issues: the D620/D630 and D820/D830 were available with an Intel integrated GMA or Nvidia graphics chip. The optional Nvidia graphics on this series of laptops are to be avoided due to overheating issues where the GPU would develop cracks in the solder. This was mostly due to temperature fluctuation but the graphics chips also ran much hotter than they were meant to. The failure manifests itself by stripes or "artifacts" on the LCD and also an external screen or by the total absence of an image. Even the D830 series, despite having more room for cooling the chip, suffered from the same issue. Most Nvidia models will eventually suffer from failure of the graphics chip due to the switch to lead-free solder and "underfill" of the BGA. The computer industry at the time had just switched to lead-free solders without redesigning cooling systems. This in turn led to undesirable heating cycles of the more brittle solder causing micro fractures to quickly form. Dell tried to prolong the lifetime of the Nvidia chips in these models with a BIOS update which causes the fan to run more often and thus reduce the strain from repeated heating/cooling cycles on the graphics chip. NVIDIA was found liable for these failures, causing a multi-million-unit recall, not only of some Dell notebooks, but also some HP, Compaq, and Apple products.[17]
Latitude D630c[edit]

The D630c was a slight variant model of the D630, featuring a "manageable" version of the motherboard chipset unavailable on the standard D630.

Unlike the D630, the D630c model laptop could not be ordered with Intel graphics; it shipped only with the Nvidia graphics chip. As a result, all of the Latitude D630c laptops eventually fail.

It also could only be ordered with the Intel 4965AGN wireless card; it couldn't be configured with Dell's wireless options or lower end Intel wireless cards.

Latitude D631[edit]

The Latitude D631 (released in 2007), similar to the D531, was a variant of the Latitude Dx30 series that had AMD processors instead of Intel. However, the D631 is very rare inside the United States due to it not being an option to order on Dell's website. You can find some that originated in the United States, but those were special ordered over the phone. They were sold alongside the D630 as standard equipment in select international countries, but while not being that rare internationally, they didn't sell as many units as the D630 series (and even the D630c series) laptops did. As a result, not much information about specific chipsets, graphics chip options (If there were any), or any other features can be found online for specifying details.

Latitude D8x0 series[edit]

The Latitude D8x0 series is the 15.4" corporate model; unlike the D600 and D610, all feature a widescreen form factor. All are two spindle designs, with a "D-bay" modular bay which can interchange optical drives, a floppy module, a second hard drive, or a second battery. All models have a smart card socket, PCMCIA socket, and 9-pin serial port, a "D-dock" port for docking station or port replicator, and have an internal socket for an 802.11 wireless card.

The D800 was Dell's first widescreen Latitude notebook.

The D8x0 series models roughly parallel the technology in the D6x0 models other than for screen size; they do not share a battery form factor with the D6x0 series. The D820 and D830 add an ExpressCard socket, not available in the D6x0 series. The D830 is capable of accepting 8 GB of physical memory with updated firmware.

The D800 equated to the Precision M60, and the D810 to the Precision M70. They were for all intents and purposes identical except for the graphics card, certification, and in the case of the M70, the lid.

The near-clone Inspirons for the D800 and D810 were the Inspiron 8500 and 8600; the D820 and D830 share hardware with Precision models M65 and M4300 respectively. There are even known cases of "mixed-mode" samples of the latter, where the Dell-recorded type according to the service tag and markings differs from the BIOS-reported type with an identical service tag.

Both Latitude D820 and D830 have stereo speakers mounted on both sides of the keyboard.

Latitude D5x0 series[edit]

The Latitude D500 series is a set of "entry-level" business models; they are built on a 15" non-widescreen form factor, although models before the D530 were sold with both 14.1" and 15" screens (the 14.1" having a wider bezel.) They are 2-spindle devices (removable optical drive interchangeable with D6xx/D8xx machines), and roughly follow the technical generations (chipset and processor-wise) of the D6x0 and D8x0 series. The D530 was Dell's last non-widescreen Latitude model.

The Latitude D531 was also available, being the cheapest Latitude available at the time due to using AMD processors and cutting back on a few features. It was essentially a D830 with, no TrackPoint, no smartcard reader, an option for a 14" screen (If this was chosen it would have a similar wider bezel as on the earlier D5xx series machines), and a AMD-based motherboard. It does keep some premium features from the D830, such as a magnesium chassis, support for a 2nd battery, and a SATA based interface for the hard drive, allowing people to upgrade to a much faster SSD for cheap. DVD Drives, Screen Assemblies (If the laptop was ordered with the 15" screen), RAM, and Hard Drives/Caddies were interchangeable.

Latitude D4x0 series[edit]

The D400 and D410 were 12" non-widescreen (4:3 aspect ratio) ultra-portable notebooks, roughly following the technology of the comparable generations of the series. The D400 had a design that was similar to the D610 and came with a ULV Pentium M (Banias). The D410 came with a ULV Pentium M (Dothan).

The D420 and D430 are 12.1" widescreen ultra-portable notebooks. The D420 came with either an Intel Core Solo U1300 ULV 1.06 GHz, Intel Core Duo U2400 ULV 1.06 GHz or Intel Core Duo U2500 ULV 1.2 GHz. Unlike its bigger D620 brother, the D420's CPU was a soldered-in BGA and therefore is not up-gradable. The D430 came with either an Intel Core Solo U1400 ULV 1.2 GHz or Intel Core 2 Duo U7600 1.2 GHz; the U7700 Processor (1.33 GHz) was later made available as an option.

While the D8x0, D6x0, and D5x0 models were all introduced simultaneously with each generation, the D4x0 series were generally introduced a couple of months after their counterparts. Also, since they use ULV (ultra-low-voltage) processors and chipsets, and are generally less powerful, the technology does not correspond as closely as it does between other models in each generation — for example, the D420 uses the parallel ATA hard drive (1.8") rather than the SATA (2.5") interface in the D520/620/820.

In a 22C° ambient the D430 U7700 processor has been measured to run from 62C° at idle to 85C° under heavy system loads, that is, within 10C° of Intel's max. temperature rating for the processor.[citation needed] The D4x0 series has been replaced by the E4200 model.

D/Bay modules[edit]

Dell Latitude D-series Zip drive.
The Zip 250 module for the D/Bay

The Dell Latitude D-series laptops support swapping out the optical drive with select modules available from Dell. Available were a CD-ROM, DVD-ROM/CD-RW and a DVD+-RW optical disk drives, along with a 2nd hard drive, 2nd battery, floppy drive and Iomega Zip 250 drive. An external enclosure branded as the D/Bay was available, allowing users to use modules on Latitudes that didn't have internal bays, such as the Latitude D4xx series of ultraportable laptops. The enclosure uses a special type of USB port only available on certain Latitudes(D4x0 series)

The Iomega Zip 250 module was released as the successor to the similar module for the Latitude C-series. When the modules came out in 2003, at the start of the D-series lifespan, Iomega was discontinuing the Zip format. As such, this module is very rare, and was only on sale for a few months after it came out. Newer Latitude laptops detect it as a CD-ROM drive within the BIOS, but within an operating system, the zip disks are detected as standard removable drives.

NVidia GPU problems[edit]

Many D620/D630 and D820/D830 models (and related Precision models) with NVidia mobile GPUs may experience graphics failure. A Class Action Lawsuit settlement by NVidia was reached where certain Dell models were provided with replacement motherboards at no expense.

Recall affecting D Series batteries[edit]

Dell posted notices to many of their laptop customers on August 14, 2006, saying that the Sony batteries on the D410, D500, D505, D510, D520, D600/D610, D620, and D800/D810 models were prone to bursting into flames, or even exploding.[18][19]

The batteries on any of these computers purchased between April 2004 and July 18, 2006 were supposed to be removed and the computers run on AC power until replacements arrived. Problematic Sony batteries led to battery recall programs at other laptop companies, including Hitachi,[20] Toshiba,[21] Lenovo (IBM)[22] and Apple.[23]

Latitude C series[edit]

The Latitude C-series notebooks covered the range of processors from the Pentium 166 MHz to the Pentium 4-M. Models in this series included the CP (Pentium processors), CPi (Pentium II processors), CPx, C600 and C800 (Mobile Pentium III processors), CPt, C500 and C510 (Celeron processors), C400, C610 and C810 (Pentium 3-M processors) and C640 and C840 (Mobile Pentium 4-M).[24]

C series laptops were notable for their consistent and interchangeable accessories across this wide range of processors. The series was one of the first to offer the UXGA 1600x1200 resolution display and included a NVidia GeForce MX400 32 MB video accelerator to complement the display requirements. A robust design made it a favorite in harsher climates; however, this design lacked the visual appeal of many of its competitors.[25]

The most popular of the C-series included the C800, C810, C840, and later the C640.[citation needed]

The later C-series models mostly had near clones sold as the Inspiron 4000 and 8000 series:

  • C840 cloned as the Inspiron 8200 and Precision M50
  • C810 cloned as the Inspiron 8100 and Precision M40
  • C800 cloned as the Inspiron 8000
  • C640 cloned as the Inspiron 4150 and as the Inspiron 2650
  • C610 cloned as the Inspiron 4100
  • C600 cloned as the Inspiron 4000
  • CPxJ cloned as the Inspiron 3800
  • CPxH cloned as the Inspiron 3700

An interesting note on the C840 is that it was the last Dell notebook (along with its sister models the Inspiron 8200 and Precision M50) to have both a "fixed" optical drive as well as a modular bay, making it a "three-spindle" notebook. The modular bay could also be used for a second battery identical to the primary battery rather than a special modular bay battery. It used a Pentium 4-M processor and DDR SDRAM.[25] The Dell C840 can support up to one gigabyte of RAM in each of two slots, for a total of two gigabytes in all. The GPU can also be upgraded on the C840/M50/i8200, from a GeForce2 Go to the Quadro4 Go 700 from the Precision M50.

Rugged models[edit]

The Latitude ATG was a semi-rugged version of the D620, and was Dell's only semi-rugged offering, while their fully rugged offering originally consisted of the Augmentix XTG630, a D630 in a fully rugged case, and later the D630 XFR. The ATG as well as the XFR have a protective glass glued on top of the screen that often has glue leaking onto the display causing air bubbles to form.

Latitude XT series[edit]

The Latitude XT was a touch-screen convertible-tablet computer series.

Latitude XT[edit]

In July 2008, Dell released multi-touch touch-screen drivers for the Latitude XT Tablet, claiming the "industry's first convertible tablet with multi-touch capabilities."[11] Dell has partnered with N-trig, providers of DuoSense technology, combining pen, capacitive touch and multi-touch in a single device. N-trig's DuoSense dual-mode digitizer uses both pen and zero-pressure capacitive touch to provide a true hands-on computing experience for mobile computers and other digital input products over a single device.

Latitude XT problems[edit]

A large number of user reports suggest that the Dell Latitude XT suffers from a major problem.[26] The N-Trig digitizer interfaces to the XT by an internal USB port.[27] Users report that any other USB device which is plugged in may, and usually does, prevent the N-Trig applet (program which controls the features) from identifying the N-Trig hardware. In addition, there have been reports that certain other drivers, such as iTunes Helper, may cause this or a similar problem. Other users report no problems from iTunes. According to the reports, this still leaves the dual sense but without Multi-Touch and other advanced features, "which render the auto and dual mode useless. The digitizer will only start working again after consecutive reboots."[28] There have also been reports that the driver may crash, catastrophically or non-catastrophically, leaving no screen input at all. A re-boot may solve the problem, but often users found that the driver installation is damaged, requiring a re-installation of the drivers. But the install program will not un-install if it doesn't recognize the N-Trig hardware. In this case, the alternatives are (1) restore the entire operating system from backup, (2) manually un-install by erasing all N-Trig programs and drivers then editing the registry to remove all references to N-Trig, then re-install the N-Trig software, or (3) do a complete re-install of Windows.

These problems have been reported both with XP and Vista, 32 and 64 bit. In addition, Dell sells a MediaBase with an internal DVD drive. The drive also interfaces by way of a USB connection inside the MediaBase. Most, but not all, users of the MediaBase report that it prevents the drivers from loading.

Latitude XT2[edit]

[icon]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (November 2020)

Latitude XT3[edit]

2012's 13.3"model.[29]

[icon]

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (November 2020)

Technical specifications[edit]

The majority of Latitude laptops are built to order.

Operating System: Windows, FreeDOS, or Ubuntu for some models.

Processor package

  Socket

  Soldered

Audio codec

  Azalia\HD Audio

  AC'97

  Software AC'97

3xxx, 5xxx, 7xxx Series (2017-current)[edit]

Model Release CPUChipsetMemoryGraphics Audio codecNetwork cardScreen Dimensions (mm) Weight
Type Maximum Type Resolution " Height Width Depth
Premium Ultrabook
9510 2020 Intel Core 8th Gen Comet Lake CML-U 15w

Up to 10810u

LPDDR3-2133 8 or 16 GB (Onboard) Intel UHD 620 Intel AX201 IPS, opt touch, 100% sRGB 400 cd/m2 1920x1080 15.6 8.23 340.2 215.8 1.4 kg
9410 2020 Intel Core 8th Gen Comet Lake CML-U 15w

Up to 10810u

LPDDR3-2133 8 or 16 GB (Onboard) Intel UHD 620 Intel AX201 IPS, opt touch, 100% sRGB 300 cd/m2 1920x1080 14.0 8.53 319.7 199.9 1.36 kg
Ultrabook
14"
7410 2020 Intel Core 8th Gen Comet Lake

Up to 10810u

DDR4-2066 32 GB (2 slots) Intel UHD 620
7400[30]2019 Intel Core 8th Gen Whiskey Lake

Up to 8665u

DDR4-2400 32 GB (2 slots) Intel UHD 620 Realtek ALC3254 Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 9560 + Bluetooth 5.0 or AX200 IPS, opt. touch 1366×768
1920×1080
14.0
7490 2018 Intel Core 8th Gen Kaby Lake R

Up to 8650u

DDR4-2400
(or 2133)
32 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 620

(or UHD 620)

Realtek ALC3246-CG IPS, opt. touch 1366×768
1920×1080
14.0 1.4 kg
7480 2017 Intel Core 7th Gen Kaby Lake

Up to 7600u

DDR4-2133 32 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 620 Qualcomm QCA61x4A,

or Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265 + Bluetooth 4.2

1366×768
1920×1080
14.0
13"
7300 2019 Intel Core 8th Gen Whiskey Lake DDR4 32 GB (2 slots) Intel UHD 620 Realtek ALC3254 Qualcomm QCA61x4A,

or Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 9560 + Bluetooth 5.0 or AX200

IPS 1920x1080 13.3
7390 2018 Intel Core 8th Gen Kaby Lake R DDR4-2400
(or 2133)
16 GB (1 slot) Intel HD 620

(or UHD 620)

Realtek ALC3246-CG Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265 + Bluetooth 4.2 IPS, opt. touch 1920×1080 13.3 17 304.8 208 1.2 kg
7380 2017 Intel Core 7th Gen Kaby Lake DDR4-2133 Intel HD 620 13.3
12"
7290[31]2018 Intel Core 8th Gen Kaby Lake R DDR4-2400
(or 2133)
16 GB (1 slot) Intel UHD620
(or HD620)
17 305 208 1.2 kg
7280 2017 Intel Core 7th Gen Kaby Lake DDR4 Intel HD 620 Qualcomm QCA61x4A,

or Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265 + Bluetooth 4.2

Midrange
15"
5501[32]2019 Intel Core 9th Gen Coffee Lake
i7-9850H
Intel CM246 DDR4-2066 32 GB (2 slots) Intel UHD 630
Option + NVIDIA GeForce MX150
Realtek ALC3204 Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 9560 + Bluetooth 5.0 or AX200 IPS, opt. touch 1366×768
1920×1080
15.6
5500 Intel Core 8th Gen Whiskey Lake DDR4-2066 32 GB (2 slots) Intel UHD 620
Option + AMD Radeon 540x
Realtek ALC3204 Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 9560 + Bluetooth 5.0 or AX200 IPS, opt. touch 1366×768
1920×1080
15.6
5591[33]2018 Intel Core 8th Gen Coffee Lake
i7-8850H
Intel CM246 DDR4-2066 32 GB (2 slots) Intel UHD 630
Option + NVIDIA GeForce MX130
Realtek ALC3246-CG Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265 + Bluetooth 4.2 IPS, opt. touch 1366×768
1920×1080
15.6
5590[34]Intel Core 8th Gen Kaby Lake R

Up to 8650u or

Intel Core 7th Gen Kaby Lake

Up to 7300u

DDR4-2400
(or 2133)
32 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 620 or UHD 620
Option + NVIDIA GeForce MX130
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265 + Bluetooth 4.2 IPS, opt. touch 1366×768
1920×1080
15.6
5580 2017 7th gen Core i3/i5/i7 DDR4-2400
(or 2133)
32 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 620 or UHD 620
Option + NVIDIA GeForce 940M or 930MX
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265 + Bluetooth 4.2 IPS, opt. touch 1366×768
1920×1080
15.6
14"
5401 2019 Intel Core 9th Gen Coffee Lake
i7-9850H
Intel CM246 DDR4 32 GB (2 slots) Intel UHD 630
Option + NVIDIA GeForce MX150
Realtek ALC3204 Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 9560 + Bluetooth 5.0 or AX200 Anti-glare LED 14.0
5400 Intel Core 8th Gen Whiskey Lake DDR4 32 GB (2 slots) Intel UHD 620
Option + AMD Radeon 540x
Realtek ALC3204 Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 9560 + Bluetooth 5.0 or AX200 Anti-glare LED 14.0
5495 2018 AMD Ryzen Raven Ridge

Up to 2700u

DDR4 32 GB (2 slots) Radeon Vega 8 Qualcomm QCA61x4A Anti-glare LED 1366×768
1920×1080
14.0
5491[35]Intel Core

i5-8300H (4× 2.3GHz, 8MB)
i5-8400H (4× 2.5GHz, 8MB)
i7-8850H (6× 2.6GHz, 9MB)

Intel CM246 DDR4 32 GB (2 slots) Intel UHD 630
Option + NVIDIA GeForce MX130
Realtek ALC3246-CG Anti-glare LED 14.0
5490 Intel Core

i3-7130U (2× 2.7GHz, 3MB)
i5-7300U (2× 2.6GHz, 3MB)
i5-8250U (4× 1.6GHz, 6MB)
i5-8350U (4× 1.7GHz, 6MB)
i7-8650U (4× 1.9GHz, 8MB)

DDR4 32 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 620 or UHD 620
Option + NVIDIA GeForce MX130
Realtek ALC3246-CG Anti-glare LED 14.0
5480 2017 7th gen Core i3/i5/i7 DDR4 32 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 620 or UHD 620
Option + NVIDIA GeForce 940M or 930MX
Anti-glare LED 14.0
13"
5300 2019 DDR4 Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 9560 + Bluetooth 5.0 or AX200
12"
5290 2018 Intel Core i3, i5 and i7 DDR4 (2 slots) Intel HD 620

(or UHD 620)

Anti-glare LED 12.5
5280 2017 Intel Core i3, i5 and i7 DDR4 (2 slots) Intel HD 620 Anti-glare LED 12.5
Entry-Level
15"
3500 2019 Intel Core 8th Gen Whiskey Lake DDR4 Intel UHD 620 Anti-glare LED 15.6
3590 2018 Intel Core 8th Gen Kaby Lake R DDR4 Intel UHD 620 Anti-glare LED 15.6
3580 2017 Intel Core 7th Gen Kaby Lake DDR4 Intel HD 620 Anti-glare LED 15.6
14"
3400 Intel Core 8th Gen Whiskey Lake DDR4 Intel UHD 620 Anti-glare LED
3490 Intel Core 8th Gen Kaby Lake R DDR4 Intel UHD 620 Anti-glare LED
3480 Intel Core 7th Gen Kaby Lake DDR4 Intel HD 620 Anti-glare LED
13"
3301 DDR4 Intel UHD 620
3300 DDR4 Intel UHD 620
3390

2-in-1

DDR4 Intel UHD 620
3380 i3-6006U

i5-7200U

DDR4 Intel HD 520

Intel HD 620

11.6"
3190 DDR4 11.6"
3189 DDR4 11.6"
3180 DDR3L 11.6"
Gray colored cards - switchable graphics (AMD Dynamic Switchable Graphics or Nvidia Optimus)
Red colored cards - non-switchable discrete graphics
(may be changed for purchase time only)

E-Family (2007-2017)[edit]

Model Release CPUChipsetMemoryGraphics Audio codecNetwork cardScreen Dimensions (mm) Weight
Type Maximum Type Resolution " Height Width Depth
Ultrabook
14"
E7470 2016 6th Gen Intel Core
up to i7-6650U (2×2.2 GHz 4MB)
DDR4-2133 32 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 520 or HD 540 Intel Skylake-U/Y PCH - Realtek Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8260 + Bluetooth 4.2 Anti-glare LED
(opt. + 2 finger multi-touch)
1366×768
1600×900
1920×1080
2560×1440
14.0 19.4 334.9 232 1.36 kg
E7450 2015 5th Gen Intel Core DDR3L-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 5500 Intel Wireless-AC 7265 (802.11ac 2x2)

Dell Wireless: 1707 (802.11n 1x1)

Anti-glare LED 1600×900

1920x1080

14.0 337.8 231.1 20.3 1.6 kg
E6430u 2013 Intel Core 3rd Gen Ivy Bridge

up to i7-3667U (2x4 3.2GHz 4MB)

DDR3L-1600 8GB (2 slots) Intel HD 4000 Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6205[a] or Ultimate-N 6300;
or Dell Wireless: 1504 (802.11g/n 1x1) or 1540 (802.11n 2x2)
Anti-glare LED 1366x768

1600×900

14.0 338.2 229.7 20.9 1.69 kg (3-cell)
13"
7370 2016 Intel Core 6th Gen Skylake DDR4-2133 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 620 13.3
12"
E7270 2016 Intel Core 6th Gen Skylake DDR4-2133 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 520 Intel Wireless-AC 8260 (802.11ac 2x2)

Dell Wireless: 1820 (802.11ac 2x2)

1366x768
1920x1080
12.5
E7250 2015 Intel Core 5th Gen Broadwell DDR3L-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 5500 Intel Wireless-AC 7265 (802.11ac 2x2)

Dell Wireless: 1707 (802.11n 1x1)

1366x768
1920×1080
12.5
E7240 2013 Intel Core 4th Gen Haswell DDR3L-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD Graphics 4400 Intel Lynx Point HD Intel Wireless-N 7260 (802.11ac 2x2)

Dell Wireless: 1601 (802.11.n 1x1) or 1506 (802.11n 1x1)

1366x768
1920×1080
12.5
High-End
15"
E6540 2013 Intel Core 4th Gen Haswell

Up to 4810MQ

Intel QM87 DDR3L-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 4600
Option + AMD Radeon 8790M (2GB GDDR5)
Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6235 + Bluetooth 4.0 or Ultimate-N 6300
or Dell Wireless 1506 (802.11g/n 1x1)
Anti-glare LED 1366×768
1920×1080
15.6 33.4 379 250.5 5.64 lbs
E6530 2012 Intel Core i3, i5 and i7 up to i7-37x0QM Intel QM77[b]DDR3–1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 3000 (i3-2xxx)
or HD 4000 (i3/i5/i7 3xxxM)
Option + NVIDIA NVS 5200M (1 GB GDDR5)
IDT 92HDxxx Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6205[a] or Ultimate-N 6300;
or Dell Wireless: 1504 (802.11g/n 1x1) or 1540 (802.11n 2x2)
Anti-glare LED 1366×768
1600×900
1920×1080
15.6 28.3-34.2 384 258 5.4 lbs
(4-cell, SSD)
E6520 2011 Up to Intel Core i7-2860QM
(4× 2.5 GHz, 8MB L3)
Intel QM67 DDR3–1600 16 GB[c] (2 slots) Intel HD 3000
Option + NVIDIA NVS 4200M (512 MB)
IDT 92HDxxx Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6205 (802.11n 2x2) or Ultimate-N 6300 (802.11n 3x3)
Dell Wireless: 1501 (802.11b/g/n 1x1); or 1530 (802.11a/g/n 2x2)
Anti-glare LED
(opt. + 2 finger multi-touch)
1366×768
1600×900
1920×1080
15.6 28.3-34.2 384 258 5.52 lbs
(4-cell)
E6510 2010 Intel Core Clarksfield

Up to 820QM

Intel QM57 DDR3–1333 8/16 GB[d] (2 slots) Intel HD
Option + NVIDIA NVS 3100M (512 MB DDR3)
IDT 92HDxxx Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6200 or 6250 (802.11n 2x2) or Ultimate-N 6300 (802.11n 3x3)
Dell Wireless: 1501 (802.11b/g/n 1x1); or 1520 (802.11a/g/n 2x2)
LED backlit TN 1366×768
1600×900
1920×1080
15.6 27.4-33.3 358 257 5.53 lbs
(6-cell)
E6500 2009 Intel Core 2 Duo, up to T9800
(2× 2.93 GHz 6MB L2)
Intel GM45 DDR2-800 8 GB (2 slots) Intel GMA 4500MHD IDT 92HDxxx Dell Wireless: 1397 or 1510;
Intel WiFi Link 5100 or 5300
CCFL backlit or LED backlit 1280x800

1440x900

1920x1200

15.4 27.4-33.3 358 257 5.15 lbs
(4-cell)
Intel PM45 or NVIDIA Quadro NVS 160M (256 MB DDR2)
14"
E6440 2013 Intel Core 4th Gen Haswell

Up to 4610M

Intel QM87

[b][e]

DDR3L 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 4600
Option + AMD Radeon 8690M (2 GB GDDR5)
Intel Lynx Point HD Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6235 + Bluetooth 4.0 or Ultimate-N 6300
or Dell Wireless 1506 (802.11g/n 1x1)
Anti-glare LED 1366×768
1600×900

1920x1080 (later eDP models)

14.0 31.8 338 232.6 4.68 lbs
E6430 2012 Intel Core i3, i5 and i7 up to i7-37x0QM Intel QM77[b]DDR3–1333 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 3000 (Core i3-2xxx)
or HD 4000 (Core i3/i5/i7 3xxxM)
Option + NVIDIA NVS 5200M
IDT 92HD93 Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6205 or 6250 or Ultimate-N 6300; or
Dell Wireless: 1504 (802.11b/g/n 1x1), or 1540 (802.11a/g/n 2x2)
Anti-glare LED 1366×768, 1600×900 14.0
E6420 2011 Up to Intel Core i7-2860QM
(4× 2.5 GHz, 8MB L3)
Intel QM67 DDR3–1333 16 GB[c] (2 slots) Intel HD 3000
Option + NVIDIA NVS 4200M (512 MB)
IDT 92HDxxx Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6205 (802.11n 2x2) or Ultimate-N 6300 (802.11n 3x3)
Dell Wireless: 1501 (802.11b/g/n 1x1); or 1530 (802.11a/g/n 2x2)
Anti-glare LED
(opt. + 2 finger multi-touch)
1366×768, 1600×900 14.0 27-32.4 352 241 4.56 lbs
(4-cell)
E6410 2010 Up to Intel Core i7-840QM
(4× 3.2 GHz, 8MB L3)
max. factory-installed is i7-640M
(2× 2.8 GHz, 4MB L3)
Intel QM57 DDR3–1333 8/16[d] GB (2 slots) Intel HD
Option + NVIDIA NVS 3100M (512 MB DDR3)
IDT 92HDxxx Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6200 or 6250 (802.11n 2x2) or Ultimate-N 6300 (802.11n 3x3)
Dell Wireless: 1501 (802.11b/g/n 1x1); or 1520 (802.11a/g/n 2x2)
LED backlit 1280×800
1440×900
14.1 27.4-33.3 358 257 4.2 lbs
(6-cell)
E6400 2008 Intel Core 2 Duo, up to T9800
(2× 2.93 GHz 6MB L2)
Intel GM45 DDR2-800 8 GB (2 slots) Intel GMA 4500MHD IDT 92HDxxx Dell Wireless: 1397 or 1510;
Intel WiFi Link 5100 or 5300
LED backlit 1280×800
1440×900
14.1 25.4-31 335 238.3 4.3 lbs
(4-cell)
Intel PM45 or NVIDIA Quadro NVS 160M (512 MB DDR2)
13"
E6330 2012 Intel Core i3, i5 or i7 up to i7-35x0M Intel QM77 DDR3-1600 16 GB[c] (2 slots) Intel HD 3000 or HD 4000 Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6205 or 6250 or Ultimate-N 6300; or
Dell Wireless: 1504 (802.11b/g/n 1x1), or 1540 (802.11a/g/n 2x2)
LED backlit 1366×768 13.3
E6320 2011 Intel Core 2nd Gen Sandy Bridge

Up to i7-26x0M

Intel QM67 DDR3–1333 16 GB[c] (2 slots) Intel HD 3000 Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6205[a] or Ultimate-N 6300; or
Dell Wireless: 1501 (802.11b/g/n 1x1), or 1530 (802.11a/g/n 2x2)
Anti-glare LED 1366×768 13.3 25.4-30.1 335 223.3 3.64 lbs
(3-cell)
E4310 2010 Intel Core Arrandale

Up to i5-540m

Intel QS57 DDR3–1333 8 GB (2 slots) Intel HD Dell Wireless: 1501 (802.11n)

Intel® WiFi Link 6200 (802.11n 2x2) 6300 (802.11n 3x3) 6250 (802.11n 2x2)

LED backlit 1366x768 13.3
E4300 2008 Intel Core 2 Duo up to SP9600 Intel GS45 DDR3-1066 8 GB (2 slots) Intel GMA 4500MHD Dell Wireless: 1397 (802.11g), or 1510 (802.11a/g/n 2x2),
Intel WiFi Link: 5100 (802.11a/g/n 1x2),
or 5300 (802.11a/g/n 3x3)
LED backlit 1280×800 13.3 25.4-29 310 217.4 1.5 kg
(3-cell)
12"
E6230[37]Intel Core i3, i5 and i7 Intel QM77 DDR3-1600 16 GB[c] (2 slots) Intel HD 3000 or HD 4000 Anti-glare LED 1366×768 12.5
E6220 Intel core 2nd Gen Sandy Bridge

Up to i7-26x0M

Intel QM67 DDR3–1333 16 GB[c] (2 slots) Intel HD 3000 Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6205[a] or Ultimate-N 6300, or
Dell Wireless: 1501 (802.11b/g/n 1x1), or 1530 (802.11a/g/n 2x2)
Anti-glare LED 1366×768 12.5 24.7 309 226 3.17 lbs
(3-cell)
E4200 2008 Intel Core 2 Duo up to SP9600 Intel GS45 DDR3-1066 5GB (1 slot, 1GB onboard) Intel GMA 4500MHD Dell Wireless: 1397 (802.11g), or 1510 (802.11a/g/n 2x2),
Intel WiFi Link: 5100 (802.11a/g/n 1x2),
or 5300 (802.11a/g/n 3x3)
LED backlit 1280×800 12.5 19.2 209.6 204 1 kg

(4-cell)

Midrange
15"
E5570 2016 Intel Core 6th Gen Skylake ULV or 45w

Up to 6600u or 6820HQ

DDR4-2133 32 GB (2 slots) Intel HD Graphics530
Option + AMD Radeon R7 M370
Intel Wireless-AC 8260 (802.11ac 2x2)

Dell Wireless: 1820 (802.11ac 2x2)

Anti-glare LED
(opt multi-touch)
1366×768
1920×1080
15.6
E5550 2015 Intel Core 5th Gen Broadwell ULV

Up to 5600u

DDR3L-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 5500
Option + NVIDIA GeForce 840M
Intel Wireless-AC 7265 (802.11ac 2x2)

Dell Wireless: 1707 (802.11n 1x1)

Anti-glare LED 1366×768
1920×1080
15.6
E5540 2013 Intel Core 4th Gen Haswell ULV

Up to 4600u

DDR3L-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 4400
Option + NVIDIA GeForce 720M
Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 7260 + Bluetooth 4.0 or Ultimate-N 6300
or Dell Wireless 1601 (802.11g/n 2x2) 1506 (802.11g/n 1x1)
Anti-glare LED
(opt. + 2 finger multi-touch)
1366×768
1920×1080
15.6
E5530 2012 Intel Core i3, i5 and i7 up to i7-37x0QM Intel QM77[b]DDR3-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 3000 or HD 4000 Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6205 or 6250 or Ultimate-N 6300; or
Dell Wireless: 1504 (802.11b/g/n 1x1), or 1540 (802.11a/g/n 2x2)
Anti-glare LED 1366×768, 1600×900 15.6
E5520 2011 Intel Core 2nd Gen Sandy Bridge Intel QM67 DDR3-1333 8 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 3000 Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6205 (802.11n 2x2) or Ultimate-N 6300 (802.11n 3x3)
Dell Wireless: 1501 (802.11b/g/n 1x1); or 1530 (802.11a/g/n 2x2)
Anti-glare LED 1366×768, 1600×900 15.6
E5510 2010 Intel Core Arrandale

Up to 620m

Intel HM55 DDR3-1333 8 GB (2 slots) Intel HD Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6200 or 6250 (802.11n 2x2) or Ultimate-N 6300 (802.11n 3x3)
Dell Wireless: 1501 (802.11b/g/n 1x1); or 1520 (802.11a/g/n 2x2)
Anti-glare LED 1366×768, 1600×900 15.6 33.8 371 250 5.72 lbs
(6-cell)
14"
E5470 2016 Intel Core 6th Gen Skylake ULV or 45w

Up to 6600u or 6820HQ

DDR4-2133 32 GB (2 slots) Intel HD Graphics 530
Option + AMD Radeon R7 M370
Intel Wireless-AC 8260 (802.11ac 2x2)

Dell Wireless: 1820 (802.11ac 2x2)

Anti-glare LED
(opt multi-touch)
1366x768

1920x1080

2560x1440

14.0
E5450 2015 Intel Core 5th Gen Broadwell ULV

Up to 5600u

DDR3L-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 5500 Intel Wireless-AC 7265 (802.11ac 2x2)

Dell Wireless: 1707 (802.11n 1x1)

Anti-glare LED 1366×768

1920x1080

14.0
E5440 2013 Intel Core 4th Gen Haswell

Up to 4600u

DDR3L-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 4400
Option + NVIDIA GeForce 720M
Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 7260 + Bluetooth 4.0 or Ultimate-N 6300
or Dell Wireless 1601 (802.11g/n 2x2) 1506 (802.11g/n 1x1)
Anti-glare LED 1366×768, 1600×900 14.0
E5430 2012 Intel Core i3, i5 and i7 up to i7-37x0QM Intel QM77[b]DDR3-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 3000 or HD 4000 Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6205 or 6250 or Ultimate-N 6300; or
Dell Wireless: 1504 (802.11b/g/n 1x1), or 1540 (802.11a/g/n 2x2)
Anti-glare LED 1366×768, 1600×900 14.0
E5420[38]2011 Intel Core 2nd Gen Sandy Bridge Intel QM67 DDR3-1333 8 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 3000 Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6205 (802.11n 2x2) or Ultimate-N 6300 (802.11n 3x3)
Dell Wireless: 1501 (802.11b/g/n 1x1); or 1530 (802.11a/g/n 2x2)
Anti-glare LED 1366×768, 1600×900 14.0
E5410 2010 Intel Core Arrandale

Up to 620m

Intel HM55 DDR3-1333 8 GB (2 slots) Intel HD Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6200 or 6250 (802.11n 2x2) or Ultimate-N 6300 (802.11n 3x3)
Dell Wireless: 1501 (802.11b/g/n 1x1); or 1520 (802.11a/g/n 2x2)
Anti-glare LED 1280x800

1440x900

14.0
12"
E5270 2016 Intel Core 6th Gen Skylake ULV DDR4-2133 (2 slots) Intel HD 520 Intel Wireless-AC 8260 (802.11ac 2x2)

Dell Wireless: 1820 (802.11ac 2x2)

Anti-glare LED 1366x768

1920x1080

12.5
E5250 2015 Intel Core 5th Gen Broadwell ULV

Up to 5600u

DDR3-1600 (2 slots) Intel HD 5500 Intel Wireless-AC 7265 (802.11ac 2x2)

Dell Wireless: 1707 (802.11n 1x1)

Anti-glare LED 1366x768

1920x1080

12.5
10"
5175 10.8
Entry-Level
15"
3570 2015 Intel Core 6th Gen Skylake ULV DDR3L-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 520
Option + NVIDIA GeForce 920M
Intel Wireless-AC 3165 (802.11ac 1x1) or 8260 (802.11ac 2x2) or Wireless-N 7265 (802.11n)

Dell Wireless 1802 (802.11ac 2x2)

Anti-glare LED 1366×768

1920x1080

15.6 23.25 380 260 2.06 kg (4 cell)
3560 2014 Intel Core 5th Gen Broadwell ULV

Up to 5500u

DDR3L-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 5500
Option + NVIDIA GeForce 920M
Intel Wireless-AC 3165 (802.11ac 1x1) or 8260 (802.11ac 2x2) or Wireless-N 7265 (802.11n)

Dell Wireless 1802 (802.11ac 2x2)

Anti-glare LED 1366×768

1920x1080

15.6 23.25 380 260 2.06 kg (4 cell)
3550 Intel Core 5th Gen Broadwell ULV

Up to 5500u

DDR3L-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 4400
Option + NVIDIA GeForce 830M
Realtek ALC3234 Intel Wireless-AC 7265 (802.11ac 2x2)

Dell Wireless: 1707 (802.11n 1x1)

Anti-glare LED 1366×768

1920x1080

15.6 23 380 259
3540 2013 Intel Core 4th Gen Haswell ULV

Up to 4500u

DDR3L-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 4400
Option + AMD HD 8550M
Intel Wireless-N 7260 (802.11ac 2x2)

Dell Wireless: 1705 (802.11.n 1x1)

Anti-glare LED
(opt. + 2 finger multi-touch)
1366×768

1920x1080

15.6
14"
3470 2013 Intel Core 6th Gen Skylake ULV DDR3L-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 520
Option + NVIDIA GeForce 920M
Intel Wireless-AC 3165 (802.11ac 1x1) or 8260 (802.11ac 2x2) or Wireless-N 7265 (802.11n)

Dell Wireless 1802 (802.11ac 2x2)

Anti-glare LED 1366×768

1920x1080

14.0 23.15 342 243 1.8 kg (4 cell)
3460 2014 Intel Core 5th Gen Broadwell ULV

Up to 5500u

DDR3L-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 5500
Option + NVIDIA GeForce 920M
Intel Wireless-AC 3165 (802.11ac 1x1) or 8260 (802.11ac 2x2) or Wireless-N 7265 (802.11n)

Dell Wireless 1802 (802.11ac 2x2)

Anti-glare LED 1366×768

1920x1080

14.0 23.15 342 243 1.8 kg (4 cell)
3450[39]Intel Core 5th Gen Broadwell ULV

Up to 5500u

DDR3L-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 4400
Option + NVIDIA GeForce 830M
Realtek ALC3234 Intel Wireless-AC 7265 (802.11ac 2x2)

Dell Wireless: 1707 (802.11n 1x1)

Anti-glare LED 1366x768 14.0
3440 2013 Intel Core 4th Gen Haswell ULV

Up to 4500u

DDR3L-1600 16 GB (2 slots) Intel HD 4400
Option + AMD HD 8550M
Intel Wireless-N 7260 (802.11ac 2x2)

Dell Wireless: 1705 (802.11.n 1x1)

Anti-glare LED 1366×768

1600x900

14.0
13"
3379
3350
3340
11.6"
3160 11.6"
3150 11.6"
10.1"
2120 Intel Atom N455/N550 NM10 DDR3 2 GB (1 slot) Intel GMA 3150
Option + Broadcom Crystal HD Media Accelerator
Anti-glare LED 1024x600, 1366x768 10.1"
2110 Intel Atom N470 NM10 DDR2 2 GB (1 slot) Intel GMA 3150
Option + Broadcom Crystal HD Media Accelerator
Anti-glare LED 1024x600, 1366x768 10.1"
2100 Intel Atom N270 DDR2 Intel GMA 950 1024x576 10.1"
Gray colored cards - switchable graphics (AMD Dynamic Switchable Graphics or Nvidia Optimus)
Red colored cards - non-switchable discrete graphics
(may be changed for purchase time only)
  1. ^ abcdOptionally WiMax
  2. ^ abcdeOptional Intel Rapid Start Technology, Intel Smart Connect Technology (SSD required)
  3. ^ abcdefofficially supported 8 GB[36]
  4. ^ ab16 GB with Quad-Core i7, only models with dedicated graphics
  5. ^And optional Intel Smart Connect Technology (SSD required)

D-Family (2003-2007)[edit]

Model ReleaseCousin model CPU ChipsetMemory Graphics Audio codecNetwork cardScreen Dimensions (mm) Weight Battery
Type Maximum Type Clock rate controller Type Resolution " Height Width Depth
12.1" ultraportable
D430 2007 Intel Core Solo ULV,
Core 2 Duo ULV (533 MHz FSB)
Intel 945GMS DDR2 – 533 MHz 2 GB (1 slot,
1 GB soldered)
Integrated (chipset)400 MHz Intel GMA 950 SigmaTel STAC 92XX LAN: Broadcom BCM57xx GbE

WLAN: Broadcom 43xx (Dell) or Intel: 3945 802.11a/b/g or 4965 802.11a/b/g/draft-n

1280×800 12.1" 25.4 295 210 1.36 kg
D420 2006 Intel Core Solo ULV,
Core Duo U2500 1.2 GHz
Intel 945GMS DDR2 – 533 MHz 2.5 GB (1 slot,
512 MB soldered)
400 MHz Intel GMA 950 LAN: Broadcom BCM57xx GbE
WLAN: Broadcom 43xx (Dell) 802.11a/b/g or Intel 3945
1280×800 12.1" 25.4 295 210 1.36 kg
D410 2005 Intel Centrino M /Pentium M ULV (Dothan) Intel 915GM DDR2 – 533 MHz 2 GB (2 slots) Intel GMA 900 (Soft Audio) 1024×768

32 bpp

12.1" 31.9 278 238 1.7 kg Warning icon
D400 2004 Intel Centrino M /Pentium M ULV (Banias) Intel 855GM DDR1 – 266 MHz 2 GB (2 slots) Intel Extreme Graphics 2 (Soft Audio) LAN:Broadcom 5705M gigabit controller
WLAN: Broadcom BCM4306 802.11a/b/g (Dell 1450 miniPCI)
CCFL 1024×768

32 bpp

12.1" 25.4 294 245 1.7 kg
15" case
D531 2007 AMD Turion 64 X2 Dual Core AMD M690TDDR2 – 667 MHz 8 GB[a] (2 slots) ATi (AMD)
Integrated (chipset)
ATi (AMD) Radeon x1270 SigmaTel STAC9205 Dell (1390 802.11b/g, 1450 802.11a/b/g, 1505 802.11draft-n) 1280×800 14.1" 35.3 365.7 262,5 2.3 kg
1280×800,

1440×900

15.4"
D530 Intel Core 2 Duo (800 MHz FSB) Intel 965GM DDR2 – 667 MHz 8 GB (2 slots) Integrated (chipset)500 MHz Intel GMA X3100 15.4" 35.3 262,5
D520 2006 Intel Core Duo,
Core 2 Duo,
Celeron M
Intel 945GM (Core Duo)
940GML (Celeron M)
DDR2 – 533/667 MHz 4 GB[b](945GM)

2 GB (940GML) (2 slots)

400 MHz Intel GMA 950 LAN: Broadcom 440x 10/100 Ethernet
WLAN:Broadcom 43xx (Dell) 802.11b/g or a/b/g or Intel 3945
1024×768 14.1" 35.8 338.3 273 2.38 kg Warning icon
1024×768,

1400×1050

15.4"
D510 2005 Intel Pentium M 730 (2 MB L2) 533 MHz FSB / Celeron M Intel 915GM DDR2 – 400/533 MHz 2 GB (2 slots) 333 MHz Intel GMA 900 SigmaTel STAC9205 LAN: Broadcom 440x 10/100 Ethernet WLAN: Intel PRO 2200 (802.11b/g) Modem: V.92 capable 56K1024×768 14.1" Warning icon
D505 2004 Inspiron 510m Intel Pentium M Banias (1 MB L2)
or Dothan (2 MB L2) 1.3 - 2.0 GHz (400 MHz FSB)
Celeron M
Intel 855GME DDR1 – 333 MHz 2 GB (2 slots) Intel Extreme Graphics 2 LAN: Broadcom 570x gigabit controller
WLAN: Intel: PRO 2100 (802.11b) or PRO 2200 (802.11b/g))
or TrueMobile (1350 (802.11b/g) or 1450 (802.11a/b/g))
Bluetooth: optional
1024×768 14.1" 31.8 338.3 273 Warning icon
1024×768,

1400×1050

15.4"
D500[c]2003 Inspiron 500m Intel Pentium M Banias (1 MB L2)
or Dothan (2 MB L2) 1.3 - 2.0 GHz (400 MHz FSB)
Celeron M
Intel 855GM DDR1 – 266 MHz 2 GB (2 slots) Intel Extreme Graphics 2 LAN: Broadcom 570x gigabit controller
WLAN: Intel: PRO 2100 (802.11b) or PRO 2200 (802.11b/g)
or TrueMobile: 1300/1350 (802.11b/g) or 1400/1450 (802.11a/b/g)
Bluetooth: optional
CCFL 1024×768
32 bpp
14.1" Warning icon
14" case
D631 2007 AMD Turion 64 X2 Dual Core AMD RS690T DDR2 – 667 MHz 8 GB[a] (2 slots) ATi (AMD) IntegratedATi (AMD) Radeon x1270 SigmaTel STAC9205 Dell: 1390 802.11b/g, 1490 802.11a/b/g, 1505 802.11a/b/g/draft-n1280×800, 1440×90014.1" 32 338 238 2.7 kg
D630 Precision M2300 Intel Core 2 Duo (800 MHz FSB) Intel 965GM DDR2 – 667 MHz 8 GB (2 slots) Integrated (chipset)
or discrete
500 MHz Intel GMA X3100 Intel: 3945 802.11a/b/g, 4965 802.11a/b/g/draft-n,
Dell: 1390 802.11b/g, 1490 802.11a/b/g, 1505 802.11a/b/g/draft-n
1280×8001440×90014.1" 32 338 238 2 kg
667 MHz NVIDIA Quadro NVS 135M (128 MB)
D620 2006 Core 2 Duo (667 MHz FSB)
Intel Core Duo (533 MHz FSB)
Intel 945GM DDR2 – 667 MHz 4 GB[b] (2 slots) 300 MHz Intel GMA 950 Intel 3945 802.11a/b/g, Dell: 1390 802.11b/g, 1490 802.11a/b/g1280×8001440×90014.1" 32 338 238 2 kg Warning icon
Intel 945PM 300 MHz NVIDIA Quadro NVS 110 (256 MB)
D610 2005 Precision M20 Intel Pentium M Dothan (2 MB L2) up to 2.13 GHz Intel 915GM DDR2 – 533 MHz 2 GB (2 slots) 350 MHz Intel GMA 900 SigmaTel C-Major
STAC9751
LAN: Broadcom 57xx Gigabit controller
WLAN: Intel (PRO 2200 (802.11b/g) or PRO/Wireless 2915ABG) or Dell 1370
Bluetooth: Dell Wireless 350 (optional)
1024×768 1400×1050

32 bpp[d]

14.1" 34 312.5 261 2.1 kg Warning icon
Intel 915PM 350 MHz ATI Mobility Radeon X300 (64 MB DDR)
D600

[40][41]

2003 Inspiron 600m Intel Pentium M Banias (1 MB L2)

or Dothan (2 MB L2) 1.3 - 2.0 GHz (400 MHz FSB)

Intel 855PM DDR1 – 266 MHz 2 GB (2 slots) Discrete200 MHz ATI Mobility Radeon 9000 (32/64 MB) SigmaTel C-Major
STAC9750
LAN: Broadcom 570x Gigabit controller
WLAN: Intel: PRO 2100 (802.11b) or PRO 2200 (802.11b/g)
or TrueMobile: 1300/1350 (802.11b/g) or 1400/1450 (802.11a/b/g)
Bluetooth: optional
CCFL 1400×1050
32 bpp or

1024×768
24 bpp

14.1" 30.5 315 256,5 2.1 kg Warning icon
15" case, performance
D830 2007 Precision M4300 Intel Core 2 Duo (800 MHz FSB) Intel 965GM DDR2 – 667 MHz 8 GB[a] (2 slots) Integrated (chipset)
or discrete
Intel GMA X3100 Intel: 3945 802.11a/b/g, 4965 802.11a/b/g/draft-n,
Dell: 1390 802.11b/g, 1490 802.11a/b/g, 1505 802.11a/b/g/draft-n
1280×800
1680×1050
1920×1200
15.4"
ntel 965PM NVIDIA Quadro NVS 135M (256 MB)
or Quadro NVS 140M (256 MB)
D820 2006 Precision M65 Core 2 Duo (667 MHz FSB)
Intel Core Duo (533 MHz FSB)
Intel 945GM DDR2 – 667 MHz 4 GB[b] (2 slots) Intel GMA 950 LAN: Broadcom 57xx Gigabit controller
WLAN: Intel 3945 802.11a/b/g, Dell 1490 802.11a/b/g
1280×800
1680×1050 1920×1200
15.4" 38 368 266.5
Intel 945PM or NVIDIA Quadro NVS 120 (256 MB)
D810 2005 Precision M70 Intel Pentium M Dothan (2 MB L2) up to 2.26 GHz Intel 915PM DDR2 – 533 MHz 2 GB (2 slots) DiscreteATI Mobility Radeon x300 (64/128 MB) 15.4" Warning icon
or Mobility Radeon x600 (128 MB)
D800 2003 Inspiron 8500

Inspiron 8600 Precision M60

Intel Pentium M Banias (1 MB L2)
or Dothan (2 MB L2) 1.3 - 1.8 GHz (400 MHz FSB)
Intel 855PM DDR1 – 266 MHz 2 GB (2 slots) nVidia GeForce4 4200 Go (32 MB) CCFL 15.4" Warning icon
or GeForce FX Go5200 (32/64 MB
or GeForce FX Go5650 (128 MB
Model ReleaseCousin model CPU ChipsetType Maximum Type Clock rate Video adapter Audio codecNetwork cardType Resolution " Height Width Depth Weight Battery
Memory Graphics Screen Dimensions (mm)
  1. ^ abcofficially supported 4 GB
  2. ^ abcUsable RAM limited to 3.25 GB by chipset
  3. ^This Laptop is a clone of a Dell Latitude D600
  4. ^integrated graphics chipset supports up to 1600×1200 pixels / Mobility Radeon X300 supports up to 2048×1152 pixels with external monitor

X-Family (2002-2011)[edit]

Model ReleaseInspiron cousinCPUChipsetMemory Graphics Audio codecNetwork cardScreen Dimensions (mm) Weight
Type Maximum Type Clock rate controller Allocated memory Type Maximum resolution Height Width Depth
12.1" Convertible Tablet PC
XT3 2011 Up to an Intel Core i7-2640m Intel QM67 DDR3 – 1333 mHz 16 GB ( 2 slots ) Integrated (chipset)1.30GHz Intel HD 3000 Dynamically assigned up to 2GB IDT HD92xx WLAN:Intel Centrino: Advanced-N 6205 or Ultimate-N 6300; or
Dell Wireless: 1501 (802.11b/g/n 1x1); or 1530 (802.11a/g/n 2x2)
IPS LED 1366x768 30.9 323 221.7 2.02 kg (6 cell stock)
XT2 2008 Intel Core 2 Duo (1.2, 1.4 or 1.6 GHz) Intel GS45[a]DDR3 –800 MHz 5 GB (1 GB soldered + 1 slot) 475 MHz Intel GMA 4500MHD up to 384 MB IDT 92HD71B7 LAN:Intel 82567LF Gigabit Network (10/100/1000 Mbit/s)
WLAN:Intel Wi-Fi Link (5100AGN or 5300AGN)
or Dell Wireless (1397 (802.11g) or 1510 (802.11a/g/n 2x2))
LED 1280×768 32 bpp 27.4 220.6 297 1.62 kg

(28 WHr battery)

XT 2007 Intel Core 2 Duo
(1.33 GHz) U7700
Radeon Xpress 1250 DDR2 –667 MHz 3 GB (1 GB soldered + 1 slot) 350 MHz ATI Radeon X300 up to 384 MB SigmaTel STAC9205 Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit Ethernet (10/100/1000 Mbit/s)
WLAN: Intel Wireless Wi-Fi Link 4965AGN
400 cd/m2 CCFL
or 230 cd/m2 LED
1280×768 32 bpp 25 218 297 1.69 kg

(42 WHr battery)

12.1"
X1[b]2005 Intel Pentium M Intel 915GMS DDR2 –400 MHz 2.25 GB (256 MB soldered + 1 slot) Integrated (chipset)350 MHz Intel GMA 900 SigmaTel C-Major
STAC9751
Broadcom NetXtreme BCM5751 Gigabit Ethernet PCI Express
MiniPCI card for Wireless LAN
CCFL 1280×768 32 bpp 25 286 196.8 1.14 kg

(27-WHr battery)

X300 2003 300M Intel Pentium M Intel 855GM DDR1 – 266 MHz 1.15 GB (128 MB soldered + 1 slot) 133 MHz Intel Extreme Graphics 2 32 - 64 SigmaTel C-Major
STAC9750
Broadcom 570x Gigabit Series CCFL 1024×768 32 bpp 22.2 275 233.6 1.31 kg

(28-WHr battery)

X200 2002 Intel PIII Mobile Intel 830MG SDRAM – 133 MHz 630 MB (128 MB soldered + 1 slot) 133 MHz Intel Extreme Graphics 32 - 48 Cirrus Logic CS4299 3c905C-TX CCFL 1024×768 18 bpp ≈24 273 226 1.31 kg

(27-WHr battery)

  1. ^GM45 in small package
  2. ^fanless computer using 1.8-inch PATA HDD

V-Family (2000-2002)[edit]

Model ReleaseCousin modelCPU ChipsetMemory Graphics Audio codecScreen Dimensions (mm) Weight
Type Maximum Type Clock rate Controller Allocated memory Type Resolution"Height Width Depth
V700 2000 Inspiron 2500 Intel PIII Mobile Intel 815E SDRAM – 100 MHz 512 MB (2 slots) Integrated (chipset)3D graphics with Direct AGP 32 MB SigmaTel C-Major
STAC9700
3Com 10/100 LAN
56K V.90 Mini-PCI modem
CCFL 1024×768

32 bpp

14.1"
V710 2001 Inspiron 2600 Intel PIII Mobile Intel 830M SDRAM– 133 MHz 512 MB (2 slots) Integrated (chipset)166 MHz Intel Extreme Graphics 32 or 64 MBSigmaTel C-Major
STAC9700
3Com 10/100 LAN
56K V.90 Mini-PCI modem
CCFL 1024×768

32 bpp

14.1" 37 328 274 3.2 kg
V740 2002 Inspiron 2650 Intel P4-MIntel 845MP DDR1 – 266 MHz 512 MB (2 slots) DiscretenVidia GeForce2 Go (16 or 32 MB) SigmaTel C-Major
STAC9700
3Com 10/100 LAN
56K V.90 Mini-PCI modem
CCFL 1024×768

32 bpp

14.1" 36 328 275 3.2 kg

C-Family (1999-2002)[edit]

All screens have a TN active-LCD matrix and a CCFL backlit.

Model ReleaseCousin modelCPU ChipsetMemory Graphics Audio codecScreen Dimensions (mm) Weight
Type Maximum Type Clock rate Controller Allocated memory Type Resolution"Height Width Depth
C400 2001 Intel PIII MobileIntel 830M SDRAM– 133 MHz 1 GB (2 slots)[a]Integrated (chipset)166 MHz Intel Extreme Graphics 32 or 64 MBCirrus Logic CS4205 3Com 10/100 LAN CCFL 1024×768

18 bpp

12.1" 26.6-30.5 290 238 1.63 kg

(4-cell battery)

C540 2002 Inspiron 4100 Mobile Intel CeleronIntel 845M DDR1 – 266 MHz 1 GB (2 slots) DiscreteATI Mobility Radeon 7500C (32 MB) Cirrus Logic CS4205 V.92 capable 56K MDC softmodem CCFL 1400×1050

32 bpp

14.1" 36,5 319 254 5.73 lb[b]
C510 2001 Inspiron 4000 Intel Celeron (PIII-based) Mobile Intel 830M SDRAM – 133 MHz 1 GB (2 slots) ATI Mobility Radeon M6P (16 MB) Cirrus Logic CS4205 Dell TrueMobile 1150 Mini-PCI Wireless[c]CCFL 1024×768

32 bpp

14.1" 36,5 319 254 5.73 lb[b]
C500 2000 Inspiron 4000 Intel Celeron Mobile
mini-ZIF
Intel 440BX

SDRAM –
66/100 MHz[d]

512 MB (2 slots) 133 MHz ATi Mobility Radeon M3 (8 MB) ESS Maestro 3i 3Com 10/100 LAN
56K V.90 Mini-PCI modem
CCFL

1024×768,
18 bpp

14.1"
C640 2002 Inspiron 4150 Intel P4-MIntel 845M DDR1 – 266 MHz 2 GB[e] (2 slots) DiscreteATI Mobility Radeon 7500C (32 MB) Cirrus Logic CS4205 V.92 capable 56K MDC softmodem CCFL 1400×1050, 32 bpp 14.1" 36,5 319 254 5.73 lb[b]
C610 2001 Inspiron 4100 Intel PIII Mobile Intel 830M SDRAM – 133 MHz 1 GB (2 slots) ATI Mobility Radeon M6P (16 MB) Cirrus Logic CS4205 Dell TrueMobile 1150 Mini-PCI Wireless[c]CCFL

1024×768,
1400×1050, 32 bpp

14.1" 36,5 319 254 5.73 lb[b]
C600 2000 Inspiron 4000 Intel PIII Mobile Intel 440BXSDRAM – 100 MHz 512 MB (2 slots) 133 MHz ATi Mobility Radeon M3 (8 MB) ESS Maestro 3i 56K V.90 Mini-PCI modem[c]CCFL 1600×1200, 32 bpp14.1" 38,5 319 254 5.51 lb[b]
C840 2002 Inspiron 8200
Precision M50
Intel P4-MIntel 845MP DDR1 – 266 MHz 2 GB[e] (2 slots) Discrete220 MHz nVidia GeForce4 440 Go (64 MB) Cirrus Logic CS4205[f]Mini-PCI Wireless card capable CCFL 1600x1200, 32 bpp 15.1"
C810 2001 Inspiron 8100

Precision M40

Intel PIII Mobile Intel 815E SDRAM – 133 MHz 512 MB (2 slots) nVidia GeForce2 Go (16 or 32 MB) ESS Maestro 3i 56K V.90 Mini-PCI modem[c]CCFL 1400×1050,

1600×1200, 32 bpp

14.1 / 15"
C800 2000 Inspiron 8000

Inspiron 2500

Intel PIII Mobile Intel 815E SDRAM – 100 MHz 512 MB (2 slots) 105 MHz ATi Mobility Radeon M4 (8 or 16 MB) ESS Maestro 3i 56K V.90 Mini-PCI modem[c]CCFL 1600×1200, 32 bpp 15" 44,5 330 276 7.67 lb[g]
CPx J650GT 1999 Inspiron 3800 Intel PIII Mobile Intel 440BXSDRAM – 100 MHz 512 MB (2 slots) ATI Mobility Rage Pro M1 (4 MB) ESS Maestro 3i 56K V.90 Mini-PCI modem[c]CCFL 1024×768

32 bpp

14.1" 45 320 255,5
  1. ^1 user-accessible
  2. ^ abcde with CD-ROM module
  3. ^ abcdefOptional
  4. ^PC66, or PC100 specially selected RAM
  5. ^ abMotherboard supports 1 GB SODIMMs (unavailable at time of laptop release, regular configuration is 2x215 MB)
  6. ^on Intel 82801CAM ICH3-M South Bridge
  7. ^with FDD module

L-Family (1999-2006)[edit]

All screens have a TN active-LCD matrix and a CCFL-backlit.

Model ReleaseInspiron cousinCPU ChipsetMemory Graphics Audio codecNetwork cardScreen Dimensions (mm) Weight
Type Maximum Video type Clock rate Controller Memory Type Resolution " Height Width Depth
15.4"
131L 2006 1501 AMD Turion 64 X2 ATI Radeon Xpress 1150 DDR2 – 533 MHz 2 GB (2 slots) 400 MHz ATI Radeon Xpress 1150 (integrated) 256 MB HyperMemoryDell Wireless 1490 (802.11a/g) CCFL 1280×800 14,1 / 15,4 36 356 266 2.83 kg
120L 2006 1300 Pentium or Celeron M Intel 910GML DDR2-533 MHz 2 GB (2 slots) Intel GMA 900 Up to 128 MB Dell Wireless 1470/1370 CCFL 1280x800 14/15.6 36 356 266 2.85
110L 2005 1000 CCFL
100L 2004 1150 CCFL
12.1" ultraportable
L400 2001 2100 Intel PIII Mobile Intel 440BXSDRAM – 100 MHz 256 MB (1 slot) ATI Mobility M 4 MB Crystal CS4281 + CS4297A 3Com 3C920 CCFL 1024×768 18 bpp 12,1 25,7 272 220 1,63 kg 6-cell / 1,56 kg 4-cell
LS 1999 2000 Intel PIII Mobile Intel 440BXSDRAM – 100 MHz 256 MB (1 slot) NeoMagic NM2200 2,5 MB NeoMagic NMG5 CCFL 800×600 18 bpp 12,1 25,7 272 220 1,66 kg 6-cell / 1,62 kg 4-cell

CS-Family (1998-1999)[edit]

Model Release CPU ChipsetMemory Graphics Audio codecNetwork cardScreen Dimensions (mm) Weight
Type Maximum Type Clock rate Controller Memory Type Resolution " Height Width Depth
CS R 1999 Intel 440BXSDRAM – 66 MHz 512 MB (2 slots) NeoMagic MagicMedia 256 ZX 4 MB NeoMagic MagicMedia 256 ZX CCFL 800×600
1024×768 16 bpp
13,3 29 306 246 1.89 kg 6-cell
CSx 1999 Intel PIII Mobile Intel 440BXSDRAM – 66 MHz 512 MB (2 slots) NeoMagic MagicMedia 256 ZX 4 MB NeoMagic MagicMedia 256 ZX CCFL 1024×768 16 bpp 13,3 29 306 246 1.95 kg 4-cell
CS[42]1998 Intel PII Mobile Intel 440BXSDRAM – 66 MHz 512 MB (2 slots) NeoMagic MagicMedia 256 ZX 4 MB NeoMagic MagicMedia 256 ZX CCFL 1024×768 16 bpp 13,3 29 306 246 1.95 kg 4-cell

CP-Family (1997-1999)[edit]

Model Release CPU ChipsetMemory Graphics Audio codecNetwork cardScreen Dimensions (mm) Weight
Type Maximum Type Clock rate Controller Memory Type Resolution " Height Width Depth
CPx Pentium III 750 MHz;
CPi[43][44]1998 to 1999 Intel Pentium II 233-400 MHz Intel 440BX EDO(D series)/SDRAM(A series) 256 MB (2 slots) or 128 MB(2 slots) for D series 64-bit (128-bit hardware - accelerated) PCI NeoMagic 2160 2.0 MB internal EDO RAM Crystal 4237B

/

NeoMagic MagicMedia 256 (A models)

TFT 800x600

1024×768

13.3

12.1

44.1 306 241 2.8 kg
CP 1997 to 1998 Intel Pentium MMX 166 to 233 MHz Intel 430TX EDO 128 MB (2 slots) NeoMagic 2160 2.0 MB internal EDO RAM Crystal 4237B TFT 800x600 12.1 38.6 306 241 2.5 kg

XP-Family (1994-1998)[edit]

Latitude XP noticed as a first laptop with an optional Lithium-ion battery.[45] For XPi and earlier models BIOS limited to an 8.4gb or smaller hard drive. XPi CD is a last mass-market laptop with a optical trackball.

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dell_Latitude
Dell Latitude E6410 Overview

Dell Latitude E6410

Specifications

Dell Latitude E6410

Memory

4096 MB  , DDR3 PC3-8500F, 2x2048MB, max. 8GB

Display

14.10 inch 16:9, 1440 x 900 pixel, Anti-Glare LED display, glossy: no

Mainboard

Intel QM57 Express Chipset

Storage

Samsung SSD 800 Series, 256 GB  , 2.5" 256GB

Connections

1 PC-Card, 3 USB 2.0, 1 Firewire, 1 VGA, 1 DisplayPort, optional Modem, 1 Kensington Lock, 1 eSata, 1 Docking Station Port, Audio Connections: Headphone, microphone, Card Reader: 6in1 Cardreader

Networking

Intel 82577LM Gigabit Network Connection (10/100/1000/2500/5000MBit/s), Intel Centrino Ultimate-N 6300 AGN (a/g/n = Wi-Fi 4), Bluetooth Dell Wireless 375 Bluetooth 3.0, HSPA/GPS, WiMax optional

Optical drive

TSSTcorp CDDVDW TS-U633F

Size

height x width x depth (in mm): 31 x 335 x 238 ( = 1.22 x 13.19 x 9.37 in)

Battery

60 Wh Lithium-Ion, 6-cell 11.1V

Operating System

Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 32 Bit

Camera

Webcam: 3 MP Webcam

Additional features

36 Months Warranty

Weight

2.24 kg ( = 79.01 oz / 4.94 pounds), Power Supply: 420 g ( = 14.82 oz / 0.93 pounds)

 

Pricecompare

Dell Latitude E6410Average Score:84.29% - good
Average of 7 scores (from 12 reviews)

price: 68%, performance: 81%, features: 83%, display: 73% mobility: 81%, workmanship: 82%, ergonomy: 85%, emissions: 88%

Reviews for the Dell Latitude E6410

85%Review Dell Latitude E6410 Notebook | Notebookcheck
Working faster. We are facing a representative of Dell's high-end "mainstream" range of Latitude Business notebooks. Equipped with powerful components (Core i7, SSD), the 14 inch laptop is recommendable for ambitioned business users with mobility needs.

Dell Latitude E6410 Review
Source: Laptop LogicEnglish
If you are planning to buy a new Dell Business Laptop, then there are multiple options available. Latitude E6410 is the latest addition to the range of Dell Business Laptops. It has a very modern look, great styling and it is powered by latest Intel processor. It weighs within 2.3 kgs and hence it is quite popular amongst the business laptop segment.
Single Review, online available, Very Short, Date: 09/21/2011
Dell Latitude E6410: Minding Intel's Business
Source: AnandTechEnglish
Dell didn't send us this laptop, and it may not be their best foot forward. That's not to say that the E6410 is a bad laptop, but like the ThinkPad T-series there's a price premium for the build quality and reliability. During the past month or so of using the E6410 as my primary work/travel laptop, I've been quite happy with it. It's not too heavy, plenty fast, and gets good battery life.
Single Review, online available, Long, Date: 12/02/2010
Dell Latitude E6410 User Review
Source: Notebookreview.comEnglish
Two years ago I bought a Latitude E6400 and shared my findings (see my review here). It has provided two years of trouble-free service in a range of countries and conditions. However, the time has come for me to consider replacing it with something newer and, hopefully, faster and the logical contender for this role is the E6410. Fortunately Dell has had the wisdom to keep the 16:10 display for this model).
User Review, online available, Long, Date: 11/10/2010
Rating:price: 90% performance: 90%
90%Dell Latitude E6410 Review
Source: Notebookreview.comEnglish
The Dell Latitude E6410 is a 14.1-inch business notebook configurable with an Intel Core i7 processor and NVIDIA NVS 3100M dedicated graphics.
Single Review, online available, Long, Date: 11/01/2010
Rating:Total score: 90% price: 80% performance: 90%
89%Dell Latitude E6410
Source: Computer ShopperEnglish
The E6410 comes clad in Dell’s Tri-Metal casing, which mixes magnesium alloy, aluminum, and zinc to create a rigid, lightweight exoskeleton. The Latitude E6410 delivers performance, features, and a bit of style to the mainstream-business-notebook crowd. An enterprise won’t go wrong standardizing on this flexible platform for years to come.
Single Review, online available, Long, Date: 08/01/2010
Rating:Total score: 89%
80%Dell Latitude E6410 review
Source: Tech AdvisorEnglish
The Dell Latitude E6410 is a solid 14in business laptop with an incredible turn of speed when decked out with the Core i7-620M and 256GB SSD. Prices may start at £949, but the version we tested with the best processor and storage options gave a bottom line price of £2129 inc VAT. But if you want a classic business laptop that is unfeasibly fast yet tame to the touch, look no further than this Dell Latitude.
Single Review, online available, Medium, Date: 07/01/2010
Rating:Total score: 80% price: 60% features: 90% workmanship: 80%

Foreign Reviews

Verwandlungskünstler
Source: c't- 2/11German
Comparison, , Long, Date: 01/01/2011
Rating:performance: 65% features: 80% display: 70% mobility: 70% ergonomy: 80% emissions: 80%
88%Test Dell Latitude E6410 Notebook
Source: NotebookcheckGermanDE→EN
Single Review, online available, Long, Date: 06/20/2010
Rating:Total score: 88% performance: 84% display: 75% mobility: 86% workmanship: 90% ergonomy: 87% emissions: 92%
88%Test Dell Latitude E6410 Notebook
Source: NotebookcheckGermanDE→EN
Single Review, online available, Long, Date: 06/20/2010
Rating:Total score: 88% performance: 84% display: 75% mobility: 86% workmanship: 90% ergonomy: 87% emissions: 92%
70%Dell Latitude E6410
Source: Notebookforum.atGermanDE→EN
Single Review, online available, Long, Date: 05/09/2010
Rating:Total score: 70%
DELL Latitude E6410 - na práci především
Source: Notebook.czCZ→EN
Single Review, online available, Medium, Date: 06/22/2010
Rating:price: 40% workmanship: 60%

Comment

Intel Graphics Media Accelerator (GMA) HD Graphics: Onboard graphics card that is built in the new Arrandale CPUs (Core i3 / i5 / i7 Dual Cores). Depending on the model and Turbo Boost, the GMA HD is clocked between 166 and 766 MHz.

Only some 3D games with very low demands are playable with these cards.

» Further information can be found in our Comparison of Mobile Graphics Cards and the corresponding Benchmark List.


Intel Core i7: The Intel Core i7 for laptops is based on the LG1156 Core i5/i7 CPU for desktops. The base clock speed of the CPUs is relatively low, but because of a huge Turbo mode, the cores can dynamically overclock to up to 3.2 GHz (920XM). Therefore, the CPU can be as fast as high clocked dual-core CPUs (using single threaded applications) but still offer the advantage of 4 cores. Because of the large TDP of 45 W / 55 W, the CPU is only intended for large laptops.  


620M:

The Core i7-620M is the fastest Dual-Core CPU for laptops (at the time of introduction in Q1 2010). The 620M clocks betwenn 2.66 and 3.33 GHz due to the Turbo Mode and because of Hyperthreading, 4 threads are executed simultaneously. In the package, Intel also included a second die with an integrated GPU (GMA HD) and a memory controller. Therefore, the TDP of 35 Watt of the whole package is still quite good.

» Further information can be found in our Comparison of Mobile Processsors.

14.10":

This display size represents a treshold between the small sizes of subnotebooks and ultrabooks and the standard-sizes of office- and multimedia laptops on the other hand. Laptops with that size are somewhat rare, nowadays.

» To find out how fine a display is, see our DPI List.

2.24 kg:

Usually subnotebooks, ultrabooks and quite lightweight laptops with 12-16 inch display-diagonal weigh as much.


Dell: Dell Inc. is a multinational technology corporation that develops, manufactures, sells, and supports personal computers and other computer-related products. Based in Texas, Dell employs more than 82,700 people worldwide (2009). In 2006, Dell purchased the computer hardware manufacturer Alienware. In most countries, the laptops are directly sold to consumers by Dell and each notebook custom-assembled according to a selection of options. In 2014, the global market share of Dell laptops was 12.3% and it is 14% in 2016.


84.29%: This rating should be considered to be average. This is because the proportion of notebooks which have a higher rating is approximately equal to the proportion which have a lower rating.


» Further information can be found in our Notebook Purchase Guide.

 

Sours: https://www.notebookcheck.net/Dell-Latitude-E6410.30862.0.html

Latitude year dell made e6410

Latitude E6410 Laptop

International On-site Service provides service and support for your Dell laptop while you are traveling.

Specialized On-site Options enables you to augment your daily IT management or tap into specific technical expertise for critical projects when needed. Recommended options for laptops include:
  • On-site Parts Management to help minimize downtime by having parts at your fingertips
  • On-site Personnel to augment your IT staff
  • On-site Diagnosis for accelerated troubleshooting
Asset Management and Protection
  • Accidental Damage Protection* repairs or replaces accidentally damaged systems.
  • Laptop Tracking and Recovery tracks lost or stolen systems.
  • Extended Battery Service covers an optional replacement battery during a system’s three-year limited warranty* period.

Data Management and Protection
  • Keep Your Hard Drive* helps you retain control of sensitive data.
  • Hard Drive Data Recovery provides unlimited attempts to recover data from a failed hard drive.
  • Remote Data Deletion can remotely delete data if your system goes missing due to loss or theft.
  • Certified Data Destruction wipes your hard drive clean and destroys data.
Enterprise-Wide Contract provides enhanced proactive capabilities through:
  • Designated Service Delivery Manager
  • Performance benchmarking and custom reporting
  • Planning and assessments
Sours: https://www.dell.com/us/en/business/notebooks/latitude-e6410/pd.aspx?refid=latitude-e6410&s=bsd&cs=04
Hướng dẫn tháo lắp - vệ sinh laptop Dell E6410

Dell Latitude E6410 Review

The Latitude E6410 is the latest in a long line of business notebooks from Dell. Sporting a wide range of Intel Core processor options, Intel integrated and NVIDIA NVS 3100M dedicated graphics, and two display options. In this review we see how this Dell business notebook compares to others already on the market.

Our Dell Latitude E6410 Specifications:

  • 14.1 LED-backlit WXGA+ 1440×900 Display
  • Windows 7 Professional 64-bit
  • Intel Core i7 620M processor (2.66GHz, 4MB cache)
  • NVIDIA NVS 3100M Dedicated Graphics with 512MB VRAM
  • 4GB DDR3 RAM
  • 250GB 7200RPM hard drive (Western Digital Scorpio Black)
  • Intel Wireless Wi-Fi 6200AGN
  • Built-in Bluetooth v2.1+EDR
  • 8X DVD burner
  • One-year limited warranty
  • 9-cell Li-ion battery (85Wh)
  • Weight: 4.26lbs starting (5.5lbs configured)
  • Dimensions: 13.2 x 9.4 x 1-1.2-inches
  • MSRP: $960 starting ($1,865 closest configuration)

Build and Design
The Dell Latitude E6410 has a very modern look and feel, with a few changes this generation to give a nod towards past models. The E6400 brought the latest body style, with a black alloy shell. The E6410 this time around keeps the body style, but switches back to the gunmetal gray coloring scheme which was found on the D630 and D620 before it. The finish has a pseudo-brushed appearance (painted, not actual brushed metal like on the HP EliteBook) that seems to resist fingerprints more than the real thing. The lower half of the notebook keeps the black metal design, with a large service panel that lets you access everything in the notebook by removing a single screw.

Inside the E6410 the look is matte black on everything besides the keyboard and model lettering. Compared to what you might find in a consumer model, there are no glossy or reflective surfaces besides the small chrome lettering on the Dell branding logo. This is nice if you use your notebook in brightly lit areas where reflections can be distracting. It also means that smudges and fingerprints won’t be a problem from day-to-day use.

Build quality is very good and if feels very durable with the metal panels top and bottom. In the business notebook market not all makers have stuck with metal body panels. After the T60-series ThinkPad, Lenovo switched to a plastic top cover, which has stuck for every generation since then. The HP EliteBook though keeps the metal top cover and retains the image and feel of a higher-grade notebook over a standard plastic consumer model.

The Latitude E6410 chassis felt very well built and resisted any flexing in the usual spots. The palmrest and touchpad showed no signs of sag under heavy prodding. The keyboard directly over the optical drive stayed firm, even though most notebooks do show some signs of weakness in this area. Grabbing the notebook by the palmrest and carrying it around didn’t cause any twisting or creaking noises. With the notebook closed the screen cover gave above average protection for the screen and should prevent any keyboard key marks on from imprinting on the LCD after being transported in a backpack loaded with other items. With the notebook open it took a good amount of pressure applied to the back of the cover before it showed any ripples or distortions on the display.

Users looking to upgrade parts of IT staff looking to replacing components will find the Latitude E6410 very easy to service. Dell designed the entire bottom around a single access panel with a single screw holding it in place. After removing the screen (which is retained with a spring so it never gets lost) you simply slide the cover down about a smidge and pop it off. With the cover removed you gain access to the WWAN, Wi-Fi card, memory slots, processor and heatsink, CMOS battery, cooling fan, and the instant-on OS card. Outside of having a cover that removes by the thought of wanting to upgrade alone, the E6410 is probably the easiest notebook we have come across to upgrade.


Ports and Features

The Latitude E6410 is packed with a ton of connections, including three USB 2.0 ports, an eSATA/USB combo port, VGA and DisplayPort-out, audio jacks, LAN, and FireWire-400. Other features include an optical drive, SDHC-card reader, and a SmartCard reader.


Front: SDHC-card slot

Rear: LAN, DisplayPort-out, power jack

Left: Kensington lock slot, VGA-out,
one USB 2.0, eSATA/USB, SmartCard reader

Right: ExpressCard/54 slot, FireWire-400, optical drive, audio jacks, wireless on/off, two USB 2.0 ports.

Screen and Speakers
The Dell offers two display options with the 14.1-inch Latitude E6410. The base screen is a WXGA 1280×800 resolution panel, while the step up-which is what our review unit came with-is a WXGA+ 1440×900 panel. Both panel offerings have matte surfaces, instead of the glare-prone glossy displays. The higher resolution lets you display more in the screen and is greatly preferred if you do anything from surfing the web to typing documents. In our tests the screen performed about average in terms of color saturation and contrast, falling behind compared to some of the nicer panels we have seen on consumer notebooks. With our light meter we measured an average contrast ratio of 140:1, which is well below most consumer panels.

This isn’t far from other business notebooks though. Peak brightness measured in at 336nit, which is great for viewing outdoors in partially shaded areas or under bright office lighting. Backlight brightness was even across the panel, with only a 20nit spread between center and the left and right sides. No backlight bleed was seen around the edges or at the corners either. Viewing angles were average, with the vertical viewing range spanning from 15-20 degrees tilted forward or back. Horizontal viewing angles were better, with colors staying true to 60-75 degrees off-center.

The Latitude E6410 features narrow stereo speakers located on each side of the keyboard. For business use they were more than adequate, offering plenty of volume for listening to music in small to midsize rooms. Audio quality was average, with some midrange and good high notes. Bass was lacking, but this was a given without a subwoofer. External outputs include an analog headphone jack, which will work with most external speakers.

Keyboard and Touchpad
The Dell Latitude E6410 has a very comfortable LED backlit keyboard. The keyboard hasn’t changed much from the previous generation, keeping the same look and feel, as well as the built-in pointing stick. The keyboard keys are jet-black with bright white lettering and have minimal cupping. The feel is similar to typing on a Chiclet style keyboard, but the keys don’t have the same sharp cutoff like you might find on those types of keyboards. Typing pressure is minimal, with each press making a very mild click when the key is fully triggered. Compared to my Latitude D630, typing noise has been significantly reduced. Overall compared to the other business notebooks, the E6410’s keyboard stacks up very well, and has an edge when it comes to lighting.

Dell incorporates an ALPS touchpad into the E6410, which has thankfully improved from past years. The moderate amount of lag found in older revisions is completely gone, making the navigation experience much nicer. Sensitivity is great with default settings, although we still had some problems with a tap to drag event not fully releasing of the object you were moving. The touchpad also features two and three-finger gestures for scrolling, zooming, and flicking. With the pointing stick included with the keyboard, the E6410 features two sets of buttons. The top-most buttons for the pointing stick include a middle button which can be configured to control tabs. The buttons are all great to use, with good feedback and a long throw.

Performance and Benchmarks
System performance was great with the 2.66GHz Intel Core i7 processor and NVIDIA NVS 3100M dedicated graphics with 512MB of video memory. Dell offers a wide range of performance options, including two graphics cards options; Intel GMA HD integrated and NVIDIA NVS 3100 dedicated with 512MB of VRAM. Hard drive options include a 5400 and 7200RPM models and a 128GB SSD. Our particular unit came with a 250GB 7200RPM Scorpio Black that was quick to boot and load applications, although not as fast as it might have been with an SSD.

For standard day to day use, the system worked flawlessly loading up web browsers or office productivity applications. For less than business uses, the system was great at playing HD movies, streaming HD video, and even the occasional game or two while the boss isn’t looking. The NVS 3100M graphics card can handle itself well with consumer 3D applications, even though its focus is on business uses. For users who don’t need a dedicated graphics card, or don’t need the highest performance, it would be suggested to just go with Intel GMA HD integrated graphics for best battery life.

wPrime processor comparison results (lower scores mean better performance):

PCMark05 measures overall system performance (higher scores mean better performance):

 

PCMark Vantage measures overall system performance (higher scores mean better performance):

3DMark06 measures overall graphics performance for gaming (higher scores mean better performance):

CrystalDiskMark storage drive performance test:

Heat and Noise
The Dell Latitude E6410 handled itself pretty well under stress, keeping heavy-contact areas like the palmrest and touchpad reasonable under heavy loads. At its peak, after a heavy run of benchmarks, we recorded a temperature of 96F on the bottom of the notebook. Fan noise during our tests stayed at reasonable levels, with the fan staying off or at a very low speed under a low load, and just above a whisper under a heavy load.

Battery Life
Dell was kind enough to include a higher-capacity 9-cell battery with our review unit, with the standard being a 60Wh 6-cell battery. We were pretty happy with our results, given the higher-end processor and graphics card configuration. With the screen brightness reduced to 70%, wireless on and refreshing a webpage every 60 seconds, and Windows set to the Balanced profile, the Latitude E6410 stayed on for 7 hours and 2 minutes. During the test we measured an average power consumption rate between 10-12 watts.

Conclusion
The Dell Latitude E6410 carries over the same look and feel as the E6400 before it, but it sticks to its roots by going back to the older gunmetal color seen on the D620 and D630 notebooks. Performance wise the Intel Core i7 processor and NVIDIA NVS 3100M graphics performed very well, handling everything that would be expected of a higher-end business notebook.

Build quality is fantastic with metal covers on top and bottom. Users looking to tinker with the insides will be happy to see a very user-friendly access cover, needing only one screw removed to open it up. Overall compared to the HP EliteBook 8440w and Lenovo ThinkPad T410, the Latitude E6410 holds its own and performs quite well. If you are cross shopping between models, it’s hard not to recommend taking a peak at the Latitude E6410 and see if it fits your needs and budget.

Pros:

  • Good looks and great build quality
  • Super easy to upgrade
  • Good battery life

Cons:

  • ALPS touchpad hiccups
  • Lackluster screen contrast ratio
Sours: http://www.notebookreview.com/notebookreview/dell-latitude-e6410-review/

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First we cleaned up, washed the dishes. Then we decided to drink some more wine. We turned on the music on the sly (its already over twelve). We decided to move a little before going to bed. We hugged each other.



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