Car seat laws idaho 2020

Car seat laws idaho 2020 DEFAULT

In the state of Idaho, it is a requirement that all children under the age of 13 ride in the back seat of the vehicle and every child must have either a car seat or a seatbelt, depending on his or her age and size. Many of the recommendations made in Idaho car seat laws are basic guidelines to follow and they essentially ask that all parents follow the exact instructions that come with the car seats they’ve purchased and keep children in those seats for as long as possible.

The state also recommends that parents use only brand-new car seats and never purchase them used because many older car seats simply don’t fit the state requirements and might therefore be unsafe to use. If you need your car seat inspected before using it, you can do so for free at various locations throughout the state, which are listed here.

Buying a new car seat and making sure that you obey all of the instructions that come along with it will keep your child safe every time that you get in the car, especially if you follow the basic recommendations listed below.

Laws for Rear-Facing Car Seats

As with more and more states nowadays, the state of Idaho is recommending that all children under two years of age be secured in DOT-approved car seats that face the rear of the vehicle. The car seat manufacturer itself will recommend how long you should keep the child in that seat but if you make sure that the child is rear-facing for two years, he or she will be much safer.

Naturally, if your child is heavier or taller than average, he or she may need to be put in a front-facing car seat before the two years are up. However, keeping your child in a rear-facing car seat as long as possible is highly recommended. The American Academy of Pediatrics recently made this recommendation and it is being applied to more and more states every year.

Laws for Front-Facing Car Seats

Once your child reaches the height and weight recommended by the car seat’s manufacturer, you can place him or her in a front-facing car seat. As a general rule, children should remain in a front-facing car seat until they are roughly four years old and weigh 40 to 65 pounds. In addition, the top tether of the car seat should be utilized.

Once again, if your child is heavy or tall for his or her age, you may be able to switch to a booster seat at this point but you still need to pay attention to the heights and weights recommended by the manufacturer of the car seat that you’re using. This is the surest way to make sure that your child is always safe.

Laws for Booster Seats

Once children reach four years of age, they are likely ready for booster seats. These seats come in two main types: a high-back booster seat, which should always be used if your vehicle has no headrests; and a backless booster seat, which should only be used if your vehicle has an appropriate headrest. Both of these booster seats need to be secured with a lap and shoulder belt, never just a lap belt.

In addition, booster seats need to be used until your child reaches a height of 4’9”, which is usually around age eight. If your child is not fully secured when buckled into the booster seat, you may have to switch back to a forward-facing car seat for a bit longer.

Height and Weight Requirements

All height and weight recommendations listed in the owner’s manual provided by the car seat manufacturer should be utilized so that the child is safe for as long as possible. There are very few actual height and weight requirements in the state of Idaho except for the following:

  • Front-facing car seat until the child reaches 40 pounds
  • Booster seat until the child reaches 4’9”
  • Standard seatbelt once the child reaches 4’9”, which includes making sure that it is being used properly

When determining the “do”s and “don’t”s regarding car seat laws in Idaho, using common sense is usually enough to keep your children safe. If you have a newer car seat and you’re following all of the height and weight recommendations listed by the manufacturer, your children will be safe for many years to come.

Laws for Seatbelts

Once children reach 4’9”, they can be secured with just standard seatbelts. Again, those under 13 should be kept in the back seat of the vehicle at all times. If you’re curious if your child is ready to get rid of the booster seat and move onto a regular seatbelt, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Can my child sit back against the seat back of the vehicle?
  • Do my child’s feet touch the floor?
  • Do my child’s legs fit comfortably over the seat and are his or her knees bent over the edge of the seat?
  • Can my child sit in this position during the entire trip?

There are times when going back to a booster seat is the best course of action for your child so if you’ve answered “no” to any of these questions, this is exactly what you may need to do.

Car seatbelts should also fit properly in order to be effective, which means the lap belt should lie across the upper thighs and the shoulder belt should fit snugly across the chest. In addition, the state of Idaho requires that everyone who is driving or riding in a moving vehicle be secured by either car seats or seatbelts every time.

Idaho is a primary seatbelt law state, which means that the authorities can stop you and give you a ticket just because you aren’t wearing a seatbelt, which applies to all adults in the vehicle. If they stop you for something else, they can then fine you if there are passengers under the age of 18 who are not wearing seatbelts. The fine for the first offense starts at $10 and goes up from there. The laws also apply to any person driving or riding in any seat in the vehicle.

Categories Car Seat LawsSours: https://babysafetylab.com/idaho-car-seat-laws/

Idaho Child Passenger Safety Programs and Partners

1. Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Pocket Card

To provide parents and caregivers basic recommendations on the basic child restraint system, the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) created a Pocket Card. This features different restraint types and positions based on the child's age, weight, and height.

The Pocket Card is free. Click here for more information.

2. The "We Have A Little Emergency" Program

The WHALE Program is a helpful tool to help identify children involved in vehicle crashes. This will give a child instant identification in a car safety seat if an adult companion is injured or unable to talk. 

The WHALE Kit includes the following:

  • An Identification Card
    This contains the photograph of a child and other vital information such as the child's name, date of birth, pertinent medical condition, and contact person in case of emergency.
  • WHALE Seat Stickers
    It includes two stickers featuring a WHALE logo, which should be attached to each side of the safety seat.
  • WHALE Window Stickers
    It includes two stickers featuring a WHALE logo, which should be attached to the lower rear corner of the vehicle's windows.

Be sure to enroll children in the WHALE Program. Contact the Idaho Department of Highway Safety for more information.

3. St. Luke's Children's Car Seat Program

Car seats are often overlooked as they cost hundreds to thousands of dollars. Good thing, the St. Luke's Children's Car Seat Program aims to provide various sized car seats to those in need by decreasing certain costs.

For a more affordable car seat, inquire at St. Luke's Children's Car Seat Program. 

4. Child Safety Seat Check Sites

To ensure that the child's safety seat is in good condition, have it checked and re-checked by a trained professional. With the Car Seat Inspection, there is a higher chance of escaping injury in the event of a crash. 

If there are no available sites, click here to ask for help.

Sours: https://wwwbucklup.org/car-seat-laws/idaho/
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Crash Records & Statistics

Crash Data and Statistical Information &#; Thousands of crashes happen each year on Idaho roads. Collection and analysis of crash reports is a crucial function of the Office of Highway Safety (OHS) to help make data-driven decisions that affect Idaho’s transportation system and the people who use it.

A Vehicle Crash Report (VCR) is filled out for every crash that involves a motor vehicle, occurs on public property and results in more than $ ($ before January 1, ) property damage for any one person involved in the crash, or results in an injury to any person involved. Law enforcement officers who respond to crashes identify a number of factors that contributed to the crash. These factors encompass all three aspects of the crash: environment (including location and road conditions), vehicle, and person information.

Once a crash report is completed, the responding law enforcement agency transmits the information to OHS electronically where the report is reviewed by a crash analyst. The crash analyst then checks the report for accuracy before entering the information into Idaho’s crash database.

Idaho Crash Data Map

Click for Crash Data Map

Data Access &#; Accessing and understanding data is an important part of making safe choices. In an effort to help educate the public, the Office of Highway Safety makes its crash data publicly available, online and in print. For FULL screen view, click this Crash Map Link


Crash Report Data Educational video
ITD Crash Data Dashboards

The ITD Crash Data Dashboards are an online resource showing crash trends and data. The dashboard contains a series of dynamic charts, graphs, and maps. The dashboard allows users to apply their own filters to crash data for custom searches.

The OHS publishes the Traffic Crash Report for Idaho. This report tabulates, analyzes and summarizes the various aspects of traffic collisions. The report is divided into sections to better facilitate searches for specific information.


Crash Report Requests

Crash records are considered public information, and as such, are available to the general public. In accordance with Idaho Code, the Office of Highway Safety (OHS) charges for each copy of a crash report, if applicable.

  • Requests for crash reports may be made Online through Access Idaho. The charge is $
  • Statistical information not contained in the annual Idaho Traffic Crash Reports can also be obtained through the OHS, other charges may apply.
  • Local and State agencies are able to analyze the crash data using WebCARS, a web-based analysis system developed by the OHS. For more information on Idaho’s crash reporting system eIMPACT or WebCARS, please email: [email protected]

Traffic Crash Report

Idaho Traffic Crashes (Entire report in PDF format)

Fatality Information by ITD District (Excel file)

Collision Report by Sections

  • Executive Summary and Crash Clock
  • Introduction, Explanation of Data, Glossary and References
  • General Collision Statistics (Crashes, People Killed & Injured, Rates, Costs, Contributing Circumstances)
  • Collisions by Roadway Classification
  • Collision Statistics by County and City (Population > 5, People)
  • Collisions by Time (Month, Day, Hour)
  • Driver Collision Statistics (Age, Gender, Violations, License Suspensions)
  • Collisions by Number of Units Involved (Single vs. Multiple Vehicle Crashes)
  • Impaired Driving
  • Safety Restraints
  • Aggressive Driving
  • Distracted Driving
  • Youthful Drivers (Age ) &#; Additional info under &#;Driver Collision Statistics&#;
  • Emergency Medical Services
  • Pedestrians, Bicyclists & Motorcycles
  • Commercial Motor Vehicles
  • Work Zone Collisions
  • Appendix A: Maps of Fatal Collision Locations
  • Appendix B: Map of Wild Animal Crashes
  • Appendix C: State Highway Information
  • Appendix D: 5-Year Collision Information
  • Appendix E: Year History &#; Fatalities & Fatality Rate

Traffic Crash Report

Idaho Traffic Crashes (Entire report in PDF format)

Fatality Information by ITD District (Excel file)

Collision Report by Sections

  • Executive Summary and Crash Clock
  • Introduction, Explanation of Data, Glossary and References
  • General Collision Statistics (Crashes, People Killed & Injured, Rates, Costs, Contributing Circumstances)
  • Collisions by Roadway Classification
  • Collision Statistics by County and City (Population > 5, People)
  • Collisions by Time (Month, Day, Hour)
  • Driver Collision Statistics (Age, Gender, Violations, License Suspensions)
  • Collisions by Number of Units Involved (Single vs. Multiple Vehicle Crashes)
  • Impaired Driving
  • Safety Restraints
  • Aggressive Driving
  • Distracted Driving
  • Youthful Drivers (Age ) &#; Additional info under &#;Driver Collision Statistics&#;
  • Emergency Medical Services
  • Pedestrians, Bicyclists & Motorcycles
  • Commercial Motor Vehicles
  • Work Zone Collisions
  • Appendix A: Maps of Fatal Collision Locations
  • Appendix B: Map of Wild Animal Crashes
  • Appendix C: State Highway Information
  • Appendix D: 5-Year Collision Information
  • Appendix E: Year History &#; Fatalities & Fatality Rate

Traffic Crash Report

Idaho Traffic Crashes (Entire report in PDF format)

Fatality Information by ITD District (Excel file)

Collision Report by Sections

  • Executive Summary and Crash Clock
  • Introduction, Explanation of Data, Glossary and References
  • General Collision Statistics (Crashes, People Killed & Injured, Rates, Costs, Contributing Circumstances)
  • Collisions by Roadway Classification
  • Collision Statistics by County and City (Population > 5, People)
  • Collisions by Time (Month, Day, Hour)
  • Driver Collision Statistics (Age, Gender, Violations, License Suspensions)
  • Collisions by Number of Units Involved (Single vs. Multiple Vehicle Crashes)
  • Impaired Driving
  • Safety Restraints
  • Aggressive Driving
  • Distracted Driving
  • Youthful Drivers (Age ) &#; Additional info under &#;Driver Collision Statistics&#;
  • Emergency Medical Services
  • Pedestrians, Bicyclists & Motorcycles
  • Commercial Motor Vehicles
  • Work Zone Collisions
  • Appendix A: Maps of Fatal Collision Locations
  • Appendix B: Map of Wild Animal Crashes
  • Appendix C: State Highway Information
  • Appendix D: 5-Year Collision Information
  • Appendix E: Year History &#; Fatalities & Fatality Rate

Traffic Crash Report

Idaho Traffic Crashes (Entire report in PDF format)

Fatality Information by ITD District (Excel file)

Collision Report by Sections

  • Executive Summary and Crash Clock
  • Introduction, Explanation of Data, Glossary and References
  • General Collision Statistics (Crashes, People Killed & Injured, Rates, Costs, Contributing Circumstances)
  • Collisions by Roadway Classification
  • Collision Statistics by County and City (Population > 5, People)
  • Collisions by Time (Month, Day, Hour)
  • Driver Collision Statistics (Age, Gender, Violations, License Suspensions)
  • Collisions by Number of Units Involved (Single vs. Multiple Vehicle Crashes)
  • Impaired Driving
  • Safety Restraints
  • Aggressive Driving
  • Distracted Driving
  • Youthful Drivers (Age ) &#; Additional info under &#;Driver Collision Statistics&#;
  • Emergency Medical Services
  • Pedestrians, Bicyclists & Motorcycles
  • Commercial Motor Vehicles
  • Work Zone Collisions
  • Appendix A: Maps of Fatal Collision Locations
  • Appendix B: Map of Wild Animal Crashes
  • Appendix C: State Highway Information
  • Appendix D: 5-Year Collision Information
  • Appendix E: Year History &#; Fatalities & Fatality Rate

Traffic Crash Report

Idaho Traffic Crashes (Entire report in PDF format)

Fatality Information by ITD District (Excel file)

Collision Report by Sections

  • Executive Summary and Crash Clock
  • Introduction, Explanation of Data, Glossary and References
  • General Collision Statistics (Crashes, People Killed & Injured, Rates, Costs, Contributing Circumstances)
  • Collisions by Roadway Classification
  • Collision Statistics by County and City (Population > 5, People)
  • Collisions by Time (Month, Day, Hour)
  • Driver Collision Statistics (Age, Gender, Violations, License Suspensions)
  • Collisions by Number of Units Involved (Single vs. Multiple Vehicle Crashes)
  • Impaired Driving
  • Safety Restraints
  • Aggressive Driving
  • Distracted Driving
  • Youthful Drivers (Age ) &#; Additional info under &#;Driver Collision Statistics&#;
  • Emergency Medical Services
  • Pedestrians, Bicyclists & Motorcycles
  • Commercial Motor Vehicles
  • Work Zone Collisions
  • Appendix A: Maps of Fatal Collision Locations
  • Appendix B: Map of Wild Animal Crashes
  • Appendix C: State Highway Information
  • Appendix D: 5-Year Collision Information
  • Appendix E: Year History &#; Fatalities & Fatality Rate

News

Child Safety Seat

Child Safety Information

Carma McKinnon is the statewide Child Passenger Safety Centralized Leadership coordinator. Carma works for the Lemhi County Sheriff&#;s Office in Salmon. If you need assistance regarding child passenger safety, don&#;t hesitate to contact Carma at () or [email protected].

Child Restraint RECOMMENDATIONS by Age and Size

Rear Facing Seat

  • To 2 years of age, or until the highest weight and height limit allowed by the car seat manufacturer.

Forward Facing Seat

  • To upper height and weight limits of car seat, approximately 4 years and pounds.
  • The top tether should be used until child weighs 40 pounds.

Booster Seat

  • From approximately 4 to at least 8 years old or 4’9”
  • Use a high back or backless belt positioning booster
  • Lap-belt only seating positions should not be used with booster seat

Adult Seat Belt

  • Age 8 or older and at least 4’9”
  • Lap belt lays across upper thighs and shoulder belt across chest; knees bend at seat edge

Car Seat Recommendations: Choosing the Right Seat

Child Restraint Basics &#; Pocket Card
The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) created a pocket card which provides child restraint basic recommendations to parents and caregivers. The card features restraint types and positions based on a child’s height, weight and age. The card is free.

If you would like a card mailed to you, please contact:

Tabitha Smith, Occupant Protection Program
ITD Office of Highway Safety
Phone:
[email protected]

Child Seat

Four Key Child Safety Steps

  • Restrain children on every trip, every time.
  • Keep children in the back seat until age
  • Use the correct safety seat for child’s size.
  • Use child safety seats and seat belts correctly.

Important Details for Your Child&#;s Safety Seat

Child Safety Seat Ratings
The purpose of NHTSA’s ease of use rating program is to educate parents and caregivers about child safety seat features and which are easy to use.

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Car Seat Registration
One of the most important goals for child passenger safety is to make sure that car seats and boosters meet all Federal Safety Standards. If it is determined that a car seat or booster doesn’t comply with the required safety standards, a recall may occur so that the manufacturer can fix the problem. Registering your seat makes sense because it gives the manufacturer the ability to contact you about recalls and safety notices.

Used Child Safety Seats
Don’t buy or sell used car seats. Although it is nice to share and reuse baby items, car seats are one product that shouldn’t be reused. The components used in the typical car seat deteriorate and weaken over time. Car seats have an expiration date stamped on the back of the seat; the expiration date is typically six years from the seat’s manufacture date. Click here for details on retiring a car seat.

The above information provided courtesy of consumer reports &#; Consumer Reports is published by Consumers Union. Both Consumer Reports and Consumers Union are not-for-profit organizations that accept no advertising. Neither has any commercial relationship with any advertiser or sponsor on this site.

Child Safety Seat Check Sites

Child Seat

Once you are on the website link below, begin by clicking on the “Enter Location” search box. Start your search by entering the state, zip code or enter a city &#; state (example, Rexburg Idaho). If you enter a city &#; state or zip code, the website will provide car seat check sites within 25 miles. If no sites are available, contact Carma McKinnon at [email protected] or

It is important to read and clearly understand all safety and booster seat installation and use instructions. Having your child safety seat initially checked and re-checked often by a trained professional increases your child’s chances of escaping injury in the event of a car crash.

Become a Car Seat Technician

Become a Technician

Child Passenger Safety Technicians train properly fit child safety seats. Out of the thousands of child safety seats installed in vehicles over 80% of them are incorrectly installed according to National surveys conducted by NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration). The NHTSA Standardized Child Passenger Safety Training course is designed to certify child safety advocates as Child Passenger Safety Technicians. The course provides attendee&#;s with the knowledge and skills necessary to provide parents with accurate and consistent information regarding child car safety seats.

The Idaho Office of Traffic and Highway Safety recommends that anyone providing parent technical information regarding their child&#;s car seat should attend this valuable training course. The Idaho CPS program provides free Child Passenger Safety Inspection Stations through our hospitals, fire departments, police departments, and District Public Health Department offices. At these locations parents and caregivers can learn how to safely transport children by using the properly fitted child safety seats. Click here for a list of current child safety seat check sites in Idaho, then enter Idaho and the zip code.

If you wish to take this course, you must register online at the National SAFE KIDS. This site describes policies and administrative requirements for course registration and certification for the National Standardized Child Passenger Safety Training Program. For those contemplating taking the course, please keep in mind that this is not an easy course and is physically exerting. It is a full 3 or 4 day course with a child safety seat check, hands on skills and Checks for Understanding that must be passed. It also requires the physical ability to climb in and out of cars, placing pressure on car seats to install them properly. It is not recommended for persons with back problems to take this course. To register you will need to be prepared to use a credit card to charge your registration fee of $ This registration fee includes your manual and your 2-year NHTSA National Child Passenger Safety Certification. To remain current CPS technicians must recertify every 2 years.

If you have questions after you have read this page, or for details regarding course availability in Idaho, contact Carma McKinnon at () or [email protected]

The WHALE Program - In Case of an Emergency


Emergency service personnel across Idaho have a tool available to help identify small children involved in motor vehicle crashes. The WHALE program &#;We Have A Little Emergency&#; gives instant identification of a child in a car safety seat in the event that an adult in the car is injured and unable to talk.

The WHALE identification card provides emergency personnel information to identify young children involved in a crash. Sometimes just knowing a child&#;s name can help rescue workers comfort young patients. Rescue workers can refer to an identification card attached to the safety seat and find the child&#;s name, medical information and who to contact in case of emergency. Stickers affixed to car windows and the safety seat also alert emergency workers that the child&#;s information is close at hand.

The WHALE Kit includes:

  • An Identification Card — containing a space for a photograph of the child, and important information about the child in the safety seat, such as the child&#;s name, date of birth, pertinent medical information, and whom to contact in an emergency.
  • Two WHALE (seat) Stickers — the WHALE logo, to be attached to each side of the child safety seat.
  • Two WHALE (window) Stickers — featuring the WHALE logo, to be attached to the lower rear corner of the vehicle&#;s windows.

For more information on distribution points or to get a WHALE Kit in English or Spanish, please contact:

Tabitha Smith, Occupant Protection Program
ITD Office of Highway Safety
Phone:
[email protected]

Car Seat Law and Useful Links

Idaho&#;s Child Restraint Law

Idaho’s child passenger safety law requires all children 6 years of age or younger be properly restrained in an appropriate child safety restraint. This is a primary law, and current infraction penalties and fees may be reviewed on the Idaho Supreme Court’s website Infraction Penalty Schedule.

Child Passenger Safety Laws in Other States
If you happen to be travelling in other states, please be aware that other state laws differ from Idaho’s. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands and the Virgin Islands require child safety seats for infants and children fitting specific criteria. Click here for other states’ laws pertaining to child passenger safety.

Partners for Child Passenger Safety

Tabitha Smith, Occupant Protection Program
ITD Office of Highway Safety
Phone:
[email protected]

Aggressive Driving

Aggressive Driving
Aggressive driving is a high-risk behavior. High-risk drivers climb into the anonymity of an automobile and take out their frustrations on anybody at any time. For them, frustration levels are high, and level of concern for fellow motorists is low. Most people believe that the worst thing that can happen if they speed or fail to obey traffic signals is that they will get a ticket, so it&#;s an acceptable risk. Drivers like this are wrong. Maybe even dead wrong, because aggressive driving can kill.


For more information on aggressive driving, visit shift-idaho.org/aggressive-driving


You are an aggressive driver if you:

  • Ignore traffic signals
  • Speed and tailgate
  • Drive too fast for conditions
  • Weave in and out of traffic
  • Make improper lane changes frequently and abruptly
  • Pass on the shoulder
  • Make hand and facial gestures
  • Scream, honk and flash lights

If confronted by an aggressive driver, you should:

  • Get out of their way as soon as you can safely
  • Stay calm &#; reaching your destination safely is your goal
  • Do not challenge them
  • Avoid eye contact
  • Ignore gestures and don&#;t return them
  • Report aggressive driving (vehicle description, license number, location)
  • Always buckle up in case abrupt movements cause you to lose control of your vehicle
  • If it leads to deliberate acts of violence this is Road Rage, which is a criminal act

Report Aggressive Drivers:

Road Rage:

Road rage is a serious offense, and occurrences are becoming more common. Road rage is defined as a deliberate, violent act against another driver and is a criminal offense.

For more information about Aggressive Driving education and safety awareness efforts in Idaho please contact:

Josephine Middleton | Email: [email protected]

Distracted Driving

HS_no_phone

Distraction is defined by NHTSA as a specific type of inattention that occurs when drivers divert their attention away from the task of driving to focus on another activity instead. These distractions can be electronic distractions, such as navigation systems and cell phones, or more conventional distractions, such as interacting with passengers and eating. These distracting tasks can affect drivers in different ways and are categorized into the following three types:

  • Visual &#; taking your eyes off the road;
  • Manual &#; taking your hands off the wheel; and
  • Cognitive &#; taking your mind off the road.

For more information visit shift-idaho.org


Research conducted by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute (VTTI) in reported that, &#;Nearly 80% of crashes and 65% of near-crashes involved some form of driver inattention within three seconds before the event. The primary cause of driver inattention in this major study included such distracting activities as cell phone use and factors that significantly increase risk such as reaching for a moving object (a 9 times greater risk) and drowsiness (4 times greater).&#; Distracted driving caused by the use of a cell phone or any other electronic device to make a phone call, text a message, read email messages, manipulate music files or search for direction information is an ever growing concern.

Distracted Driving is a focus area in the Idaho Transportation Department&#;s Strategic Highway Safety Plan.

Seat Belts

Buckle Up, Idaho Campaign | Rules to LVE By

 

Idaho&#;s Safety Restraint Issue

  • From to , people killed (age 7 &#; up) were not wearing seat belts.
    • Also, 13 children killed (age 6 &#; under) were unrestrained.
  • Unrestrained Fatal and Serious Injury Crash Summary |
  • 82% of unrestrained fatalities happened on rural roads.

Idaho’s observed safety restraint use rate was 85% in

 

Idaho&#;s Seat Belt Law

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Idaho&#;s Seat Belt Law: Idaho Code

Idaho law requires everyone in a vehicle to wear safety restraints. Other provisions under the law include:

  • Adult violators, 18 and older, are subject to a $10 citation.
  • An adult driver is ticketed for passengers younger than 18 who are not properly restrained.
  • If the driver is younger than 18 and the driver or any occupant younger than 18 fails to wear a seat belt, court costs are added to the fine. Current infraction penalties and fees may be reviewed on the Idaho Supreme Court’s website, specific link: Infraction Penalty Schedule
  • A law enforcement officer can issue a citation solely for a safety restraint violation, but there must be another violation leading to the traffic stop.

Seat Belt Surveys

The Office of Highway Safety conducts observational seat belt surveys every year. The surveys are conducted at sites throughout the state. The surveys are used to estimate seat belt usage throughout the state. Blank pages have been removed from the documents.

Youth Education

The Office of Highway Safety produces educational materials which are available at no cost to qualified organizations for distribution to the general public. Typically, the materials are made available to law enforcement agencies, government and non-profit organizations.

Teen Driving

Young Driver Education

Serious and, often times, fatal crashes are the result of distracted driving. Anytime you take your eyes off the road, your hands off the steering wheel, and/or take your mind off driving, you become a distracted driver.

Resist the urge to text, talk on a cell phone, eat or drink while driving.

Resource

What are Local Teens Doing?
Youth all over the state are doing wonderful things to get the word out about distracted driving. Did your school create a message to teens about the dangers of texting and driving or distracted driving. If so, tell us about it. We&#;d love to share it with other teens around the state. Send us a link to your YouTube video, the PSA, or a .jpg of the artwork to: [email protected]

Safety Programs & Funding

Description of Programs

The Office of Highway Safety (OHS) administers the Federal Highway Safety Programs, which currently are funded by formula through the Fixing America&#;s Surface Transportation Act (FAST-ACT) and the Highway Safety Act of The goal of the program is to eliminate deaths and serious injuries resulting from motor vehicle crashes by implementing programs designed to address driver behaviors. The purpose of the program is to provide funding at the state and community level for a highway safety program that addresses Idaho&#;s own unique circumstances and particular highway safety needs.

Grant Application

Application Timeline for Grants

  • January 11, &#; Request for Applications Released
  • February 26, &#; Grant Application due to OHS by February 26,
  • March &#; OHS Staff review applications and submit them for scoring
  • April &#; OHS presents the Highway Safety Plan (HSP) to the ITSC Board for approval
    • Included in this plan are the potential grant awards
  • June &#; ITD Board review and approval of the HSP July &#; NHTSA review and approval the HSP
  • August &#; New grants to be awarded and subgrantees notified
  • October &#; Grant-funded activities may begin

Traffic Enforcement Mobilization Agreement (TEMA)

The Office of Highway Safety offers law enforcement agencies throughout the state the opportunity to participate in Traffic Enforcement Mobilizations (saturation patrols), which support enforcement efforts by agencies to reduce deaths, serious injuries and economic loss as part of the Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP). Dedicated enhanced enforcement efforts and /or traffic enforcement equipment for regular duty dedicated mobilization enforcement are funded for hours worked during the mobilizations. Participation in the mobilization is initiated by a Traffic Enforcement Mobilization Agreement (TEMA) between the agency and the Idaho Transportation Department Office of Highway Safety.

Traffic Enforcement Mobilization agreements, claims and reporting are now online. Each law enforcement agency that intends to participate in and apply for the Traffic Enforcement Mobilization Program must first receive the proper login and password. Each user requires a unique login and password. To request your login and password email Michael Seals [email protected]

Traffic Safety Problem Identification

A &#;traffic safety problem&#; is an identifiable subgroup of drivers, pedestrians, vehicles, or roadways that is statistically higher in collision experience than normal expectations. Problem identification involves the study of relationships between collisions and the population, licensed drivers, registered vehicles, and vehicle miles traveled, as well as characteristics of specific subgroups that may contribute to collisions.

The process used to identify traffic safety problems began initially by evaluating Idaho&#;s experience in each of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration&#;s (NHTSA&#;s) eight highway safety priority areas. These were program areas determined by NHTSA to be most effective in reducing motor vehicle collisions, injuries and deaths. Consideration for other potential traffic safety problem areas came from analyzing Idaho collision data, suggestions from Idaho Traffic Safety Commission (ITSC) members, suggestions by Office of Highway Safety staff, and by researching issues identified by other states. All traffic safety problems must be validated with supporting data and there must be an effective countermeasure to address the problem that is eligible for Federal highway safety funds.

The traffic safety problem areas that have been identified and are currently being addressed are: Aggressive Driving, Occupant Protection, Impaired Driving, Distracted Driving, Youthful Drivers, Pedestrian Safety, Bicycle Safety, Motorcycle Safety, Traffic Records, and Emergency Medical Services.

Highway Safety Plans and Annual Reports

In order to receive the Federal highway safety funding, each State must submit a High Safety Plan, which includes a description of the processes used by the State to identify its highway safety problems, define its highway safety performance measures, set goals for those performance measures, and develop projects and activities to address its problems and achieve its goals. The Plan, approved by the Governor&#;s Representative for Highway Safety, must also include descriptions of the projects and activities the State plans to implement and link the countermeasure strategies and projects to the goals identified in the Plan.

Each State is also required to submit an Annual Report within 90 days of the end of the Federal Fiscal Year which evaluates the State&#;s progress in meeting its highway safety goals, using performance measures identified in the Highway Safety Plan and describes how the projects and activities funded during the fiscal year contributed to meeting the State&#;s highway safety goals.

Strategic Highway Safety Plan

Strategic Highway Safety PlanStrategic Highway Safety Plan Cover

Vision: Continue to move Toward Zero Deaths on all roadways in Idaho.
Mission: Provide the safest transportation system possible.

Primary Goal by (based on a five-year average)

  • Reduce the number of traffic deaths to or fewer.

Secondary Goals by (based on a five-year average)

  • Reduce the fatality rate to per million annual vehicle miles traveled.
  • Reduce the number of serious injuries to 1, or fewer.
  • Reduce the serious injury rate to per annual vehicle miles traveled.

FFY Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP)

Strategic Highway Safety Plan Cover
The SHSP is a clear, concise document that helps coordinate goals and highway safety programs across the state. The collaborative process of developing and implementing the SHSP helps Idaho’s safety partners work together in education, enforcement, engineering, emergency response and policy to help reduce fatalities and serious injuries on Idaho roadways.

Planning into Action &#; The SHSP also articulates priorities that have been established by a diversity of safety stakeholders, thereby helping to assure these priorities represent the shared interests of multiple partners and enhancing their likelihood of successful funding.

Federal Highway Administration: Strategic Highway Safety Plan Community of Practice

Forms and Resources

Contacts

Buckled Up

Office of Highway Safety (OHS)

Who We Are

Our Responsibilities: The primary responsibilities of the Office of Highway Safety are housing and maintaining the Statewide Collision Database, analyzing and disseminating collision statistics, and administering the federal section highway safety funds.

Where we are located: The Office of Highway Safety is located in Boise, Idaho at the Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) headquarters complex. The Office of Highway Safety is located in the East Annex building.

The physical address is: W. State Street, Boise, ID

The mailing address is: Idaho Transportation Department-Office of Highway Safety | PO Box Boise, ID

Phone: () | Fax: ()

How we fit in: The Office of Highway Safety is under the Division of Engineering Products and Plans (DEPP) of the Idaho Transportation Department and works closely with other Department sections and districts to promote safe driving behaviors and improve the safety of roadways on the state highway system.

The Director of the Idaho Transportation Department serves as the Governors highway safety representative. The Office of Highway Safety is managed by the Highway Safety Manager. The Office of Highway Safety consists of two teams: the records team and the programs team. The records team is responsible for maintaining, updating, and ensuring the quality of the statewide motor vehicle crash database. The program team is responsible for administering Idaho&#;s Federal highway safety funds and analyzing and disseminating the crash data. All funding is subject to approval by the Idaho Traffic Safety Commission and the Idaho Transportation Board.

Office of Highway Safety Staff

You can reach the Highway Safety section at () or FAX () , or directly contact the staff below.

Programs Team:

  • Lisa Losness, Grants Contracts Officer for Impaired Driving, Vulnerable Users (Youth) & Highway Safety Planning
  • Josephine Middleton, Grants Contracts Officer for Distracted Driving, Police Traffic Services, Mobilizations, Equipment & Mini Grants
  • Bill Kotowski, Grants Contracts Officer for Community Traffic Safety (Law Enforcement Liaisons, Coalition, Summit) & Public Outreach
  • Tabitha Smith, Grants Contracts Officer for Motorcycles, Alive at 25, Occupant Protection & Child Passenger Safety
  • Denise Dinnauer, Grants Contracts Officer for Year-long Grants, Vulnerable Users (Bicycle & Pedestrian), Compliance & Training

Records Team & Data Analysis:

  • Steve Rich, Research Analyst Principal Behavioral Data Analysis & Dissemination
  • Kelly Campbell, Research Analyst Principal Location Data Analysis & Dissemination, Safety Evaluations, HAL Program, Traffic Records, SWET
  • Kirstin Weldin, Law Enforcement Trainer | E-mail: [email protected]
  • Carrie Akers, FARS Analyst | E-mail: [email protected]
  • Patti Fanckboner, Crash Data Records Specialist | E-mail: [email protected]
  • Julie Whistler, Crash Data Records Specialist | E-mail: [email protected]
  • Leslie De La Cruz, Crash Data Records Specialist | E-mail: [email protected]
  • Taylor Ellis, Crash Data Records Specialist | E-mail: [email protected]

Mission

Mission Statement: We support the Department’s mission of ”Your Safety. Your Mobility. Your Economic Opportunity” by conducting programs to eliminate traffic deaths, serious injuries, and economic losses through funding programs and activities that promote safe travel on Idaho’s transportation systems, and collecting and maintaining crash data and utilizing reliable crash statistics.

Vision Statement: To be the best in the country in promoting safety on Idaho&#;s roads in an efficient and effective manner.

Operating Philosophy: The Office of Highway Safety has a deep concern for the welfare of the traveling public, and believe our main purpose is to save lives through creative, highly visible, innovative, and effective highway safety programs for all modes of transportation. We are committed to our critical role within the State of Idaho, and the rest of the nation, to ensure safe travel on Idaho’s roadways. As stewards, we have a responsibility to make a positive impact on peoples’ lives.

The continuation and expansion of state and local partnerships is essential to our success. The primary mission is to identify existing and emerging traffic safety trends through statistically-based problem identification efforts, to efficiently provide decision makers accurate data for use in determining where the most effective highway safety investment is made. This includes the task to develop and implement highway safety programs that save lives and prevent injuries, and to provide appropriate safety funds that empower communities to address critical local traffic safety issues.

As highway safety professionals, we are committed to teamwork, integrity and maintaining a positive working environment. In our highway safety partnerships, we respond, cooperate, and provide accurate and timely service. We are a leader in a coordinated statewide effort to eliminate death and serious injury on all of Idaho’s roadways.

Please send comments, questions and suggestions to: [email protected]

Or write to Idaho Transportation Department &#; Office of Highway Safety P.O. Box Boise, Idaho

Sours: https://itd.idaho.gov/safety/
Idaho Today: This week is National Child Passenger Safety Week

Idaho Car Seat Laws | Everything You Need To Know

Idaho car seat laws are put in place to keep your child safe when you are on the road. These laws are like what is found in many other states and will make sure your child does not get hurt during an accident. 

Idaho Car Seat LawsThe Idaho car seat laws require all children under the age of two, and below the maximum height and weight requirements, to use a rear-facing car seat. Children may then use a forward-facing car seat until they meet all maximum weight and height requirements as well. 

Once the child is at least 4, or 4’ 9” tall, they may move on to a booster seat. The child must wear a full shoulder and lap belt even when in the booster seat. All passengers in the vehicle must always wear a seat belt under Idaho car safety laws. 

Let us take a closer look at some of these car seat laws to help us understand how to better protect your children while driving in Idaho. 

Quick Navigation

Safety In Mind 

Idaho car seat laws follow many of the same outlines as the car seat laws in other states. The primary goal is to keep children safe when riding in the vehicle. All of the laws in place are meant to help meet this goal. 

Parents may choose to prolong any of these laws to help enhance the safety of their children. For example, many parents choose to keep their children rear-facing for longer than 2 years for optimal safety. 

Idaho Rear-Facing Car Seat Laws

Idaho car seat law requires all babies and toddlers need to ride in a rear-facing car seat while in the car. The child must remain in this car seat until they are two years old. 

The child may turn around when they reach the height and weight limit on the car seat. If the child does not reach this limit by the time, they are 2, they must remain rear-facing.

Some car seats will have higher weight and height limits than others. Check with your particular make and model to see what these are. Check to see what the rear-facing weight limit is if your car seat can be used as a forward-facing and a rear-facing car seat. 

If the child is still under the height and weight limit when they reach their second birthday, the decision is up to the parents. Parents may choose to keep their child rear-facing for longer. 

 Forward Facing Car Seat Laws In Idaho

Idaho car seat law allows children who reach the maximum height and weight requirements on the car seat to turn forward-facing. Once your child turns two, they may also face forward in the car. 

For smaller children, you may choose to wait longer before using a forward-facing car seat. Many parents choose to wait until their child reaches the maximum height and weight requirements on the car seat. 

Your child must stay in this forward-facing seat until they reach the maximum limits for weight and height. This will depend on the age and size of the child. Most forward-facing car seats are designed to hold up to 40 to 65 pounds. This generally keeps your child in the forward-facing car seat until they are at least four years old. 

Idaho Booster Law 

Idaho state law allows children who reach the maximum weight and height limits to move to a booster seat. 

Parents have many choices when they pick out a booster seat. Parents can choose between a booster seat with a back to add more support. As your child develops and grows, you can choose a booster without the back. 

Idaho car seat laws do require that a full shoulder and lap belt be used for children in booster seats. Never use just a lap belt with a booster seat in Idaho. 

Idaho car seat laws

What Are The Height And Weight Requirements For a Booster Seat?

The height requirement is 4&#;9&#;. Weight is going to vary based on the brand of the booster seat, but you can get an idea if your child is ready for a booster seat by using this online checker.

Older Than 8 Years Old

Idaho car seat laws state that children older than eight years old may ride in a vehicle without a booster seat. The child must also be at least 4’ 9”. 

The child must always wear a seat belt when the vehicle is in motion. This will help keep them safe. All passengers and drivers in the vehicle, regardless of age, must wear the seat belt. 

Children should remain in the back seat for as long as possible. The back seat is the safest place for your child. Idaho law does not state the exact age when children may begin sitting in the front seat. 

Parents may choose, for the safety of their child, to keep them in the booster seat for longer. Follow all recommendations and requirements on the car seat to enhance safety. 

Idaho Seat Belt Laws

Idaho driving laws do include seat belt laws. Because seat belts can save lives, the seat belt laws in Idaho make it illegal for passengers and drivers to travel without a seat belt. This is in place regardless of the age of the driver or passenger. 

All citizens in Idaho must wear their seat belts when the vehicle is moving. Adult violators 18 and older will receive a $10 citation if pulled over without wearing a seat belt. 

When can my child sit in the front seat in Idaho?

They can sit in the front seat when they&#;re 14 years old.

Idaho Car Seat Laws in Trucks

Idaho car seat laws require the same rules for car seats in trucks as they do in other vehicles. Children must still stay in the rear-facing and forward-facing car seats based on their height and weight limits. 

Try to keep all car seats away from active airbags to avoid injuries. Use the shoulder and lap belt on all children who will sit in a booster seat. 

It is always safest for your child to sit in the back seat if possible. If the child is going to ride in a truck, or all available spots in the back are taken by younger children, the oldest child may sit in the front. 

Exceptions to the laws

  • If all the seat belt positions in the vehicle are in use, then the child should be placed in the rear seat of the vehicle if it has one.
  • If the child is removed from the seat because the mother has to nurse them or attend to their other needs.

Penalties For Violating Car Seat Laws

If a child isn&#;t in a safety seat, the penalty is an $ fine. Subsequent violations carry a $ fine.

Buses, Taxis and Uber

Seat belts are not required on buses, however school bus drivers are required to get specific training. They have to have a CDL license, and two endorsements for it &#; one for driving a school bus, and another for driving a school bus with passengers. 

Car seats still need to be used when riding in taxis or Uber cars &#; if the taxi or Uber doesn’t already have one, the adult will need to supply one. 

Installing the Car Seat Properly

Idaho car seat laws require the car seat to be installed properly before use. This will help keep the child safe in case an accident occurs.

Always follow the instructions from the manufacturer on how to properly install your chosen car seat. This is the safest way to get the car seat put in well and safely. 

You can also test the car seat and make sure it stays in place. Try moving the car seat back and forth and up and down. If the car seat moves more than an inch in any direction, it is not securely in place. 

Previous Idaho Car Seat Law

Previous Idaho car seat laws required children to ride in rear-facing car seats from birth until at least age 1 or 20 pounds, front-facing or convertible car seats from age 1 to age 6 or 40 pounds, and to use a lap and shoulder belt from age 6 to

St. Luke’s Children’s Car Seat Program

Car seats are one of the most expensive items you&#;ll have to buy for your child, but luckily one hospital has a program to help. Idaho residents who want a free or reduced-price car seat can contact St. Luke&#;s Children&#;s Car Seat program at

Safe Kids Magic Valley Car Seat Program

You can also contact the Safe Kids Magic Valley Car Seat Program at St. Lukes at , or email them at [email protected] 

WHALE Program

If you have a small child, be sure to enroll them in the WHALE (We Have A Little Emergency) Program. This program provides a special identification card to children in case they’re involved in a crash. The card should be put on the seat. It allows rescue workers to find out the child’s name, plus the card has a photograph and the child’s information on it. 

The kit provided also includes stickers for parents to put on the car seat and the vehicle. Contact the Idaho Department of Highway Safety to get a kit or find out more information. 

If you choose to participate in this program, keep the following pointers in mind:

  • It’s a good idea to give WHALE information to other people who regularly drive your child. 
  • Make corrections to the card as information changes. 
  • Remove the information card from the seat if you sell it or give it away. 

Conclusion

The Idaho car seat laws are in place to help keep your child safe while on the road. It is important to follow them to not only avoid penalties and fees but to prevent any injuries. 

These car seat laws are minimums that parents should consider when they are transporting their children. It is always safer to prolong each phase depending on your child and their personal needs. 

When the car seat laws are used properly, everyone can be a little safer on the road. Any time you drive through Idaho, or if you live there, make sure to check out the car seat laws before you drive. 

Keren Simanova

Welcome to my car seat blog! As a mom of 3, I put together with other hard-working moms a highly informative one-stop car seat resource, full with many reviews and buyer guides. I hope you find it invaluable. Thank you for trusting me & my team! - Keren

Sours: https://carseatsmom.com/idaho-car-seat-laws/

Seat idaho car 2020 laws

According to Idaho State Law, until children are 8yrs old and at least 4’9, they must be secured in a proper rear-facing car seat, forward-facing car seat or booster seat depending on their age.

Go here for a list of the current top rated Rear-Facing Car Seats.

Every parent in Idaho must read this article. Below, we&#;ll go over everything you need to know about Idaho&#;s latest child seat safety laws and supply you with the online resources you need to keep your child safe. After reading through all this info, you&#;ll feel confident driving around the Gem State with your children.

Idaho car seat laws

  • Toddlers and babies must remain in a rear facing car seat until they&#;re 2 years old, or until they reach the the highest weight and height limit allowed by the car seat manufacturer.
  • After the rear facing car seat, children go on to a forward facing car seat. Children should stay in the forward facing seat until they reach the upper height and weight limits of car seat, which is generally 4 years old and pounds.
  • Then, children may use a booster seat. Be sure to NEVER use only a lap belt with a booster seat.

Additional resources

  • The top rated Rear-Facing Car Seats.
  • Free car seat installation inspections: Almost all fire departments, police stations and EMTs offer installation checks. For a complete list, visit the bottom of this page on the NHTSA&#;s website.
  • WHALE Window Stickers: The state of Idaho participates in a program called WHALE (&#;We Have A Little Emergency&#;) to help first responders identify children in safety seats in the event of an emergency. You can find out more information about getting a WHALE card for your child in this brochure.
  • Idaho Child Restrain Recommendations via Idaho Transportation Dept: Highway Safety
  • Idaho Statute Passenger Safety for Children
  • Idaho&#;s pricing for infractions and penalties: Infraction schedule
Sours: https://newcarseatlaws.com/idaho/
Keeping you kids safe in the car using booster seats with the Idaho Transportation Department

Car Seat Safety

Transporting Precious Cargo – Car Seat Safety

Did you know that nine out of ten car seats are used incorrectly? Whether you're expecting your first baby or have a car full of kids, correctly choosing and installing a child safety seat can be a challenge, especially with the variety of seats, vehicle belt systems, and vehicles on the market.

To keep your child as safe as possible, follow these tips and sign up for a car seat check-up with a certified technician at St. Luke’s. (See below for upcoming events.)

Rear-facing Car Seat

  • Rear-facing car seats are the safest car seat because the head, neck, and spine are better protected in the case of a collision.
  • Children should stay in a rear-facing seat as long as they fit the height and weight limits, at least until 2 years old.
  • If children start to grow out of the rear-facing seat before the age of 2, look for a different seat with higher height and weight requirements.

Forward-facing Car Seat

  • If your child is over 2 years old and has outgrown the height and weight requirements of their rear-facing car seat, they should move to a forward-facing car seat with a 5-point harness.
  • Children should stay in a car seat until they've outgrown the height and weight requirements and are mature enough to sit correctly in a booster seat.

Booster Seat

  • Booster seats raise your child high enough to use a seat belt. They're used when a child has outgrown harness-style car seats, but aren't big enough to use a seat belt.
  • Children can move into a booster seat when they outgrow their car seats and can stay seated without unbuckling.

Seat Belt

  • Kids shouldn't move to a seat belt until they're 4 feet, 9 inches tall, typically between 8 and 12 years old.
  • Children should ride in the back seat until they're at least 13 years old.
  • No one should ever ride in the back of a pickup truck.
  • Idaho law requires everyone riding in a motor vehicle to wear a seat belt.

Seat Belt Checklist

If your child can pass this 5-point checklist, he or she should be ready for a regular seat belt.

  • Can your child sit with his or her back flat against the car seat?
  • Do his or her knees bend at the edge of the seat with feet touching the floor?
  • Does the lap belt lie flat over the thighs, not the stomach?
  • Does the shoulder belt lie between the collarbone and shoulder?
  • Can he or she sit properly for the length of the trip without moving around or unbuckling?

Right Seat 4 Kids 4 Care Presented by St. Luke's Children's and Kohl's

St. Luke's Children's is Idaho's only children's hospital, serving children across six states. Child passenger safety is often an overlooked, affordable health care need, costing families hundreds to thousands of dollars. Our car seat program has the ability to help decrease certain costs to our community by providing various sized car seats to those in need.

If you have questions or find yourself in need of resources, please contact St. Luke's Children's Car Seat Program at ()

Car Seat Safety Checks

Let St. Luke’s help take the stress out of correctly installing a safety seat for your treasured cargo. We offer monthly car seat check-up events, and also provide child passenger safety seats for families who may not be able to afford them. At these events, a St. Luke's certified child passenger safety technician will evaluate your car seat for proper installation, use, and recall status, and answer any questions you may have regarding your child’s safety in the car.

Idaho Law

Idaho's Child Passenger Safety Law requires that all children six years of age or younger be properly restrained in an appropriate child safety restraint. Idaho Code is a primary law, with a fine of $

Sours: https://www.stlukesonline.org/health-services/health-information/health-topics/car-seat-safety

You will also like:

Idaho Car Seat Laws (): Current Laws &#; Safety Resources for Parents

Within the next 2 minutes, the time it will take you to read this article, almost 4 children would be involved in a car accident?

That’s right – according to the National Safety Council, one child gets into a vehicle accident every 33 seconds.

According to studies, a rear-facing seat is the safest place for the babies to be in. The state of Idaho, through Idaho Motor Vehicle law, wants to make sure that all the children on the road are traveling in a safe manner.

According to section of Idaho Motor Vehicle law:

“No noncommercial motor vehicle operator shall transport a child who is six (6) years of age or younger in a motor vehicle manufactured with seat belts after January 1, , unless the child is properly secured in a child safety restraint that meets the requirements of federal motor vehicle safety standard no. ”

There is a fine of $80 for violating this law.

Idaho Rear-facing Car Seat Law

The Idaho state law requires that toddlers and babies must remain in a rear-facing car seat until they are 2 years old, or until they reach the highest weight and height limit allowed by the car seat manufacturer.

Idaho Forward-facing Car Seat Law

After the age of 2 and pounds, children should travel in a forward-facing car seat until they reach the upper limit mentioned by the car seat manufacturer.

Child Booster Seat Laws in Idaho

Idaho Transportation department recommends that children from 4 to 8 years of age and under 4’9” should travel in a booster seat.

When Can My Child Sit in the Front Seat in Idaho?

In Idaho, there is currently no age limit for traveling in the front seat. Idaho Transportation Department and children safety experts recommend that your child can sit in the front seat when Lap belt lays across upper thighs, shoulder belt across chest, and knees bend at the seat edge. This usually happens around the age of

Leaving Child in Car Law in Idaho

Idaho doesn’t have any laws in place regarding leaving children in cars unattended.

Is it Illegal to Smoke in a Car with a Child in Idaho?

It is not illegal to smoke in a car with a child passenger.

Idaho Law Car Seat - Replacement After Accident

There are currently no guidelines in Idaho laws regarding seat replacement. NHTSA says that you don’t need to replace the car seat if the crash is minor.

Places to Get Car Seat Help in Idaho

Good Car Seat Videos for Idahoan Parents

How to Buckle a Child into a Car Seat with a 5-Point Harness

Understanding Seat Belt Systems

The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: Car Seat Safety by Age

Car Seat Safety

Lee Memorial Hospital Car Seat Safety

NHTSA’s Installing a Car Seat Properly Tutorial

Infants Car Seat Installation

Resources for More Info on Idaho Car Seat Safety

Sours: https://safeconvertiblecarseats.com/safety-resources/idaho-car-seat-laws/


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