Macbook pro 2012 ssd

Macbook pro 2012 ssd DEFAULT

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2012 Hard Drive Replacement

  • Remove the following ten screws:
    • Remove the following ten screws:

    • Three 14.4 mm Phillips #00 screws

    • Three 3.5 mm Phillips #00 screws

    • Four 3.5 mm shouldered Phillips #00 screws

    • When replacing the small screws, align them perpendicular to the slight curvature of the case (they don't go straight down).

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  • Use your fingers to pry the lower case away from the body of the MacBook near the vent.Remove the lower case.
    • Use your fingers to pry the lower case away from the body of the MacBook near the vent.

    • Remove the lower case.

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  • Use the edge of a spudger to pry the battery connector upwards from its socket on the logic board.It is useful to pry upward on both short sides of the connector to "walk" it out of its socket. Be careful with the corners of the connectors, they can be easily broken off.
    • Use the edge of a spudger to pry the battery connector upwards from its socket on the logic board.

    • It is useful to pry upward on both short sides of the connector to "walk" it out of its socket. Be careful with the corners of the connectors, they can be easily broken off.

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  • Bend the battery cable slightly away from its socket on the logic board so it does not accidentally connect itself while you work.
    • Bend the battery cable slightly away from its socket on the logic board so it does not accidentally connect itself while you work.

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  • Remove the two Phillips screws securing the hard drive bracket to the upper case.
    • Remove the two Phillips screws securing the hard drive bracket to the upper case.

    • These screws will remain attached to the hard drive bracket.

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  • Remove the hard drive bracket.
    • Remove the hard drive bracket.

    • The hard drive bracket may be firmly seated against the upper case.

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  • Use the attached pull tab to lift the hard drive out of the upper case.
    • Use the attached pull tab to lift the hard drive out of the upper case.

    • Don't try to completely remove the hard drive just yet. It is still attached to the hard drive cable.

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  • Pull the hard drive cable away from the body of the hard drive.Remove the hard drive.
    • Pull the hard drive cable away from the body of the hard drive.

    • Remove the hard drive.

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  • Remove the four 6.0 mm T6 Torx hard drive retaining posts from the sides of the hard drive.Transfer the hard drive retaining posts to your new hard drive.
    • Remove the four 6.0 mm T6 Torx hard drive retaining posts from the sides of the hard drive.

    • Transfer the hard drive retaining posts to your new hard drive.

    • If desired, transfer the pull tab over to your new hard drive.

    • If you are installing a new hard drive, we have an OS X install guide to get you up and running.

    • If you upgraded your EFI Firmware ROM you can also perform an internet recovery.

    Edit

  • Sours: https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/MacBook+Pro+13-Inch+Unibody+Mid+2012+Hard+Drive+Replacement/10378

    Question:Q:what ssd goes into my mid 2012 macbook pro 13'

    Looks like no one’s replied in a while. To start the conversation again, simply ask a new question.

    Question:Q:

    what ssd goes into my mid 2012 macbook pro 13'

    Posted on Mar 24, 2018 11:58 AM

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    Mar 24, 2018 12:25 PM in response to DJSBAINS In response to DJSBAINS

    DJSBAINS wrote:

    what ssd goes into my mid 2012 macbook pro 13'

    If it's a "Unibody" model (will say Model No. A1278 on the bottom of the case) then any SSD operating with a SATA III interface should work. Some might work better than others though. Many here recommend the ones that OWC sells because they provide customer support, although they do cost more. Crucial also guarantees compatibility with Macs.

    I have a SanDisk Ultra 3D 512 GB in my mid-2012 Unibody MBP, and it's been working just fine. The one issue that some people have is that a worn SATA connector ribbon sometimes doesn't work well with an SSD for some reason or another. Nobody can say exactly why, other than replacement seems to get it to work.

    Mar 24, 2018 12:25 PM

    Mar 24, 2018 12:28 PM in response to DJSBAINS In response to DJSBAINS

    Most any 2.5" form factor SSD if that is what is now installed. If it already has an SSD installed that is connected to the PCIe bus, then you need a specially made card. Aside from Apple, who will not sell one to you, you need to go to OWC and see if they have a card that does fit along with video tutorials and required toolkits.

    Mar 24, 2018 12:28 PM

    Mar 24, 2018 12:40 PM in response to DJSBAINS In response to DJSBAINS

    Agreed, a new SATA cable is a nominal expense and highly recommended.

    It is however no mystery why old cables fail when switching from HDD to SSD.

    SSD= faster speed= more heat

    In the case of an intermittent generic failure, the electrical continuity of a cracked trace on both sides of the crack is very often a function of the temperature of the unit at the point where the crack exists. As a unit heats up, it expands, and as it expands, the crack widens, eventually forcing a complete electrical separation to exist on both sides of the crack, hence a failure. As it cools down, electrical contact may once again be restored.

    Those SATA cables are actually not cables but flexible circuit boards, usually mylar, with printed circuit traces taking the place of wires. This type of cable can experience cracks in traces due to aging, heat, vibration, impact and abrasion. They can be damaged quite easily if the unit is mishandled during assembly or re-assembly.

    The SATA cable is the weak link, one of many reasons Apple went to the PCI-e and soldered-in storage.

    Mar 24, 2018 12:40 PM

    Mar 24, 2018 12:51 PM in response to DJSBAINS In response to DJSBAINS

    The 2012 Macbook Pro uses a standard 2.5 inch SATA hard drive, which is what most laptop computers are using. Where I work we use Samsung SSD's and never had a problem, but you're free to use any 2.5 inch SATA SSD of your choice.

    MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2012 Hard Drive Replacement - iFixit

    User uploaded file

    Mar 24, 2018 12:51 PM

    Mar 24, 2018 12:49 PM in response to leroydouglas In response to leroydouglas

    So that instead of spending $29 on another ribbon cable you get to spend $290 to replace a dead SSD. I doubt that ribbon cable is the true weak link in the major scheme of things. 😁

    Mar 24, 2018 12:49 PM

    Mar 24, 2018 12:53 PM in response to DJSBAINS In response to DJSBAINS

    Just to add - there really isn't much performance difference between SATA SSDs these days. They are all limited by the speed of the SATA III interface and all have nearly the same performance. The big worry isn't about performance but long-term reliability.

    Mar 24, 2018 12:53 PM

    Mar 24, 2018 12:55 PM in response to Kappy In response to Kappy

    Kappy wrote:

    So that instead of spending $29 on another ribbon cable you get to spend $290 to replace a dead SSD. I doubt that ribbon cable is the true weak link in the major scheme of things. 😁

    Or $900+ on a complete logic board for the latest models. 😮

    Mar 24, 2018 12:55 PM

    User profile for user: DJSBAINS DJSBAINS

    Question:Q:what ssd goes into my mid 2012 macbook pro 13'

    Sours: https://discussions.apple.com/thread/8331566
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    Samsung EVO 860 vs Crucial MX500

    Are you still using an old 2012 MacBook Pro? Yep, that’s my model (mid-2012). I love my MacBook, but well, when it’s starting to show its age, it’s not that speedy anymore.

    Fortunately, there is a quick way to increase the performance of an old Mac — upgrading the internal hard drive to SSD (solid-state drive).

    If you are like me, who still loves the old MacBook and yet to decide to invest in a new yet pricey MacBook, then this guide is for you.

    I am going to share with you a list of the best SSD drives for MacBook Pro 2012, as well as a step-by-step instruction on how to replace the internal HDD with a new SSD so you waste no time and make no mistakes.

    P.S. I went with Crucial BX200 SSD (as shown in the purchase receipt below), and I’m quite happy with the performance it has brought to my Mac. But, BX200 is a legacy product and the company has a new better SSD — Crucial MX500.

    Note: I did the SSD upgrade on my mid-2012 MacBook Pro, so this guide is probably most useful to those of you who are using the same model with me.

    However, I assume it would also apply to older MacBook models like 2011 and 2010 as long as your machine has a standard 2.5-inch SATA drive.

    Disclaimer: I’m not a computer expert but I did extensive research on the topic about the best SSD for MacBook Pro and actually upgraded it by myself (DIY). It’s worth pointing out that MacBook Pros from 2013, 2014, and 2015 have very few SSD upgrade options; And newer MacBook Pro 2016 and 2017 models are not upgradable at all. Also, this post was initially published two years ago, I’ve thus come back to revamp the content making sure the information in the article is accurate as the SSD market changes fast.

    Quick Summary

    Don’t have time to go too deep into the technical field? I understand. Here’s a quick rundown of the best SSDs for MacBook Pro.

    • If you use your old MacBook Pro mainly for lightweight tasks such as surfing the Internet, transferring pictures, etc., an affordable yet high-capacity SSD is best for you. Crucial MX500 is my top pick, followed by Samsung 860 EVO and SanDisk X400.
    • If you use your MacBook Pro for heavy tasks like gaming, photo/video editing, 3D modeling, etc., a pricier performance SSD is best for you. Samsung 860 PRO is the best, OWC Mercury Electra 6G is a great alternative.

    Below, you’ll find more detailed reviews, but you can also click the links above to get more info about each SSD and perhaps order one of them on Amazon so you can get the product as soon as possible.

    Why Trust Me for This SSD Upgrade Guide?

    First of all, I still use a 13″ mid-2012 MacBook Pro, and I have successfully replaced my Mac’s internal hard drive (500GB Hitachi HDD) with a shiny new Crucial SSD which cost me about $140 (tax included) by the time I purchased it in 2016. See these screenshots for evidence.

     

    Here is what happened to my MacBook Pro and why I decided to replace the hard drive with an SSD. The quick answer is: I had to.

    On April 1, 2016…yep, Fools’ Day but it wasn’t a joke. My MacBook Pro went black screen all of a sudden, it stopped working, and I couldn’t turn it on. After sending it to Apple Genius Bar for diagnosis, the geek guy told me it was because the internal hard drive attached to my Mac died and he said the only solution was a replacement.

    To me, it was devastating! The 500GB Hitachi hard drive was working okay for the past four years, and there wasn’t any sign for it to die out until it happened unexpectedly.

    As a result, I lost some documents and pictures that failed to be backed up in time. Lesson learned, the importance of backup!

    Also Read: Best External Drives for Data Backup

    I began to shop around for solid-state drives. For two reasons: first I read that SSDs beat HDDs over many aspects (more in the following section). The other is for fear of HDD failure — yes, I hated Hitachi HDD for a while and decided to give SSD a try.

    After that, I did as much research as I could, both online such as reading industry SSD benchmark tests from StorageReview.com, CNET.com, TechReport.com, AnandTech.com, and offline too — mostly asking computer repair shop technician for advice, and I ended up with ordering a 480GB Crucial BX200 SSD back in 2016.

    After the SSD was delivered, it took me another two days to manage the installation process — opening the hard case, watching OWC and iFixit video instructions, installing the new macOS, etc. the list went on and on. Frankly, I made quite a few mistakes until I got everything right.

    Finally, the SSD was running smoothly on my MacBook Pro.

    But, you don’t have to make those mistakes, as I’m going to share all I’ve learned along the way in this guide.

    My goal is simple: to save you time exploring what the best SSD is for MacBook Pro 2012 (perhaps 2011 too) and avoid pitfalls you might encounter during the installation process.

    Should I Upgrade My Old MacBook Pro to SSD?

    The debate of HDD and SSD has never stopped. HDD stands for hard disk drive, has a much longer history and continues to be the mainstream. SDD, short for solid-state drive, uses a new storage mechanism and starts to get more traction as its price declines which happened just several years ago.

    Both HDDs and SSDs have pros and cons.

    General speaking, HDDs beat SSDs in price and capacity limits; while SSDs are superior to HDDs in performance and durability. If you are interested in learning more, this or this article is worth taking a look.

    There are good reasons why you should consider installing an SSD on a Mac machine.

    In fact, Apple has started to use flash storage in almost all its computer product lines, MacBook Pro included.

    Flash storage is storage that uses electronically erasable memory modules with no moving parts, similar to what a solid-state drive has to offer.

    • Your Mac will be much faster. Case in point, once I installed the new Crucial SSD to my 2012 MacBook Pro, the performance increase blew my mind. Let’s take boot time as an example, in the old days, my Mac took nearly a minute to start up entirely. Now it’s only 10 seconds or so; I’m always amazed to see the startup progress bar flash through…no more spinning wheel. Besides, a Mac with SSD transfer files faster and launches and runs apps faster.
    • It will be more silent. Since an SSD is non-mechanical, it makes virtually no noise unless the fans spin up. A quiet Mac is better than a noisy Mac. Unlike SSDs, mechanical hard drives contain spinning platters and magnetic heads. It’s normal to hear a whining noise or clicking and tapping when the drive is spinning up or accessing data.
    • SSDs are more durable. One main factor that leads to traditional hard drive failure is the heat created from continuous motion generated by small moving parts. “Only 78% of the hard disk drives we buy are living longer than four years”, according to Backblaze. Because a solid-state drive does not have any moving parts, it is more reliable thus safer for the data you’ll save or create on your Mac.
    • SSD price is dropping. According to Lucas Mearian from PCWorld, “The price computer makers paid for solid-state drives (SSDs) declined by as much as 12% over the last quarter”, he noted later “SSD adoption rates in laptop computers will grow by more than 30% this year.” It’s safe to say that SSD price still has room to decline as competition goes on.

    Best SSD Upgrade for MacBook Pro: 5 Great Choices

    For general users who prefer a cheaper yet high-capacity SSD, Crucial MX500 is my top pick, followed by Samsung 860 EVO. In case both options went out of stock, SanDisk X400 is an excellent alternative.

    For power users who are less price-sensitive and have high-performance demands, Samsung 860 PRO is surely a winner in the market. If it is not available, OWC Mercury Electra 6G is a great option.

    Pro tip: once you secure the desired SSD, I also suggest you get the BatPower S2 Mac Laptop Screwdriver set kit — which includes the right screwdriver and other tools you’ll need to open your MacBook Pro case and swap the old hard drive to get the new SSD installed.

    1. Crucial MX500


    As I said in the beginning, I’ve been using a Crucial BX200 480GB (now a legacy product) with my mid-2012 MacBook Pro for about eight months — without any problems! I have a good impression of the Crucial brand and definitely would recommend its products. MX500 is popular because of its price advantage and various capacity options (from 250 GB to 2TB).

    What’s Great:

    • Price is very competitive.
    • Strong security with hardware encryption.
    • Plenty of unique features other products are unable to offer.

    What’s Not So Great:

    • Decent performance but not the fastest SSD Only 3-year warranty

    >> Check Price on Amazon <<

    2. Samsung 860 EVO


    The Samsung EVO series has remained the top position in SATA SSD for several years thanks to its many advantages such as high speed, 5-year warranty, and technology — which I mentioned earlier that Samsung is able to design and make key SSD controllers and parts on its own.

    Another perk of choosing Samsung is the Magician software, which is great for drive installation, maintenance, and faster transfers.

    What’s Great:

    • High performance.
    • Up to 4TB in size 5-year warranty.

    What’s Not So Great:

    • The Samsung Magician software only works with PCs, not Macs.

    >> Check Price on Amazon <<

    3. SanDisk X400


    SanDisk has a word of mouth among its memory card and disk storage market. The company also makes solid-state drives. SanDisk X400, relatively new to the SSD market, aims primarily for business notebook upgrades.

    The SanDisk X400 has four capacities that range from low to high volume. What impressed me most is its performance, which is as good as Samsung 860 EVO.

    What’s Great:

    • Greater endurance with SanDisk’s nCache 2.0 technology.
    • 5-year warranty.

    What’s Not So Great:

    • Does not come with software like Samsung Magician.

    >> Check Price on Amazon <<

    4. Samsung 860 PRO


    This product is essentially an upgraded version of 860 EVO. PRO is designed for gaming and professional computing, while EVO is for everyday computing.

    The differences are that PRO has a higher maximum sequential read speed (i.e. up to 560 MB/s) while EVO is up to 550MB/s. But 860 PRO is much more expensive than 860 EVO as well.

    What’s Great:

    • Excellent performance, much faster than 860 EVO.
    • A lot of great features and capacity options.

    What’s Not So Great:

    • Samsung Magician software is not available for Mac users.
    • Changed the warranty from 10-year to 5-year.

    >> Check Price on Amazon <<

    5. OWC Mercury Electra 6G


    OWC (stands for Other World Computing), is a computer hardware provider since 1988. I got to know the brand when I was searching for video tutorials about how to open my MacBook Pro case.

    The OWC team has created tons of really awesome videos that make it hassle-free to replace any Mac components all by yourself.

    The OWC Mercury Electra 6G SSD features high-quality and supports disk encryption.

    What’s Great:

    • Excellent in performance.
    • Offers useful video tutorials for SSD installation.

    What’s Not So Great:

    • Price is a bit higher than that of other options.

    >> Check Price on Amazon <<

    Disclaimer: this review and guide are primarily based on 1) my own experiencing shopping and installing a solid-state drive on my mid-2012 MacBook Pro; 2) the expertise of SSD and computer experts with whom I consult; 3) the information accessible via the manufacturers’ websites. As thus, the above recommendations are my own opinions and I reserve the right to change my opinions when necessary. Your Mac’s performance may vary after swapping the drive. Also, it may make more sense to buy a new SSD laptop instead of spending money on upgrading components.

    Best SSD for 2012 MacBook Pro: What to Consider?

    Now that you are ready to purchase for an SSD and retire the old hard drive on your MacBook Pro. Which SSD should you get?

    Here are some factors you should consider. Note that this article is focused on internal SSD upgrade for MacBook Pro, NOT an external SSD as the criteria are different.

    You can read our best portable SSD roundup for more.

    Budget

    Although the price of SSD has been falling, the range still varies a lot. For example, the cheapest SSDs cost more than a hundred US Dollars while the most expensive ones are priced at over $1000 which could allow you to buy a new Mac machine.

    So, the first thing is to ask yourself — how much can I afford to get an SSD for my MacBook? For example, between $100 and $150, or around $200, etc.

    Note: a cheaper SSD does not mean it’s not good, there are many other factors such as drive size, the brand, etc. that affect the price.

    Storage Capacity

    The volume of an SSD is one of the most important factors you should consider. At this moment, it’s not common to see SSDs available for sale that is less than 500GB in size. In other words, 500GB is almost the base capacity you could choose from most manufacturers.

    This is because smaller drivers are often slower and more expensive considering the cost per gigabyte. Also, as camera technology improves, photos and videos often have much larger file sizes.

    If you are used to syncing these files with your Mac, the chances are that your Mac will be filled up much faster than ever before. So, consider a 750GB or 1TB if you have a need for large storage.

    You could consider 4TB, but in my opinion, it is an overkill, and a 4TB SSD is usually way more expensive.

    Performance

    There is a saying in the storage world that even the worst SSD is miles ahead of an HDD in terms of speed. But not all SSDs are made equal. Drives with larger capacities tend to be faster in writing and reading, thanks to an SSD’s speed advantage that comes from parallelization.

    But the difference wouldn’t be night and day.

    For most MacBook Pro users, a cheaper yet high-capacity SSD is enough to meet your daily computing needs.

    For those of you who make a living in fields like design, development, or workstation, etc. that requires a MacBook Pro to move large files and handle request very quickly, then consider a high-budget, high-performance SSD.

    Brand

    Buying an SSD is a big investment, and it’s serious business as the drive carries all your personal or business data.

    You don’t want to get an SSD that is insecure, defective or from a manufacturer that doesn’t offer quality customer service.

    That’s why choosing a brand is important.

    In general, I buy products from brands that are trustworthy like Apple, Samsung, Crucial, SanDisk, etc. For SSD manufacturers, another factor why brand matters is that quality and warranty.

    For example, during my research, I know Samsung makes its own SSD controllers, memory, and firmware, which gave me confidence that the company is capable of designing and putting together the entire SSD from start to end.

    Also, brands like Crucial and Samsung all offer 3-5 year warranty for their SSDs…another bonus.

    Compatibility

    Not all Macs support SSD upgrade and not all SSDs fit into the Mac model you own. For example, the most recent MacBooks are all with SSDs and they are blazing fast and based on 4-channel PCIe interface (Source: 9to5mac), there is no need to upgrade unless you have particular reasons.

    If you are using a Retina MacBook Pro or Air that was made mid-2013 or later, it’s almost impossible to upgrade the hard drive because PCIe-based SSDs don’t use standard connectors.

    Even if your Mac like MacBook Pro/Air prior to 2013 is able for SSD upgrade, you should be careful because MacBooks don’t use standard SSD designs and MBPs and Airs share different types with each other.

    Fortunately, MacBook Pros from 2012 and before are compatible with 2.5-inch SATA drives which most SSD manufacturers provide.

    How to Upgrade MacBook Pro to SSD: 4-Step Guide

    So you’ve bought and received your desired solid-state drive (and perhaps the screwdrivers and tools needed to open your Mac case), now what? Open the case of your MacBook Pro and put the SSD inside? Wrong.

    You’ll need to make sure you’ve backed up all the data on your old hard disk drive (if it’s still working) and created a bootable installer for macOS (see how to do this in Step 2).

    Note: if the internal hard drive in your MacBook Pro has crashed or died, I highly recommend you schedule an appointment with Apple Genius Bar. Their geek team will install the latest macOS for you, so you don’t have to take the time to make a bootable installer. Also, you don’t need to buy any screwdrivers or tools because they will open the case for you as well.

    Step 1: Back up Your Mac Hard Drive

    The easiest way is to use Time Machine. You can also clone your Mac hard drive to an external drive. Cloning is complementary to backup methods like Time Machine, and I encourage you to do so if you have extra portable drives. This ensures you get up and make your Mac work again in minutes in case any system crash/errors during update.

    Step 2: Create a Bootable macOS USB Installer

    The USB installer allows you to quickly boot up your Mac just in case, especially when the Internet Recovery option isn’t available to use.

    All you have to prepare is a USB flash drive with a large capacity because the file size of the latest macOS is not small.

    You can read this article on how to make it.

    Step 3: Open MacBook Pro Case and Install SSD

    This is the key part that you need to be extra careful. Any misoperation could damage your Mac. Fortunately, OWC has recorded a detailed instruction in this video. I highly recommend you watch it before you start.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I7co5-qJhuM

    Step 4: Run macOS Installation and Transfer Data

    Once you finish the SSD replacement work, plug in the USB flash drive (with the bootable installer you made in Step 2) to your MacBook Pro.

    Now press the start button to turn on your Mac. Hold down the Option key as soon as you hear the reboot tone.

    Select the disk named “Install macOS (latest version)” and install the operating system to your MacBook Pro. After that, use Time Machine to restore all the data.

    What is TRIM and Should I Enable It on My SSD MacBook Pro

    For Mac computers, TRIM is a command that helps macOS know where the data you want to delete or move is stored. The main benefit of enabling TRIM is to make it faster to write to empty memory thus prolong the life of your SSD. Do you really need to enable it?

    In my opinion, no. Because I haven’t noticed any slowdown with my Crucial SSD (yet). Plus, Apple didn’t support TRIM for aftermarket SSDs until OS X 10.10.4 (source: AppleInsider).

    How to check if your SSD is TRIM enabled or not on your MacBook Pro? Click on Apple logo on the top left corner > About This Mac > System Report > SATA/SATA Express, then select your SSD disk and check “TRIM Support.”

    If you want to enable TRIM, this CNET article shows how to do it step by step. You can also watch this YouTube guide if you prefer a video tutorial. Just a kind warning: before you proceed, make sure you backup your Mac just in case.

    Tips To Keep Your SSD-based MacBook Pro in Good Shape

    In the digital age, nothing lasts forever. All devices and hardware components have a lifespan. Eventually, they will be gone.

    An SSD drive is no exception. All we can do is try our best to extend its life and maximize the value. Even if it fails someday, it won’t cause panic.

    That said, here are some helpful tips and tricks you may want to apply:

    • Always backup your SSD data to another place, be it an external drive or cloud storage, it doesn’t matter. Backup is the only effective way to avoid data loss disasters.
    • Never erase or format your SSD drive. You’ve learned the difference between how HDDs and SSDs work, there is no need to wipe an SSD clean by making unnecessary write cycles because doing so will only degrade your SSD life.
    • Update firmware from your manufacturer. Most solid-state drive providers like Samsung release firmware updates regularly. It’s always a good idea to visit the manufacturer’s website and install the firmware.
    • Do not use up all your SSD storage space. Even if you’ve chosen a small-size SSD for your MacBook, aim to have at least 10% free space. Optimize your Mac on a regular basis.
    • Avoid exposing your SSD and MacBook to extreme temperatures. Although SSDs are more durable and resistant than HDDs when it comes to cold and hot, leaving your SSD-based MacBook Pro in such environment too long is a bad idea for sure.

    Final Words

    When your old MacBook Pro runs slow or starts to act up like freezing up randomly, it’s better to watch out as there could be something wrong with the hard drive.

    In my case, I’ve personally experienced internal hard drive crash with my mid-2012 MacBook Pro.

    Fortunately, you don’t need to abandon your old Mac and get a new one. Replacing the internal hard drive with a solid-state drive has been a great way to boost your Mac performance while spending less.

    However, choosing the best MacBook Pro SSD isn’t an easy task because there are so many factors you may want to consider.

    Plus, the installation process could easily go wrong if you don’t know what you are doing. Anyway, I hope this guide above has given you some useful directions.

    Whether you are a general user who’s selected a Crucial MX500, or you are a power user who has secured a Samsung 860 PRO, they both are awesome SSDs for Mac laptops.

    Also, don’t underestimate the SSD installation part as it could be quite time-consuming if you don’t have the right tools at hand.

    If you have any additional questions regarding SSDs for mid-2012 MacBook Pro, leave a comment below.

    Chris Hwang

    Chris is a lifelong tech enthusiast with a broad range of interests including coding, data analysis, traveling, and more. He used to work as a software programmer immersing himself in the world of codes, now he finds it more interesting talking to real people.

    Sours: https://www.anysoftwaretools.com/best-ssd-for-macbook-pro/
    Macbook Pro SSD Upgrade (2011/2012/2013)

    MacBook Pro 13" Retina Display Late 2012 SSD Replacement

  • Wedge your fingers between the upper case and the lower case.
    • Wedge your fingers between the upper case and the lower case.

    • Gently pull the lower case away from the upper case.

    • Remove the lower case and set it aside.

    Edit

  • Edit

  • Remove the following screws securing the battery connector board to the logic board:
    • Remove the following screws securing the battery connector board to the logic board:

    • Two 2.8 mm T6 Torx screws

    • One 7.0 mm T6 Torx shouldered screw

    Edit

  • Use tweezers to remove the small plastic cover located near the bottom right of the battery connector board.Use tweezers to remove the small plastic cover located near the bottom right of the battery connector board.
    • Use tweezers to remove the small plastic cover located near the bottom right of the battery connector board.

    Edit

  • Remove the wide head 6.4 mm T6 Torx screw securing the battery connector to the logic board assembly.
    • Remove the wide head 6.4 mm T6 Torx screw securing the battery connector to the logic board assembly.

    Edit

  • Carefully lift the battery connector board up off the logic board.It is recommended to bend the battery cables just slightly, to keep the board suspended up above the logic board and out of the way.
    • Carefully lift the battery connector board up off the logic board.

    • It is recommended to bend the battery cables just slightly, to keep the board suspended up above the logic board and out of the way.

    • Do not fold the board completely over, or crease the cables, as this may damage the battery.

    Edit

  • Grasp the Interposer with tweezers.An interposer is the name for an interface that links one electrical connection to another. In this repair, it is the board connecting the battery to logic board.
    • Grasp the Interposer with tweezers.

    • An interposer is the name for an interface that links one electrical connection to another. In this repair, it is the board connecting the battery to logic board.

    • Lift the Interposer off the logic board and remove it.

    • Removing this board will ensure that the battery remains disconnected throughout your repair, preventing your computer from accidentally powering on. It's also a good idea to take it out so it doesn't fall out unexpectedly.

    Edit

  • Use the flat end of a spudger to pry the SSD cable connector up from its socket on the logic board.Use the flat end of a spudger to pry the SSD cable connector up from its socket on the logic board.
    • Use the flat end of a spudger to pry the SSD cable connector up from its socket on the logic board.

    Edit

  • Edit

  • Remove the SSD assembly from the upper case.
    • Remove the SSD assembly from the upper case.

    Edit

  • Remove the single 2.9 mm T5 Torx screw securing the SSD to the SSD tray.
    • Remove the single 2.9 mm T5 Torx screw securing the SSD to the SSD tray.

    Edit

  • Insert the edge of plastic opening tool between the SSD and the SSD tray, opposite to the socket side of SSD tray.Pry the side of the SSD opposite the SSD tray socket out of the SSD tray.
    • Insert the edge of plastic opening tool between the SSD and the SSD tray, opposite to the socket side of SSD tray.

    • Pry the side of the SSD opposite the SSD tray socket out of the SSD tray.

    • Only lift the SSD up far enough to grab the sides of it with your fingers. Lifting it any more may damage the card or socket.

    Edit

  • Carefully pull the SSD straight out of its socket on the SSD tray.Carefully pull the SSD straight out of its socket on the SSD tray.
    • Carefully pull the SSD straight out of its socket on the SSD tray.

    Edit

  • Sours: https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/MacBook+Pro+13-Inch+Retina+Display+Late+2012+SSD+Replacement/12823

    Ssd 2012 macbook pro

    She found large leaves of an unknown plant similar to an earth plantain, tied an open wound on the butt, picked up two poles and slowly stepping with bare feet on. The slippery muddy bottom, began to move forward to the center of the swamp, checking the depth and unsteadiness of the bog with the poles. - Does the horseradish pull her into the swamp all the time.

    - asked a man with a military bearing, - she is not a suicide by chance. - How much do I know, - replied a man who introduced himself to Fedosonya as a clerk, - maybe a suicide, since she is so eager to drown.

    MacBook Pro Mid-2012 SSD and RAM Upgrade Tutorial

    When the sparks in my eyes passed a little, I was able to make out Marina's friend. Oksana had a short, almost boyish haircut, her blonde hair was shaved upright from the sides and combed to the side. She was wearing a minimum of makeup and at first I would even mistake her for a guy if I didn't know.

    And she was dressed appropriately: a short black jacket, a gray sweater, jeans and sneakers.

    Now discussing:

    And where are your parents. - We left for Austria to work. But they didnt take me and my grandmother, shes old.



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