Thunderbolt 3 to lightning adapter

Thunderbolt 3 to lightning adapter DEFAULT

Apple USB-C to Lightning Cable (1m)

Description

Connect your iPhone, iPad, or iPod with Lightning connector to your USB-C or Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) enabled Mac for syncing and charging, or to your USB-C enabled iPad for charging.

You can also use this cable with your Apple 18W, 20W, 29W, 30W, 61W, or 87W or 96W USB-C Power Adapter to charge your iOS or iPadOS device, and even take advantage of the fast-charging feature on select iPhone and iPad models.

Compatibility

iPhone Models
• iPhone 13 mini
• iPhone 13
• iPhone 13 Pro
• iPhone 13 Pro Max
• iPhone 12 Pro Max
• iPhone 12 Pro
• iPhone 12
• iPhone 12 mini
• iPhone 11 Pro
• iPhone 11 Pro Max
• iPhone 11
• iPhone SE (1st and 2nd generation)
• iPhone XS
• iPhone XS Max
• iPhone XR
• iPhone X
• iPhone 8
• iPhone 8 Plus
• iPhone 7
• iPhone 7 Plus
• iPhone 6s
• iPhone 6s Plus
• iPhone 6
• iPhone 6 Plus
• iPhone 5s
• iPhone 5c
• iPhone 5

iPad Models
• iPad Pro 12.9-inch (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th generation)
• iPad Pro 11-inch (1st, 2nd, and 3rd generation)
• iPad Pro 10.5-inch
• iPad Pro 9.7-inch
• iPad (5th, 6th, 8th, and 9th generation)
• iPad Air (3rd generation)
• iPad Air 2
• iPad Air (1st generation)
• iPad mini (5th and 6th generation)
• iPad mini 4
• iPad mini 3
• iPad mini 2
• iPad mini (1st generation)

Mac Models
• MacBook Air (M1, 2020)
• MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2020)
• MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2018–2019)
• MacBook Pro (13-inch, M1, 2020)
• MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2020)
• MacBook Pro (16-inch, 2019)
• MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016–2019)
• MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2016–2019)
• MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2015–2017)
• iMac (Retina 4.5k, 24-inch, 2021)
• iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, 2020)
• iMac (Retina 4K, 21.5-inch, 2019)
• iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, 2019)
• iMac (Retina 4K, 21.5-inch, 2017)
• iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, 2017)
• iMac Pro (2017)
• Mac Pro (2019)
• Mac mini (M1, 2020)
• Mac mini (2018)

iPod Models
• iPod touch (5th, 6th, and 7th generation)
• iPod nano (7th generation)

AirPods Models
• AirPods Max
• AirPods Pro
• AirPods with Wireless Charging Case (2nd generation)
• AirPods with Charging Case (2nd generation)
• AirPods (1st generation)
• Wireless Charging Case for AirPods

Sours: https://www.target.com/p/apple-usb-c-to-lightning-cable-1m/-/A-79231464
  • We’ve updated this guide to reflect some recent advances in the USB-C standard, but our picks are unchanged.

October 4, 2021

If you have a device with a USB-C port—such as a MacBook or other compatible laptop, an iPad Pro, a Nintendo Switch, or an Android phone—you need a cable to charge it and to transfer data to and from other devices. Unfortunately, when it comes to USB-C, even cables that look identical can behave very differently—for instance, a cable that charges your phone at top speed might be sluggish at transferring music files, or vice versa. We’ve tested 78 cables and 16 adapters to help you find the right one for your needs without overspending.

A quick primer on USB specifications for those living in blissful oblivion: While ordinary USB-A ports are limited to just 12 watts of charging power, USB-C ports can provide 18 watts of fast-charging power to phones and, more rarely, up to 240 watts to laptops (depending on the cable and device you plug into them). Apple’s Lightning ports can use regular 12-watt charging with a USB-A cable and faster charging via USB-C. Micro-USB and Mini-USB can provide only regular charging regardless of a USB-A or USB-C connection. Each has different capabilities and limitations in charging power and speed (measured in watts, W) and data-transfer speed between devices (measured in megabits per second, Mbps, or gigabits per second, Gbps).

Best for charging USB-C phones, tablets, and laptops

Cable Matters USB-C to USB-C Charging Cable

The best cable for charging phones, tablets, and laptops, the Cable Matters USB-C to USB-C cable.

Why you might prefer it: The Cable Matters USB-C to USB-C Charging Cable is rated for 100 W charging, so it can recharge even large laptops such as the 16-inch MacBook Pro, which comes with a 96 W charger, at full speed. At 6.6 feet, it’s as long as any cable we tested in this category (it also comes in a 3.3-foot length). It’s USB-IF certified—meaning that it meets a set of criteria designed by the USB Implementers Forum, a nonprofit corporation run by Apple, Intel, Microsoft, and other tech giants—and it has a one-year warranty backed by a company we trust. And although it performs just as well as Apple’s 6.6-foot and 3.3-foot MacBook Pro charging cables (which aren’t USB-IF certified), it costs half as much.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: This cable supports only USB 2.0 data-transfer speeds, so it’s not the best option for moving big files around. It’s also thicker and bulkier than many of our other picks, but that’s a fine trade-off for maximum charging power.

  • USB 2.0 data-transfer rates (up to 480 Mbps)
  • 100-watt charging
  • 6.6 feet long (also available in 3.3 feet)

Cable Matters Slim Series Long USB-C to USB-C Charging Cable

A long USB-C to USB-C cable, the Cable Matters Slim Series.

Why you might prefer it: The Cable Matters Slim Series Long USB-C to USB-C Charging Cable is a luxurious 10 feet in length (though it also comes in 3-foot and 6-foot versions), allowing you to charge your phone, tablet, or laptop from a faraway outlet. In our testing, it was able to deliver up to 60 W of power to charge USB-C devices—even a 13-inch MacBook Pro running multiple programs—at top speed. Few laptops need more than 60 watts. The body of the cable is slim and flexible enough that you can easily wind it up and stow it in a bag or drawer, and its rubber exterior has a pleasantly grippy texture. Like our main pick in this category, it costs about half as much as Apple’s MacBook Pro charging cable and less than most other options, plus it’s backed by a lifetime warranty.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: Like our main pick in this category, this cable has maddeningly slow USB 2.0 data-transfer rates, and it’s not quite as powerful as that model (supporting up to 60 W instead of 100 W). It’s not USB-IF certified, and its housings are slightly worse than those of a lot of our other picks—instead of one seamless piece of plastic, the housings have a plastic grip and a small rubber collar, a design that in our experience breaks more easily—but given the lifetime warranty, this cable is still a safe bet.

  • USB 2.0 data-transfer rates (up to 480 Mbps)
  • 60-watt charging
  • 10 feet long (also available in 3 and 6 feet)

Nekteck USB-C to USB-C Cable with 60W USB GaN Charger

The best USB-C to USB-C with charger, the Nekteck USB-C to USB-C Cable.

Why you might prefer it: The Nekteck USB-C to USB-C Cable with 60W USB GaN Charger is typically priced about the same as Apple’s comparable MacBook charging cable—and as a bonus, it’s packaged with our favorite wall charger. Either item would be a good value on its own, but the bundle is a steal. The 6.6-foot cable is long enough to reach most outlets from a desk or couch. Its housings are as sturdy as any we tested, and the main body of the cable is slim and flexible. It’s also USB-IF certified and backed by a one-year warranty.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: Like the rest of our picks in this category, this cable has sluggish USB 2.0 data-transfer rates. It can’t provide as much power as the 100 W Cable Matters version, but it had no trouble powering devices at up to 60 W in our testing.

  • USB 2.0 data-transfer rates (up to 480 Mbps)
  • 60-watt charging
  • 6.6 feet long

Best for monitors and fast data transfer (USB-C and Thunderbolt 3)

Nekteck USB-C to USB-C 3.1 Gen 2 Cable

The best cable for monitors and data transfer, the Nekteck USB-C to USB-C 3.1 Gen 2 Cable.

Our pick

Nekteck USB-C to USB-C 3.1 Gen 2 Cable

Nekteck USB-C to USB-C 3.1 Gen 2 Cable

Great at a desk

If you need one cable that does everything, this is the cable to get. It supports fast data-transfer speeds (up to 10 Gbps), can output video to a monitor, and can charge any USB-C laptop, even the 16-inch MacBook Pro, at full speed. It’s overkill (and short) for charging a phone, though.

Why you might prefer it: The Nekteck USB-C to USB-C 3.1 Gen 2 Cable can do it all. Like all the cables we considered for this category, it meets USB-C specifications (cables that violate those specs can potentially damage devices). As long as you’re using the right charger, it can charge any USB-C device, even a 16-inch MacBook Pro, at up to 100 W speeds. It also moves data as fast as a non-Thunderbolt USB-C port currently allows, namely USB 3.1 Gen 2 speeds of up to 10 Gbps. That’s fast enough to transfer a full-length HD movie file in about three seconds. The cable’s housings are sturdily built, with ample room for gripping. Plus, it costs only about $10 at this writing.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: This cable isn’t as practical for people who need to charge only a phone or other device, since it’s only 3.3 feet long and thicker than most of our other picks. But that’s true of any USB 3.1 Gen 2 cable; if the wires inside were any longer or slimmer, you’d lose data-transfer speeds. Plus, since you’re likely to use this type of cable to connect a laptop to a storage drive, a dock, or a monitor—and not expecting it to reach from your nightstand to your bed, for example—it doesn’t have to be especially long, slim, or flexible. This cable has only a one-year warranty, in contrast to the lifetime warranty on the similar cable we recommend from Anker below.

  • USB 3.1 Gen 2 data-transfer rates (up to 10 Gbps)
  • 100-watt charging
  • 3.3 feet long

Anker PowerLine II USB-C to USB-C 3.1 Gen 2 Cable

The best cable with a lifetime warranty, the Anker PowerLine II USB-C to USB-C 3.1 Gen 2 Cable.

Why you might prefer it:Anker’s PowerLine II USB-C to USB-C 3.1 Gen 2 Cable is another great option if you want to transfer data quickly (10 Gbps) as well as charge phones, tablets, laptops, and other USB-C devices that require up to 100 W of power. Like Nekteck’s version, this Anker cable is sturdy and well built, and it’s USB-IF certified. Plus, it comes with a handy Velcro fastener to keep your cable neatly coiled, and it has a lifetime warranty backed by a company we trust. We also slightly prefer the sleeker-looking housings on this cable to those of the Nekteck.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: Like any fully functioning USB 3.1 Gen 2 cable, this Anker cable is short (3 feet) and too thick and rigid to easily pack into a drawer or bag—though the included cable tie helps. It’s also twice the price of our main pick in this category, but it performed just as well in our testing, and the lifetime warranty and more streamlined housing design slightly outweigh the extra cost.

  • USB 3.1 Gen 2 data-transfer rates (up to 10 Gbps)
  • 100-watt charging
  • 3 feet long

Anker USB-C Thunderbolt 3 Cable

The most powerful Thunderbolt 3 cable, the Anker USB-C Thunderbolt 3 Cable.

Why you might prefer it: This cable could be considered the “professional” pick, likely to be overkill in most homes. Rated for 100 W charging, the Anker USB-C Thunderbolt 3 Cable can charge a 16-inch MacBook Pro or any high-powered laptop. It’s Thunderbolt 3 capable, so although it looks like any other USB-C–to–USB-C cable (aside from the Thunderbolt logo on each end), it can transfer data up to four times faster (40 Gbps) between supported devices. When you use it with non-Thunderbolt USB-C devices, it functions as a USB-C cable that supports 100 W charging and USB 3.1 Gen 2 data-transfer speeds. The housings attaching the plugs to the main body of the cable aren’t as robust as those of some other Anker cables, but they seem sturdy and roomy enough to let you get a firm grasp. Notably, this cable’s 18-month warranty is the best coverage length we’ve seen in this category, and that should give you plenty of time to test the cable out with your devices and decide whether it works properly for you.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: The Anker USB-C Thunderbolt 3 Cable is shorter than we’d like, but there’s a practical reason. Sources including AppleInsider have reported that Thunderbolt 3 cables longer than 1.6 feet do not support data transfer at full speed, unless you’re willing to pay a premium for an active cable (such as Nekteck’s Thunderbolt 3 cable). And since most people are likely to use this cable at their desktop—for example, to connect a laptop to a portable SSD right next to it—1.6 feet seems plenty long. This Anker cable is also rather thick, but that’s true of all Thunderbolt 3 cables, since bulkier wiring is required for them to perform properly.

  • Thunderbolt 3 data-transfer rates (up to 40 Gbps)
  • 100-watt charging
  • 1.6 feet long

Nekteck Active Thunderbolt 3 Cable

The best long thunderbolt 3 cable, the Nekteck Active.

Why you might prefer it: This is another cable that’s overkill for the kinds of devices most people have in their homes but ideal for professionals who can take advantage of super-fast data transfers and need something longer than the standard 3 feet. Like our main pick in this category, the 6.6-foot Nekteck Active Thunderbolt 3 Cable offers plenty of power for charging USB-C devices up to 100 watts, and in our testing it achieved full Thunderbolt 3 data-transfer rates (up to 40 Gbps). Its housings are nearly identical to those of the Cable Matters USB-C to USB-C Charging Cable, as well. Nekteck’s cable stands apart, though, because it’s one of the few active Thunderbolt 3 cables we’ve found being sold by a reputable brand. “Active” means that even though this Nekteck cable is much longer than Anker’s Thunderbolt 3 cable (6.6 feet versus just 1.6 feet), it doesn’t sacrifice any of the data-transfer capabilities, allowing you to move files between any two compatible devices at top speed. Most people probably don’t need a Thunderbolt 3 cable this long, but it’s always nice to have some extra slack (especially if your laptop isn’t located right next to the device you’re connecting it to, such as a hard drive or monitor). Nekteck’s warranty isn’t quite as long as Anker’s (one year versus 18 months), but it should give you enough time to tell whether you have a dud.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: This is one of the most expensive cables we recommend, selling for more than $50 at this writing. Also, it’s thicker than some other cables and doesn’t bend as well when draped around corners on a nightstand or desk. But if you need a longer option, this Nekteck model is the best value we’ve seen for an active Thunderbolt 3 cable.

  • Thunderbolt 3 data-transfer rates (up to 40 Gbps)
  • 100-watt charging
  • 6.6 feet long

Best for iPhone, iPad, and other Lightning devices

Anker PowerLine II USB-C to Lightning Cable

The best cables for fast-charging Apple devices, Anker Powerline II cables.

Why you might prefer it: Compared with the USB-A chargers and cables that accompany most Apple devices, USB-C–to–Lightning cables allow you to charge iPhones (8 or 8 Plus or later) and most iPad Pros (excluding the newest models, which charge via USB-C) at much faster speeds when you pair them with a high-speed USB-C charger.

Of prime importance, the Anker cables’ MFi-certified status means they meet Apple’s standards to ensure optimal performance with the company’s devices—from iPhones to Magic Trackpads—in terms of charging and data-transfer capabilities.

Although you can find unlicensed third-party options, we chose not to consider them; since such cables might not be fully compatible with Apple devices, you risk the cable fitting incorrectly or overheating and then damaging the cable, your device, or both.

Anker backs both of its cables with a lifetime warranty and its excellent customer support. The cables have a thick, rubber sheath encasing their innards, yet both of them—but especially the 3-foot version—remain flexible and compact enough to stow easily in a pocket or pouch. Plus, each one comes with a convenient hook-and-loop cable tie to keep your cable coiled and to prevent tangling.

Unlike on Apple’s cables, the plastic housings that join the metal connectors to the Anker PowerLine II cables seem sturdy and robust, built to withstand bending or fraying even with frequent use. Compared with most of the other cables we tested, these cables make a satisfying click when plugged into a USB-C port and have minimal wiggling, ensuring a solid connection.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: The official Apple cable comes in 3.3- and 6.6-foot versions, so Anker’s 3- and 6-foot cables are a bit shorter. But they’re still plenty long in most scenarios. And although Apple’s cables are thinner and less bulky than the Anker PowerLine II cables, so they’re more portable, the Apple cables are notoriously flimsy—and they don’t have anything like Anker’s handy hook-and-loop cable ties.

  • USB 2.0 data-transfer rates (up to 480 Mbps)
  • 18 W USB Power Delivery (USB-PD) fast charging
  • 3 feet and 6 feet long

Nomad USB-C to Lightning Cable (3 meters)

A rugged USB-C to Lightening cable, the Nomad USB-C to Lightning Cable.

Why you might prefer it: The 3-meter Nomad USB-C to Lightning Cable is just as fast as any other cable we tested, plus it’s encased in the most rugged sheath of any we’ve seen. The housing is made of a thick, double-braided Kevlar that seems less likely to wear or snag than the more common nylon material. The cable’s plastic housings are sturdy, with little ridges along the collar for added flexibility. At nearly 10 feet, it’s also the longest cable we tested, allowing you to more easily reach faraway outlets. Like the Anker PowerLine II cables, the Nomad is MFi-certified to work with Apple devices. And although Nomad’s five-year warranty doesn’t match Anker’s lifetime warranty, the coverage period is longer than that of most cables we tested. Lastly, the rubber cable tie that comes with the Nomad is more robust than any we’ve seen, with thick ridges fastening it closed, keeping your cable securely coiled.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: Because this cable is longer and more robust than other cables we tested, it’s noticeably bulky if you try to stow it in a pocket or purse. But if you plan to keep it in one place for the most part, or if you have room to spare in your bag, the Nomad’s added bulk might not be too bothersome.

  • USB 2.0 data-transfer rates (up to 480 Mbps)
  • 18 W USB Power Delivery (USB-PD) fast charging
  • 10 feet long (also available in 5 feet)

Best for headphones and other accessories (USB-A and Micro-USB)

Belkin Boost Charge USB-C to USB-A Cable

The best cable for charging from a USB-A port, the Belkin Boost Charge USB-C to USB-A Cable.

Why you might prefer it: The Belkin Boost Charge USB-C to USB-A Cable is your best bet for charging a phone, tablet, or other small USB-C device on a USB-A port. Lots of older wall chargers, car chargers, and laptops have only USB-A ports, so having at least one cable like this around can be useful. The Boost Charge cable isn’t as capable as most of our other picks, but we confirmed in our testing that it can charge devices at up to 15 W of power, which is the limit for this type of cable. The plastic housings felt pleasantly rounded and comfortable to grasp while we were plugging and unplugging, and they seemed firmly attached to the body. The cable itself is also thin and flexible, making it easy to coil up and stow in a bag or pocket. It’s 6.6 feet long, which is the perfect length to reach from an outlet to a bedside table or desk, though it also comes in a 3.3-foot version if you prefer a shorter cable. In addition, it’s USB-IF certified, backed by a two-year warranty, and priced at only $10 or so at this writing.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: The Boost Charge cable is limited to slow USB 2.0 data-transfer rates (up to 480 Mbps). But since most people will be using it only to charge small devices, that isn’t a huge deal.

  • USB 2.0 data-transfer rates (up to 480 Mbps)
  • 15-watt charging
  • 6.6 feet long (also available in 3.3 feet)

Anker PowerLine II USB-C to USB-A 3.1 Gen 2 Cable

Our favorite short cable for data transfer, the Anker PowerLine II USB-C to USB-A 3.1 Gen 2 Cable.

Why you might prefer it: The Anker PowerLine II USB-C to USB-A 3.1 Gen 2 Cable is something of a rarity, a USB-C–to–USB-A cable with fast data-transfer capabilities up to 10 Gbps. If you need a cable like that—to charge a USB-C phone on a laptop’s USB-A port and also transfer files between them, for example—this is the one to get. In our testing, it achieved full data-transfer speeds, and like our main pick in this category, it can charge small devices with up to 15 W of power. The body of the cable is pleasantly thin and flexible, and the housings on either end are made of a solid piece of plastic, a design that we’ve found makes housings last longer, without breaking, compared with designs using a rubber collar. This cable is USB-IF certified, and unlike some of our other favorite Anker cables, it’s backed by an impressive lifetime warranty.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: The biggest drawback of this cable is that it’s short—just 3 feet long—but that’s the longest a USB 3.1 Gen 2 cable can be without adding lots of extra bulk. And although it’s fairly inexpensive, it still costs a little more than the $10 Belkin.

  • USB 3.1 Gen 2 data-transfer rates (up to 10 Gbps)
  • 15-watt charging
  • 3 feet long

Amazon Basics USB Type-C to USB 3.1 Gen 1 Adapter

Our favorite cable for connecting USB-A cables to USB-C ports, the Amazon Basics USB Type-C adapter.

Why you might prefer it: The Amazon Basics USB Type-C to USB 3.1 Gen 1 Adapter is great if you’ve bought a laptop devoid of USB-A ports, such as a MacBook Pro, and don’t feel like immediately replacing every older cable and flash drive you own. The advantage of a cable over a nub is that it moves the connected USB-A cable or flash drive away from the computer a bit—about 6 inches in this case. That extra length and flexibility can make it easier to use certain accessories, especially those with wide plugs. This adapter is USB-IF certified, it performed well in our testing, and it supports USB 3.1 Gen 1 (another way of saying USB 3.0) data-transfer rates up to 5 Gbps. It can also carry up to 15 W of charging power, allowing you to charge small devices at top speed. Available for $10 at this writing, it’s also one of the least expensive models we tested.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: Amazon Basics’s adapter has the shortest warranty (one year) of any we tested. But we’ve had generally good experiences with the company’s customer service, and a year should give you enough time to decide if this adapter suits your needs.

  • USB 3.0 data-transfer rates (up to 5 Gbps)
  • 15-watt charging
  • 6.3 inches long

Amazon Basics USB Type-C to Micro-B 2.0 Cable

The best Micro-USB charging cable, the Amazon Basics USB Type-C to Micro-B 2.0 Cable.

Why you might prefer it: The Amazon Basics USB Type-C to Micro-B 2.0 Cable is a great option for charging small Micro-USB–powered devices (such as a pair of wireless headphones) on a laptop, wall charger, or power bank’s USB-C port. It’s 3 feet long (it comes in 6-inch and 6-foot versions, too, but we didn’t test those) and it has a nicely built, slim design. In our testing, it reached full charging (up to 15 watts) and USB 2.0 data-transfer speeds. It’s also USB-IF certified and backed by Amazon’s one-year warranty. Plus, it’s about half the price of comparable cables.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: Only a handful of Micro-USB–to–USB-C cables from reputable vendors are available, for good reason—such cables don’t charge any faster than their Micro-USB–to–USB-A brethren, yet they generally cost more since they’re so niche. This Amazon Basics cable’s housings are also more angular and clunky than those on most of our favorite cables, but we can live with that drawback since other contenders in this category were more expensive.

  • USB 2.0 data-transfer rates (up to 480 Mbps)
  • 15-watt charging
  • 3 feet long (also available in 6 inches and 6 feet)

Anker PowerLine II 3-in-1 Cable

The best 3-in-1 cable, the Anker PowerLine II 3-in-1 Cable.

Why you might prefer it: A three-in-one cable is, essentially, a USB-A–to–Micro-USB cable with Lightning and USB-C adapters attached by short tethers. Although we don’t recommend using such a cable on a daily basis because it’s limited to slow charging and data speeds and the adapters can be a pain, we do think one can be handy for travel or as a backup you can throw in your desk drawer.

Of those we tried, the Anker PowerLine II 3-in-1 Cable was the clear winner. It’s MFi-certified, it got top marks in our power-draw and data-transfer tests (like every three-in-one cable we tested, it supports only USB 2.0 data speeds), and it seems well made. It’s a slim cable that’s easy to coil up and stow in a bag, and we found its adapters the easiest to plug and unplug—the other ones we tried were fussy and difficult to wrangle.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: In theory, having a three-in-one cable is a convenient, compact alternative to carrying around three individual cables. But in practice, we found all of them cumbersome to use—an inelegant method of addressing different standards and legacy connectors. But if you regularly use all three types (Micro-USB, USB-C, and Lightning) and hate carrying around three different cables, this is a decent option.

We wish its rubber adapter tethers were easier to maneuver and built more sturdily—we fear they might break after repeated use—but none of the models we tested impressed us in that regard. This cable’s slim, compact design and good overall performance make it the best of the worst.

  • USB 2.0 data-transfer rates (up to 480 Mbps)
  • up to 15 W charging
  • 3 feet long
  • black and white color options

The competition

USB-C cables for charging phones, tablets, and laptops

The Anker PowerLine II USB-C to USB-C 2.0 Cable is a former pick. It’s 6 feet long, USB-IF certified, and backed a lifetime warranty, and it offers 60 W charging. But it’s typically more expensive than our current picks in this category.

In our power-draw and data-transfer tests, the Belkin Mixit DuraTek USB-C Cable performed about the same as our Cable Matters pick. It also has a great (five-year) warranty. But we didn’t care for the ridges between the smooth and matte sections of the cable housings—they felt inelegant—and its price is usually more than double that of every other cable we tested in this category.

Apple’s USB-C Charge Cable (2 m) was our former pick in this category, but it’s not USB-IF certified. Plus, our Cable Matters pick is about half the price and just as good.

USB-C cables for transferring data and displaying video

Thunderbolt 3 cables

Although the Apple Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) Cable performed no worse than our Anker pick in our testing, it has a shorter warranty (one year) and costs more. Plus, according to sources such as AppleInsider, any Thunderbolt 3 cable longer than about 1.6 feet (like this one, which is 2.6 feet) can’t provide top data-transfer speeds.

USB-C–to–Lightning cables

The Anker PowerLine+ II Lightning Cable (3 feet) and Anker PowerLine+ II Lightning Cable (6 feet) are pretty much identical to our PowerLine II picks, except they have double-braided nylon sheaths instead of rubber. The different sheath didn’t seem to add much to performance, and these models cost a few dollars more, which is why we didn’t name them as picks. But you should get one of these if you prefer a fabric sheath and don’t want the added length or bulk of our Nomad pick.

Sours: https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/reviews/best-usb-c-cables/
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Adapters for the Thunderbolt 3 or USB-C port on your Mac

Learn about different adapters for the Thunderbolt 3 or USB-C ports on your Mac.

The adapters and cables in this article work with these Mac computers:

  • Mac models introduced in 2016 or later with Thunderbolt 3 ports or Thunderbolt / USB 4 ports. These ports support both Thunderbolt 3 and USB-C connections.
  • Mac models introduced in 2015 or later with USB-C ports. These ports support USB-C connections.


  

To find the right cable or adapter for your Mac, check the connector on the end of the cable meant to plug into your computer.
  

 

Thunderbolt 3  Thunderbolt icon

If you're using a Thunderbolt 3 cable, such as the Apple Thunderbolt 3 Cable with your display or other device, it will connect to your Mac without an adapter.

The Apple Pro Display XDR and LG UltraFine 5K Display use Thunderbolt 3.

 

 

USB-C  USB icon

If you're using a USB-C cable, such as the mophie USB-C Cable with USB-C Connector with your device, it will connect to your Mac without an adapter. 

The LG UltraFine 4K Display uses USB-C.

 

Thunderbolt  Thunderbolt icon or Thunderbolt 2  Thunderbolt icon

If you're using a Thunderbolt or Thunderbolt 2 cable with your Apple Thunderbolt Display or other device, use the Apple Thunderbolt 3 to Thunderbolt 2 Adapter. 

Thunderbolt and Thunderbolt 2 are not the same as Mini DisplayPort Mini DisplayPort icon. They have the same shape, but use different symbols on the cable and port.

 

Mini DisplayPort  Mini DisplayPort icon

If you're using a Mini DisplayPort cable with your display, use a USB-C to Mini DisplayPort cable, such as the mophie USB-C Cable with Mini DisplayPort Connector. Check with its manufacturer for compatibility with your Mac and display model.

Mini DisplayPort is not the same as Thunderbolt or Thunderbolt 2 Thunderbolt icon. They have the same shape, but use different symbols on the cable and port.

DisplayPort

If you're using a DisplayPort cable with your display, use a USB-C to DisplayPort adapter or cable.

 

DVI

If you're using a DVI cable with your display, use a USB-C to DVI adapter or cable. Check with its manufacturer for compatibility with your Mac and display model.

 

 

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Published Date: 

Sours: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT207443
USB-C to LIGHTNING Adapter - Unboxing and Review

A new MacBook Pro comes with either two or four external ports, depending on the model you pick. A new MacBook Air has a pair of ports. But those MacBook ports are only of one type: Thunderbolt, which is compatible with USB-C. A 24-inch iMac comes with two Thunderbolt/USB 4 ports; some models also include two USB-C ports. You probably have devices that use USB-A, Thunderbolt 1, Thunderbolt 2, DisplayPort, HDMI, or something else. How do you connect these devices? With an adapter.

If you’re planning to buy a new 24-inch iMac, MacBook Pro, or MacBook Air, make sure you set aside a considerable amount of cash for the adapters you need. Apple doesn’t include any in the box, except for a power adapter.

Your best bet is to get a combination dock, like the Satechi Slim Aluminum Type-C Multi-Port Adapter ($60 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). It connects via USB-C, and includes a USB-C pass-through port, two USB 3.0 ports, and an HDMI port with 4K (30Hz) support. With this, you don’t have to carry around multiple adapters.

If you don’t want a dock, or you can’t find a dock with the mix of connections you need, Apple or another company probably has an adapter for you. We’ve come up with this guide to help you sort out what you need, and we link to the appropriate adapter in the online Apple Store or on Amazon.

Be sure to check the return policies; sometimes adapters from third-parties don’t work. Read user reviews whenever possible, and read the specifications to make sure the adapter can do what you need it to do.

If there’s a connection we missed, or you have advice on what adapters to buy, let us know on Twitter or Facebook.

How to connect USB-C devices

The Thunderbolt ports in the current 24-inch iMac, MacBook Pro, and MacBook Air work with USB-C devices, which have the same connector shape. If you want to use a USB-C device, you can just plug it into one of the Thunderbolt ports. No adapter necessary. Whew.

How to connect USB-A devices

USB-A is the USB connector with which you’re probably most familiar. It’s the USB connector that was on the previous MacBooks. (Terms like USB 4, USB 3 and USB 2 refer to the speed at which data travels through the connector.)

You can get a dock, like the before-mentioned Satechi. Or you can get Apple’s $19 USB-C to USB AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link.

Apple USB-C to USB Adapter

Apple

If you need to connect multiple USB-A devices, get a USB-C to USB-A hub. Anker sells a USB-C to 4-Port USB 3.0 HubEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link ($25 on Amazon) that provides four USB-A ports. 

How to connect micro B SuperSpeed devices

This connector is often used with external storage devices. You’ll need a new cable, like the $15 StarTech USB C to Micro USB CableEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link. 

The name of the cable is confusing, because it could be mistaken for micro USB. But if you check the product page on StarTech’s website, you can see a clear shot of the micro B SuperSpeed connector on the cable, which is quite different from micro USB.

How to connect an iPhone or iPad

For the iPhone and iPad, if you are still using the USB-A to Lightning (or 30-pin if you’re using an older device) cable that came with your device, you can get the USB-C to USB AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link mentioned above in the USB-A section.

Don’t want an adapter? Buy a $19 Lightning to USB-C CableEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link (1m). You can also get a 2-meter version for $29.

More recent iPhones and iPads include a USB-C to Lightning cable, and the iPad Pro includes a USB-C charging cable, so you don’t need the adapter for those devices.

How to connect the Lightning EarPods

There’s now a USB-C to Lightning adapter, thanks to the folks at Anker. It’s $25 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link.Remove non-product link This adapter has a female Lightning connector on one end, so you can plug in your Lightning earphones. The other side is a standard USB-C connector that you plug into your MacBook or 24-inch iMac.

anker usbc lightning audio

How to connect headphones with a 3.5mm headphone plug

You’re in luck. The MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, and 24-inch iMac have a 3.5mm headphone jack. Just plug it in and you’re good to go. That was easy.

macbookpro 13 tbolt3 ports

Now, say you need a second headphone jack. You can use a splitter, like the Belkin Speaker and Headphone 3.5 mm AUX Audio Cable Splitter ($5 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). The $12 Belkin RockStar 5-Jack Multi Headphone Audio SplitterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link plugs into the headphone jack and adds five jacks.

How to connect Thunderbolt 1 and Thunderbolt 2 devices

Older versions of Thunderbolt have a different connector than the Thunderbolt connector on the current MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, and 24-inch iMac. The adapter you need is Apple’s $49 Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) to Thunderbolt 2 AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link.

Thunderbolt 3 USB-C to Thunderbolt 2 Adapter

Apple

How to connect an external display

This one can eat up a chunk of your budget, because there are so many different types of display connectors. Be prepared to buy several adapters.

DisplayPort and mini DisplayPort

To connect to a DisplayPort display, you need a USB-C to DisplayPort cable or adapter. Amazon sells the Cable Matters USB-C to DisplayPort Adapter cableEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link for $18, and it supports 4K video at 60Hz.

To connect a display with mini DisplayPort, you need an adapter like the Answin USB C to Mini DisplayPort adapter ($18 on AmazonRemove product link).

HDMI

Apple offers the USB-C Digital AV Multiport AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link, a $69 device that also provides a USB-A port and a USB-C port that’s for charging only. Be warned: Apple released a new version of this adapter (model number A2119) in August 2019 that supports HDMI 2.0. The older version (model number A1621) supports HDMI 1.4. When shopping, check the model number (at an Apple store, you likely will get the new model). Apple has a support document that details the differences between the two adapters.

apple-usb-c-digital-av-multiport-adapter

Apple

If you don’t want to spend that much, you can get an adapter that’s just a USB-C to HDMI adapter, such as Anker’s USB-C to HDMI Adapter ($17 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). We really like the Nonda USB-C to HDMI Adapter ($18 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). When shopping for such adapters, look out for at least 1080p support. The Nonda adapter has 4K video support.

DVI

Cable Matters has a 6-foot USB-C to DVI Adapter ($20 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). They also sell 3-foot ($19) and 10-foot ($23) versions.

VGA

To connect a VGA display, Apple has a USB-C VGA Multiport Adapter ($66 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). In addition to a VGA to USB-C connection, it also provides a USB-A port for connecting a USB device, and a USB-C charging port to keep your laptop battery happy.

On the more affordable side but without the USB ports is the Benfei USB-C to VGA Adapter, which is available on Amazon for $13Edit non-product linkRemove non-product link. 

How to connect to ethernet

You’ll probably use Wi-Fi most of the time, but using an ethernet connection has its advantages. To connect to an ethernet network, you need an adapter like the Belkin USB-C to Gigabit Ethernet Adapter, which is available on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link for $27.

belkin usbc ethernet adapter

How to connect SD cards

If you use a DLSR or other type of stand-alone camera, it might have a way to transfer your files wirelessly. If not, you need an adapter to access the SD card, like the Cable Matters Dual Slot USB C Card Reader ($10 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link).

cable matters dual slot usb c card reader

If you have a USB-A card reader, you can try using the Apple’s $19 USB-C to USB AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link, or get a USB-C dock.

How to connect FireWire devices

If you have a FireWire to USB-A cable, you can try using Apple’s $19 USB-C to USB Adapter. If you have a device with a FireWire 1394 4-pin connector—it was commonly used on video cameras and looks like this—and you need a way to connect, you can try using a USB-A to FireWire 1394 4-pin cable ($8 on Amazon) with the Apple’s USB-C to USB Adapter.

Trying to connect FireWire 400 and 800 devices gets iffy. Apple has a Thunderbolt to FireWire AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link for $29, but it has a older Thunderbolt connector that doesn’t plug into the Thunderbolt port on a new MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, or 24-inch iMac.

apple thunderbolt to firewire adapter

Apple

You could try daisy-chaining adapters, but that’s always risky and may not work, not to mention potentially bad for the adapters. Plug the Thunderbolt to FireWire Adapter into Apple’s $49 Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) to Thunderbolt 2 AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link and then plug that into the Mac.

How to connect a printer with USB-B

Many printers nowadays have wireless support, so there’s no need for a cable. But maybe you have an older printer, or you find wireless printing unreliable. Most consumer printers have a USB-B port. It’s a squarish connector, much different from USB-A or USB-C.

You need a cable like the Cable Matters USB C Printer Cable, which has a USB-C to USB-B connection. A 1 meter cable is $7Edit non-product linkRemove non-product link; other lengths are available.

cable matters usbc usbb cable

If you already have a USB-C to USB AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link, you can take the USB-A to USB-B cable that came with your printer and plug it into the adapter. Then you plug the adapter into the laptop.

How to add a classic MagSafe power connector to the MacBook Air or MacBook Pro

The power adapter that comes with the new MacBook Pro and MacBook Air doesn’t have a breakaway MagSafe connector. MagSafe was a laptop lifesaver in instances where someone tripped over the power cable.

But you can still add a MagSafe connector. Tesha’s USB C Magnetic Charger Charging Cable  ($20 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link) is a power-only cable that has an adapter that acts like a MagSafe connector. It is available in silver or black.

Sours: https://www.macworld.com/article/229045/thunderbolt-3-adapter-m1-imac-macbook-pro-mac-mini-usb-displayport-hdmi-ethernet.html

To lightning 3 adapter thunderbolt

Apple Card Monthly Installments (ACMI) is a 0% APR payment option available to select at checkout for certain Apple products purchased at Apple Store locations, apple.com, the Apple Store app, or by calling 1-800-MY-APPLE, and is subject to credit approval and credit limit. See https://support.apple.com/kb/HT211204 for more information about eligible products. Variable APRs for Apple Card other than ACMI range from 10.99% to 21.99% based on creditworthiness. Rates as of April 1, 2020. If you choose the pay-in-full or one-time-payment option for an ACMI eligible purchase instead of choosing ACMI as the payment option at checkout, that purchase will be subject to the variable APR assigned to your Apple Card. Taxes and shipping are not included in ACMI and are subject to your card’s variable APR. See the Apple Card Customer Agreement for more information. ACMI is not available for purchases made online at the following special stores: Apple Employee Purchase Plan; participating corporate Employee Purchase Programs; Apple at Work for small businesses; Government, and Veterans and Military Purchase Programs, or on refurbished devices. iPhone activation required on iPhone purchases made at an Apple Store with one of these national carriers: AT&T, Sprint, Verizon, or T-Mobile.

* Monthly pricing is available when you select Apple Card Monthly Installments (ACMI) as payment type at checkout at Apple, and is subject to credit approval and credit limit. Financing terms vary by product. Taxes and shipping are not included in ACMI and are subject to your card’s variable APR. See the Apple Card Customer Agreement for more information. ACMI is not available for purchases made online at special storefronts. The last month’s payment for each product will be the product’s purchase price, less all other payments at the monthly payment amount.

To access and use all the features of Apple Card, you must add Apple Card to Wallet on an iPhone or iPad with the latest version of iOS or iPadOS. Update to the latest version by going to Settings > General > Software Update. Tap Download and Install.

Available for qualifying applicants in the United States.

Apple Card is issued by Goldman Sachs Bank USA, Salt Lake City Branch.

Sours: https://www.apple.com/shop/product/MQGH2AM/A/usb-c-to-lightning-cable-2-m
Teardown of Apple Thunderbolt 3 (USB‑C) Cable (0.8 m)

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