13 week old sleep schedule

13 week old sleep schedule DEFAULT

This post outlines what to expect from 3-6 months old. There are sample schedules and information on what is common for this age range.

Schedule Overview: 13 weeks (3-6 Months)

In many ways, things calm down a bit by three months old. You start to figure your baby out–likes and dislikes. You know better how your baby prefers things to be. You are getting better at reading cues and sleep is getting better.

But the thing with babies is life is ever-changing. The schedule changes as quickly as you can figure it out. That is why it is so helpful to see samples from other people and have an idea of where the benchmark is for a baby the age of your baby so you can get to the perfect schedule before it jumps away from you. I did this with the newborn weeks and today want to hit 3-6 months. If you want a look at the full first year, see my comprehensive first year overview that includes what to expect in eating, sleeping, and playing.

Week 13

Kaitlyn:

7:30–nurse
8:30–nap
10:30–nurse
11:30–nap
1:00–nurse
2:00–nap
4:00–nurse
5:00–nap
6:30–nurse
7:30–bed
10:00–nurse then bed (dreamfeed)

At this age, her night feeding was in those early morning hours, usually around 6 AM. I believe she dropped that feeding around 4 months.

 

McKenna:

8:00–eat
8:50–nap
11:00–eat
12:00–nap
2:00–eat
3:00–nap
4:30–eat
5:30–nap
6:30 or 7:00–eat then down to bed
10:00–dreamfeed

Every other night, she ate between 5:30 AM and 6:00 AM. Those days, we started at 8 AM. The other days, she at between 7:00 AM and 7:30 AM. She still slept until about 11:00 AM.

 

Brinley:

8:10–feed

9:10–nap

11:30–feed

12:20–nap

3:00–feed

3:50–nap

6:00–feed

7:00–nap

8:00–feed, then bedtime

10:15–dreamfeed

 

Week 14

McKenna

8:00 AM–eat
8:50 AM–nap
11:00 AM–eat
12:00 PM–nap
2:00 PM–eat (sometimes this was at 1:30 PM)
3:00 PM–nap
4:30 PM–eat
5:40-5:50 PM–nap
6:30 PM–sometimes woke. She is starting to usually take a shorter nap at this time of day. If she woke at 6:30, I got her and held her until starting to feed her at 7:00 PM. If she didn’t wake at 6:30, I got her up at 7:00 to eat.
7:00 PM–eat then right back to bed.
7:30 PM–in bed
10:00-10:30 PM–dreamfeed
5:30ish AM–eat from one side

 

Brinley

NOTE: There was a time change between week 13 and 14, hence the dramatic change in schedules

7:30–feed

8:30–nap

11:00–feed

12:00–nap

2:00 or 2:30–feed

3:00–nap (one hour after waking)

5:00 or 5:30–feed

6:30–nap (one hour after waking–sometimes she does one hour ten minutes here)

7:30–feed, then bedtime

9:45–dreamfeed

 

Week 15

McKenna:

It is a bit different this week since she is extending nights. I will just say she is waking at seven even though it ranged from 6:45-7:15. 7:00 is a happy medium.

7:00 AM–eat
7:50 AM–nap
10:30 AM–eat
11:30-11:35 AM–nap
1:30 PM–eat
2:35 PM–nap
4:00 or 4:30 PM–eat
5:15-5:45 PM–nap
6:30-6:45 PM–wake up
7:00 PM–eat then straight to bed
10:00 PM–dreamfeed

 

Brinley:

7:30–feed

8:30–nap

11:00–feed

12:00–nap

2:00 or 2:30–feed

3:00–nap (one hour after waking)

5:00 or 5:30–feed

6:30–nap (one hour after waking–sometimes she does one hour ten minutes here)

7:30–feed, then bedtime

9:45–dreamfeed

 

Week 16

McKenna:

5:30-6:00 AM–eat from one side
8:00 AM–wake and eat
8:50 AM–nap
11:00 AM–eat
12:00 AM–nap
2:00 PM–eat
3:00 PM–nap
4:30 PM–eat
5:45 PM–nap
7:00 PM–eat and straight to bed
10:00 PM–dreamfeed

 

Brinley:

7:30–feed

8:30–nap

11:00–feed

12:00–nap

2:00 or 2:30–feed

3:00–nap (one hour after waking)

5:00 or 5:30–feed

6:30–nap (one hour after waking–sometimes she does one hour ten minutes here)

7:30–feed, then bedtime

9:45–dreamfeed

 

Week 17 {Four Months Old}:

  • 4 Months: Baby is usually at 3 naps. If not, by 5 months baby should be at 3 naps in a day.
  • 4 Months: Baby might be ready for 10-12 hours of sleep at night. Some will not be ready for this until 6 months, and the normal range is always 10-12, so some babies might just be 10 hour a night people.
  • 4 Months: Often a rough age for sleep.
  • 4 Months: Baby will move to 4-6 feedings in a day.
  • 4 Montths: Baby might be ready for blanket time.

Kaitlyn:

7:30–nurse + solids
8:30–nap
10:30–nurse
11:30–nap
1:30–nurse + solids
2:30–nap
4:30–nurse
6:30–nurse + solids then bed
9:45–nurse the bed (dreamfeed). I was starting to move it back in preparation for dropping it.

 

McKenna:

5:30-6:00 AM–eat from one side
8:00 AM–wake and eat
8:50 AM–nap
11:00 AM–eat
12:00 AM–nap
2:00 PM–eat
3:00 PM–nap
4:30 PM–eat
5:45 PM–nap
7:00 PM–eat and straight to bed
10:00 PM–dreamfeed

 

Brinley:

7:30–feed

8:35–nap

11:30–feed

12:45–nap

2:30–feed

3:45–nap

5:00 or 5:30–feed

6:30–nap (80 minutes after waking)

7:30–feed, then bedtime

9:45–dreamfeed

Schedule Overview: 13 weeks (3-6 Months)

Week 18:

McKenna:

5:00-6:00 AM–eat from one side
8:00 AM–wake and eat
8:55 AM–nap
11:00 AM–eat
12:05 AM–nap
2:00 PM–eat
3:30 PM–nap
5:00 PM–eat
6:30 PM–nap
7:00-7:00 PM–eat and straight to bed
10:00-10:30 PM–dreamfeed

 

Brinley:

7:30–feed

8:35–nap

11:30–feed

12:45–nap

2:30 or 3:00–feed

3:45–nap (75 minutes later)

5:00 or 5:30–feed

6:30–nap (80 minutes after waking)

7:30–feed, then bedtime

9:45–dreamfeed–until it was dropped during this week

 

Week 19:

McKenna:

For this week, our day started a bit earlier than I would prefer, but late enough to make me happy 🙂

6:30-7:00 AM–nurse
55 minutes later–nap
10:00 AM–nurse (if she ate closer to 7, she will often go until 10:30)
60-65 minutes later–nap
1:00-1:30–nurse
60-90 minutes later–nap (I try to watch for cues for this nap
4:30–nurse
6:00–usually a nap
7:00–nurse then bed
10-10:30–dreamfeed (there is no real reason for my dreamfeed to be any later other than I just didn’t get around to getting her until later sometimes 😉 ).

 

Brinley:

7:30–feed

8:35–nap

11:30–feed

12:45–nap

3:00–feed

4:15–nap

5:00 or 5:30–feed

6:30–nap (80 minutes after waking) until it was dropped

7:30–feed, then bedtime

 

Week 20:

McKenna:

7:15 AM–wake and nurse
8:10 AM–nap
10:30 AM–nurse and rice
11:30 AM–nap
1:30-2:00 PM–nurse
2:40-3:10 (70-90 minutes later) PM–nap
4:40-5:00 PM–nurse and sweet potatoes
7:00-7:20 PM–nurse then straight to bed
10:30 PM–dreamfeed

 

Brinley:

7:30–feed with solids

8:45–nap

11:30–feed with solids

1:00–nap

3:30–feed

5:00–nap

5:30–feed with solids

7:30–feed, then bedtime

 

Week 21 {Five Months Old}

  • 5 Months: You might want to start teaching sign language to baby. This can be done at any point forward.
  • 5 Months: Teething can start to impact sleep.

McKenna:

7:30 AM–wake, nurse, solids (1 T rice. I will add 1 T peaches this next week)
8:30 AM–nap
11:00 OR 11:30 AM–nurse, solids (at least 4 T bananas)
12:00 OR 12:30 PM–nap
2:00 OR 2:30 PM–nurse
3:15-3:45 (75-90 minutes later) PM–nap
4:30 OR 5:00 PM–nurse and solids (2-4 T sweet potatoes)
7:00 PM–nurse and straight to bed

Sometimes she ate after only two hours in the evening since she was extending her day out. This was a temporary situation.I find that preferable to having a fourth nap and eating at a 3 hour interval, and thus having a later bedtime. I want bedtime consistent.

 

Brinley:

7:30–feed with solids–half of a banana and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in

8:45–nap

11:30–feed with solids–4 T of pears and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in

1:00–nap

3:30–feed

5:00–nap

5:30–feed with solids–half a banana mixed with 2 T oatmeal and sweet potatoes (1-2 T)

7:30–feed, then bedtime

 

Week 22

McKenna:

8:00 AM–wake her up, nurse, eat 2 T oatmeal and 2 T fruit (she doesn’t always finish this much)
9:00 AM–nap
11:30 AM–wake her up, nurse, eat 2 T veggie and 2 T fruit
12:30 PM–nap
3:00 PM–wake her up (sometimes she wakes on her own), nurse
4:30 PM–nap
5:30 PM–wake her up or she wakes up, nurse, 2 T fruit, 2-4 T veggie, 2 T oatmeal
7:30 PM–nurse then bed
10:20 PM–dreamfeed

 

Brinley:

7:30–feed with solids–half of a banana and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in

8:45–nap

11:30–feed with solids–4 T of pears and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in

1:00–nap

3:30–feed

5:00–nap

5:30–feed with solids–half a banana mixed with 2 T oatmeal and sweet potatoes (1-2 T) OR butternut squash (1-2 T)–we alternate every other day with squash and sweet potatoes.

7:30–feed, then bedtime. In bed by 8:00-8:10

 

Week 23

McKenna:

8:00 AM–wake her up, nurse, eat 2 T oatmeal and 2 T prunes. She now usually does eat all of her oatmeal. Some days, she loves her prunes. Others, she hates it.
9:00 AM–nap
11:30 AM–wake her up, nurse, eat 2-4 T veggie and 2 T bananas
12:35 PM–nap
3:00 PM–wake her up, nurse
4:30 PM–nap
5:30 PM–wake her up and she is mad to be woken up, nurse, 2 T oatmeal mixed with 1 T peaches, 2-4 T veggie
7:30 PM–nurse then bed
10:15 PM–dreamfeed

 

Brinley

7:30–feed with solids–2-4 T prunes and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in

8:45–nap

11:30–feed with solids–4 T of pears and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in and 2 T of green beans with 1 T oatmeal mixed in

1:00–nap

3:30–feed

5:00–nap

5:30–feed with solids–half a banana mixed with 2 T oatmeal and sweet potatoes (1-2 T) OR butternut squash (1-2 T)–we alternate every other day with squash and sweet potatoes.

7:30–feed, then bedtime. In bed by 8:00-8:10

 

Week 24

McKenna:

  • 8:00 AM: I wake her. Nurse. 2 T fruit (prunes or peaches) and 3 T oatmeal. This is followed by bath and then independent playtime.
  • 9:00 AM: Nap
  • 12:00 PM: I wake her (yes, she takes a 3 hour nap). Nurse. 2-4 T peas and 2-4 T of bananas. This is followed by some time with siblings and some tummy time/floor play.
  • 1:15-1:30 PM: Nap. Almost every day this week, she took this nap at my parent’s house.
  • 4:00 PM: I wake her. Nurse. 4 T yellow veggie, 2 T fruit (usually peaches), and 4 T oatmeal. This is followed by us going to our new house to work on it. I would put her in the front carrier or in the bouncer. Some days, she and I would drive to pick up food for the workers.
  • 6:00 PM: Nap. This was taken in my new neighbors master bedroom closet in her bassinet.
  • 8:00 PM: I wake her. Some nights she woke on her own. She sleeps so well! I never expected her to sleep well there. They have six kids, so you know things just get really loud sometimes. The girl can sleep. Nurse and then back to bed at home.
  • 10:20 or 10:30 PM: Dreamfeed.

 

Brinley:

7:30–feed with solids–2-4 T prunes and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in

8:45–nap

11:30–feed with solids–4 T of pears and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in and 2 T of green beans with 1 T oatmeal mixed in

1:00–nap

3:30–feed

5:00–nap

6:00–feed with solids–half a banana mixed with 2 T oatmeal OR 3-4 T applesauce mixed with 2 T oatmeal and sweet potatoes (1-2 T) OR butternut squash (1-2 T)

7:30–feed, then bedtime. In bed by 8:00-8:10

 

Week 25

McKenna:

8:00 AM–wake, nurse, eat 2-3 T prunes and 1 T peaches mixed with 3 T oatmeal (3 T dry before mixed with water).

9:00-9:10 AM–nap

12:00 PM–wake, nurse, eat about 4 T green veggie and 4-8 T banana (she will eat an entire banana. She loves them).

1:15-1:30 PM–nap

4:00 PM–wake, nurse, eat about 4 T yellow veggie and 4 T pears. I then offer 2 T oatmeal and let her eat until full. She usually doesn’t eat much oatmeal, but I offer it to see if she is still hungry.

6:00 PM–(sometimes she is tired between 5:30 and 6:00, in which case I put her down) nap

8:00 PM–wake, nurse, change into PJs, story, bed

10:15 PM–dreamfeed

 

Brinley:

7:30–feed with solids–2-4 T prunes and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in

8:45–nap

11:30–feed with solids–4 T of pears and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in and 2 T of green beans OR peas with 1 T oatmeal mixed in and some fruit

1:00–nap

3:30–feed

5:00–nap

6:00–feed with solids–half a banana mixed with 2 T oatmeal OR 3-4 T applesauce mixed with 2 T oatmeal and sweet potatoes (1-2 T) OR butternut squash (1-2 T) and some fruit

7:30–feed, then bedtime. In bed by 8:00-8:10

 

Week 26 {6 Months Old!}

  • 6 Months: Baby will likely be ready to start solid foods. Consult with your doctor.
  • 6 Months: Baby might be ready to move to two naps. Some are not ready until older. Average is 8 months.
  • 6 Months: Have 4-5 nursings in a day.
  • 6 Months: Naps will be 1.5-2.5 hours each. The third nap can be short (about 45 minutes).
  • 6 Months: Independent play will be 15-30 minutes in length once baby can sit independently.
  • 6 Months: Discipline will be needed if it hasn’t been already. Discipline means to guide and correct, not to hurt.

Kaitlyn:

I finally relinquished the dreamfeed. Kaitlyn basically started to refuse to wake up and eat, so I consented and dropped it. Her waketime had also started to extend a bit, and she started to need to go longer in the morning between feedings.

7:30–nurse + solids
8:45–nap
11:00–nurse
12:15–nap
2:00–nurse + solids
3:15–nap
5:00–nurse
7:00–nurse + solids then bed

 

McKenna:

8:00 AM–wake, nurse, eat 2-3 T prunes and 1 T peaches mixed with 3 T oatmeal
9:10 AM–nap
12:00 PM–wake, nurse, eat about 4 T green veggie and about 4 T banana
1:30 PM–nap
4:00 PM–wake, nurse, eat about 4 T yellow veggie, 4 T peaches or pears, and then 1-2 T oatmeal (sometimes she eats one bite only of oatmeal).
6:00 PM–nap
8:00 PM–wake, nurse, change into PJs, story, bed

10:10 PM–dreamfeed

 

Brinley:

7:30–feed with solids–2-4 T prunes and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in

8:45–nap

11:30–feed with solids–4 T of pears OR peaches and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in and 2 T of green beans OR peas with 1 T oatmeal mixed in and some fruit

1:00–nap

3:45–feed

5:15–nap

6:00–solids–half a banana mixed with 2 T oatmeal OR 3-4 T applesauce mixed with 2 T oatmeal and sweet potatoes (1-2 T) OR butternut squash (1-2 T) and some fruit

7:30–feed, then bedtime. In bed by 8:00-8:10

 

Week 27

McKenna:

8:15 AM–wake, nurse, eat 2-3 T prunes and 1 T peaches mixed with 3 T oatmeal
9:20 AM–nap
12:15 AM–wake, nurse, eat about 4 T green veggies and 4 T banana
2:00 PM–nap
4:30 PM–wake, nurse, eat about 4 T yellow/orange veggie, 4 T peaches or pears, and then 1-2 T oatmeal
6:00-6:30 PM–nap
7:45 PM–wake, nurse, change into PJs, story, bed
10:00 PM–dreamfeed

 

Brinley:

8:00–feed with solids–2-4 T prunes and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in–a few days we did 2 T yogurt here

9:15–nap

12:00–feed with solids–4 T of pears OR peaches and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in and 2 T of green beans OR peas with 1 T oatmeal mixed in and some fruit

1:30–nap

4:00–feed

5:30–nap

6:15–solids–half a banana mixed with 2 T oatmeal OR 3-4 T applesauce mixed with 2 T oatmeal and sweet potatoes (1-2 T) OR butternut squash (1-2 T) and some fruit

7:30–feed, then bedtime. In bed by 8:00-8:10

 

Week 28

McKenna:

8:15 AM–wake, nurse, eat 2-3 T prunes, 2 T peaches mixed with 4 T oatmeal
9:25 AM–nap (some days, she was up until 9:30, but her nap was disrupted. She would go back to sleep after talking for a few minutes, but that is unusual for her to wake and talk).
12:15 PM–wake, nurse, eat about 4 T green veggies and 4-8 T applesauce
2:00 PM–nap
4:30 PM–wake, nurse, eat about 2 T squash, 2 T carrots or sweet potatoes, 4 T bananas or pears. If she still seemed hungry, I would offer 1-2 T oatmeal
6:00-6:30 PM–nap
7:00-8:00 PM– wake
7:50-8:00 PM– eat, pjs, story, bed
10:00 PM– dreamfeed for half of the week

 

Brinley:

8:00–feed with solids–2-4 T prunes and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in–a few days we did 2 T yogurt here

9:15–nap

12:00–feed with solids–4 T of pears OR peaches and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in and 2 T of green beans OR peas with 1 T oatmeal mixed in and some fruit

1:30–nap

4:00–feed

5:30–nap

6:15–solids–half a banana mixed with 2 T oatmeal OR 3-4 T applesauce mixed with 2 T oatmeal and sweet potatoes (1-2 T) OR butternut squash (1-2 T) and some fruit

7:30–feed, then bedtime. In bed by 8:00.

 

Week 29

McKenna:

I am continuing to move things back slowly before the time change, but I can’t change her much more than she is since it would conflict with the other children too much. I am also going to stop posting how much of each food she eats. I think too many people are worrying over it :):

8:20–wake, nurse, eat (prunes or peaches and oatmeal)
9:30–nap
12:20–wake, nurse, eat (green veggie and applesauce. I was also doing avocado here, but have since stopped it. I will start again if the rash is attributed to something else)

2:00–nap
4:30–wake, nurse, eat (orange/yellow veggie, bananas or pears)
6:00–nap
7:50–wake, nurse, pjs, story, bed

 

Brinley:

8:00–feed with solids–2-4 T prunes and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in–a few days we did 2 T yogurt here

9:20–nap

12:00–feed with solids–4 T of pears OR peaches and 2 T of oatmeal mixed in and 2 T of green beans OR peas with 1 T oatmeal mixed in and some fruit

1:30–nap

4:00–feed with solids half a banana mixed with 2 T oatmeal OR 3-4 T applesauce mixed with 2 T oatmeal and sweet potatoes (2 T) OR butternut squash (2 T) and some fruit OR 2 T carrots

5:30–nap

7:30–feed, then bedtime. In bed by 8:00.

 

Related Posts/Blog Labels:

 Babywise Sample Schedules 0-12 Months

Categories Sample SchedulesSours: https://www.babywisemom.com/schedule-overview-13-weeks-3-6-months/

How much sleep does a 13-week-old baby need?

If you have a baby, chances are you spend A LOT of time thinking about their sleep habits. Are they getting enough? How much do they really need? Will they ever sleep through the night, or is that just a parenting mirage?

If you’re worried about your baby’s sleep routine, we’ve created a week-by-week guide to help you find the answers you need and develop an infant sleep schedule that works for your baby and your family. The first step to a healthy sleep pattern is a regular sleep schedule—we’ve got you covered, mama.

To help with the early months of infant sleep, we’ve put together a handy sleep schedule of how much your 13-week-old is sleeping.

How much sleep does a 13-week-old baby need?

Infants up to three months old should be getting 14-17 hours of sleep within a 24-hour period, according to the National Sleep Foundation. By three months of age, many babies will have settled into a predictable sleep routine. Your baby likely takes two to three naps during the daytime, with longer stretches of nighttime sleep compared to those early newborn weeks.

Remember, all babies are different and they all develop at their own pace—that includes sleeping, too!

“This is the stage I recommend parents start to really think about moving their baby’s bedtime up if they were on a later bedtime. You can do this by gradually adjusting their bedtime 20-25 minutes each night and adjusting the last nap of the day if needed to close that gap,” says Rachel Mitchell, founder of My Sweet Sleeper. “You may also be wondering when you can start ‘sleep training’ or teaching those independent skills. Their internal sleep clock is still forming and your baby still relies on you to help them self-regulate, but you can definitely start gradually introducing more independence by continuing to put your baby down awake, and pausing a bit longer before responding to your baby for wake-ups.”

At three months old, your baby can be placed in their crib while awake, but drowsy and ready for bed. Rocking or nursing your baby to sleep is fine, of course! If that’s what works for you, that’s what works for you. Though your baby will likely come to expect sleep assistance from you the longer you provide it.

If you’re looking to make sure your sleep routine for your 13-week-old is a solid one, here’s a sample sleep schedule of what one 24-hour period with a 13-week-old baby would look like. (Note: this is meant to be a rough guide of what you can expect your baby to do; however, this is not meant to be a strict sleep schedule to adhere to.)

13-week-old baby sleep schedule

OPTION 1: Early bedtime routine, starting at 6:15 pm, with baby asleep by 6:45 pm.

OPTION 2: Offer a nap at 6:15 pm. Wake up baby at 7 pm, with an 8:45 pm final bedtime.

What are wake windows and why are they important?

A wake window is the period of time a baby can stay awake in between naps without being overtired. Wake windows for a 13-week-old.

For a 13-week-old infant, wake windows could be as long as an hour or longer. Though they’re likely only spending seven to 10 hours awake within a 24-hour period, and they’re still too little to stay awake for that many hours in a row (and will be for a very long time)!

During your infant’s wake window, you can play with baby toys, sing to them, cuddle, work on tummy time, let them enjoy a baby mat while lying flat on their back, or have some swing time while you putz around the house. Whatever you want to do with your little one is up to you!

Sleep tips for infants

Developing a solid sleep schedule and daily routine is important for your baby and your entire family. By now, your baby likely already has one—they’re creatures of habit that way. Remember, flexibility is key for both you and your baby.

Remember, try not to keep your baby awake if they don’t want to be. An overly tired infant can have trouble settling down and falling asleep at all, even if they’re exhausted. Keeping them awake longer does not mean they’ll sleep longer (and this remains true for the duration of childhood).

  • Always place your baby on their back to sleep, not on the stomach or side. This helps to reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and Sudden Unexplained Infant Death (SUID). The American Academy of Pediatrics initiated the “Back to Sleep” movement in 1992, and rates of SIDS/SUID have decreased dramatically since.
  • Do not put anything else in the crib or bassinet. Keep plush toys, pillows, blankets, loose sheets, and bumpers out of your baby’s crib or bassinet for similar reasons as above.
  • Avoid overheating. You can dress them according to the room’s temperature. Using a sleep sack is a great sleep time addition—it keeps your baby warm, but their arms remain free to avoid overheating. You can get lighter ones for warmer weather, and fleece or flannel sacks for winter.
  • Try putting your baby down drowsy but awake. This will help them develop self-soothing tactics and get used to falling asleep on their own.
  • Use a white noise machine. Whether your house is quiet as a mouse, or you’ve got other kids running around making noise, a white noise machine can help your baby feel soothed (and possibly tune out) in their surroundings.
  • Snuggle it up. Your baby wants your cuddles as much as you want to give them—especially if they’re fussy. A calm bedtime baby means a better chance for more sleep for everyone!

1st-year-know-more, sleepless nights, wxw 113, four month sleep, week113, Products, Sleep, sleep deprivation, sleep training, baby, parenting

Sours: https://www.mother.ly/baby-sleep-schedule/four-month-old-baby-sleep-guides-schedules/13-week-sleep-schedule
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3 month old sleep schedule: Bedtime and nap schedule

While your baby’s outgrowing newborn diapers and clothes, they’re also outgrowing their newborn sleep patterns. Between 3 - 4 months, you may notice some big differences in your baby’s sleep, like increased night waking and shorter naps.

Thank the circadian rhythm (a.k.a. your internal clock) for this change; it’s undergoing a maturation process that results in additional sleep cycles for your baby, and that often translates to disrupted sleep. Don’t fret - following the right schedule can improve sleep!


IN THIS ARTICLE


How much should a 3 month old sleep?

At this age most babies need at least 15 hours of total sleep in a 24-hour period. Ideally we’ll see at least 10 hours of sleep at night, and 3 - 5 naps a day, though there’s still a lot of variation at this age. Getting enough sleep remains an important part of baby development. 

 [Note: for children who were born early, we go by their adjusted age for sleep development.]

Top sleep tip for 3 month olds

Go ahead and introduce a comfort object (or “lovey”) at this age. Even though we don’t recommend taking it into their sleep space with them yet (for safety reasons), you can use it during pre-sleep routines so your baby can start developing an attachment to it.

 Sleep fact for 3 month old babies 

Although many parents are ready for more predictability at this age, most babies still need naps based upon how long they’ve been awake for (otherwise known as wake windows), rather than set times “by the clock.”

Sample 3 month old sleep schedule

Note: Sleep needs vary by child and this chart should be viewed as an example.

Naptime schedule for 3 month old

How long should a 3 month old nap?

Ideally your 3 month old will get 4 - 5 hours of day sleep on average, broken up into 3 - 5 naps. Short naps are still developmentally appropriate at this age, so it’s common to see 30 - 45 minute naps, as well as longer 1 - 2 hour naps.

How many naps for a 3 month old?

Most 3 month olds take 3 - 5 naps per day. If your baby regularly takes longer naps, their wake windows will likely be longer, meaning they may be comfortable with just 3 naps a day.

On the other hand, if your baby only has a bunch of short catnaps all day, they could need 5 naps in order to comfortably make it to bedtime. At this age we expect babies to need a nap after 60 - 120 minutes of awake time.

Check out this sample 4-nap schedule, keeping in mind that it's just that - a sample. Your baby’s day may look quite different, which is expected and okay!

4-nap schedule

Morning rise7:00 AM
1st nap8:15 AM - 9:30 AM (1.25 hour nap) 1.25 hours of awake time before 1st nap
2nd nap11:00 AM - 12:30 PM (1.5 hour nap) 1.5 hours of awake time before 2nd nap
3rd nap2:15 PM - 3:45 (1.5 hour nap) 1.75 hours of awake time before 3rd nap
4th nap5:30 PM - 6:00 (30 minute nap) 1.75 hours of awake time before 4th nap
Get ready for bed7:30 PM
Asleep 8:00 PM 2 hours of awake time before bed

Bedtime for a 3 month old

What time should a 3 month old go to bed?

At this age, we start to see bedtimes shift earlier. Plan for bedtime to be 12 - 14 hours after waking for the day, but no earlier than 6:00 PM. That means an optimal bedtime for a baby waking around 6:00 AM will be between 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM.

Bedtime will still depend on how many naps your baby takes, and how long they can comfortably stay awake. Most 3 month olds have a wake window range that’s between 1 - 2 hours long. Babies taking fewer naps (3 - 4 per day) will generally need an earlier bedtime than babies taking 5 naps a day.

3 month old baby sleep FAQ

Q: Can a 3 month old baby sleep through the night?

A:

Most babies this age will continue to wake during the night for feedings. Consult with your pediatrician and/or lactation consultant if you have questions regarding the appropriate amount of feedings per night for your three month old.

Q: How often do 3 month old babies sleep?

A:

Typically, most babies this age have a wake window of 60 - 120 minutes, meaning they may need to sleep after just an hour of awake time. Aim for at least 15 hours of sleep during a 24-hour period (between 3 - 5 naps a day).

Q: How much nighttime sleep for a 3 month old?

A:

Target 10 - 12 hours of night sleep, including wakings for feedings.

Q: How much awake time for a 3 month old?

A:

The majority of 3 month olds need sleep after an awake period of 60 - 120 minutes, depending on the time of day. The amount of awake time tends to be shorter in the morning, and lengthens throughout the day. The last wake window is usually the longest stretch of awake time during the day, which means your baby will probably sleep best with 90 - 120 minutes of awake time in between the last nap and bedtime.

Q: How much daytime sleep for a 3 month old?

A:

Your infant’s sleep habits will still be a bit unpredictable at this age. Aim for 4 - 5 hours of day sleep over the course of 3 - 5 naps.

Q: My 3 month old’s sleep is all over the place. How do I get a more predictable schedule?

A:

If you’d like to work on regulating your baby’s schedule, the best thing you can do is to aim for a consistent morning wake-up time. Ideally the morning wake time will be within the same 30 minute window each morning. If your baby sometimes wakes at 6:00 AM, and other times sleeps in until 8:00 AM, you might feel momentary tears of joy on those later mornings, however, the variation in the waking time can lead to a lot of unpredictability when it comes to planning naps and bedtime.

Q: My 3 month old’s sleep is suddenly different. Is this a regression?

A:

Between 3 - 4 months, your baby’s circadian rhythm will mature, resulting in a change in the stages and cycles of sleep (they’ll no longer sleep like a newborn, and instead have patterns similar to an adult). This is often referred to as the “4 month sleep regression.” You can read more about pediatric sleep patterns and the 4 month sleep regression here.

Sours: https://huckleberrycare.com/blog/3-month-old-sleep-schedule-and-development
Expert secrets on how to get your baby to sleep through the night

3-Month-Old Sleep Schedule: Samples, Tips, and More

As precious and adorable as newborns are, everyone can agree that they keep some unusual hours!

Especially in the early days, every parent or caregiver knows how exhausting it can be as babies may sleep often — but for very short periods and not always when you’re desperate for them to do so.

And don’t get us started on the advice of “nap when they nap”.

But as babies progress, a sort of schedule can emerge naturally, or it can be encouraged with a little planning. If you’re wondering what a 3-month-old’s sleep schedule looks like, we’re breaking down everything you need to know to help create a little order among the newborn chaos.

How much should a 3-month-old sleep?

Most 3-month-old infants should be getting a total of . So, that means your little one should only be awake for 7 to 10 hours per 24-hour cycle.

Of course, your 3-month-old isn’t going to be awake for a full 8 hours at a time. During this stage, it’s not unusual for little ones to wake for a few hours and then sleep for a few hours, around the clock.

However, around 3 months, some babies will start to get on board with the whole days/nights thing and begin to sleep through the night for as many as 6 to 8 hours at a time — a welcome change for sleep-deprived parents.

Keep in mind that all babies are different, and each one reaches sleep milestones at their own pace. So, while one child might magically begin to sleep longer stretches at night, other babies (and their parents) might still be waking every few hours through the night.

How can you get a 3-month-old on a sleep schedule?

Most medical experts don’t recommend trying to force a baby into a sleep schedule at this age. Usually, they’ll recommend waiting until your baby is 4 or 5 months old before you begin sleep training.

That said, there are things you can do now to lay the framework for a sleep schedule as your baby gets older.

One of the most important things you can do is to create a consistent routine as much as possible. This means you should wake your baby up and put them to bed at the same times every day.

Babies crave routines, and by maintaining a standard time, you’ll help naturally adjust your baby’s internal clock to that schedule as they get older.

Also, make sure that your baby’s sleeping space is quiet, dark, cool, and calming. Likewise, put your baby to bed when they’re drowsy rather than waiting until they’re completely asleep to put them down.

Sample 3-month-old sleep schedules

There’s no one sleep schedule that all parents must follow. Keep in mind that every baby is different and while some children may nap like champs, others may not. Likewise, at 3 months, most experts warn against attempting to force a sleep schedule.

However, in general, with a 3-month-old baby with a goal of 14 to 17 hours of sleep per day, that often breaks down to 3 to 5 daytime naps that can last between 30 minutes and 2 hours.

And of course, the remaining sleep occurs at night, with some lucky parents experiencing hours long stretches of uninterrupted time as their little ones snooze. If that’s not you just yet, hang in there.

Below are two examples of a sleep schedule for a 3-month-old baby. Remember that babies aren’t robots! While some babies may consistently take predictable naps, not every baby will follow that routine.

Likewise, feeding on demand is preferable to rigidly scheduled feedings, so you’ll need to adjust your expectations to ensure that your baby is getting as much nourishment as they need depending on how their feedings go.

Sample sleep schedule with longer naps

This schedule is ideal for babies that tend to nap for consistently longer periods. Specifically, if you have a baby that sleeps roughly 60 to 90 minutes at a time.

  • 7:30 a.m.: Baby wakes up for the day and has first feeding
  • 9 a.m.: First nap of the day
  • 10 a.m.: Baby wakes up and is fed
  • 11:30 a.m.: Second nap of the day
  • 12:30 p.m.: Baby wakes up and is fed
  • 2 p.m.: Third nap of the day
  • 3:30 p.m.: Baby wakes up and is fed
  • 5 p.m.: Fourth nap of the day
  • 6 p.m.: Baby wakes up and is fed
  • 7 p.m.: Start bedtime routine
  • 7:30 p.m.: Bedtime (two to three feedings overnight)

Sample sleep schedule with shorter naps

If your little one tends to sleep for less than an hour during nap time, this might be a schedule to consider. Note that total nap times can vary from as short as 30 minutes to as much as 1 hour.

  • 7 a.m.: Baby wakes up for the day and has first feeding
  • 8 a.m.: First nap of the day
  • 8:45 a.m.: Baby wakes and is fed
  • 10:15 a.m.: Second nap of the day
  • 11 a.m.: Baby wakes and is fed
  • 12:30 p.m.: Third nap of the day
  • 1 a.m.: Baby wakes and is fed
  • 2 p.m.: Fourth nap of the day
  • 3 p.m.: Baby wakes and is fed
  • 5 p.m.: Fifth nap of the day
  • 5:30 p.m.: Baby wakes and is fed
  • 7 p.m.: Start bedtime routine
  • 7:30 p.m.: Bedtime (two to three overnight feedings)

Why doesn’t my baby sleep through the night?

Of course, every tired parent yearns for the day that their baby sleeps through the night.

While there’s no magical way to make it happen overnight, there are things that you can do that will affect how easily your baby falls asleep and whether they successfully sleep without waking until the morning.

Specifically, infant sleep experts note that consistency, sleeping environments, your interactions with your baby if they wake during the night, and nighttime feeding schedules can have a direct impact on how successfully you’re able to transition your baby into consistently sleeping through the night.

Consistency

First, consider your bedtime routine. Babies crave consistency, and having a bedtime routine can help your baby recognize that it’s time for little eyes to close.

Whether it’s a bath followed by a bedtime story or lullaby and a quiet cuddle before bed, maintaining a routine helps children understand that when certain activities occur, bedtime will quickly follow.

Sleeping environment

Likewise, consider your baby’s sleeping environment. Just as with adults, the wrong environment can make it hard for little ones to not only fall asleep but stay asleep.

  • Remove any distractions, like televisions or other screens.
  • Keep lights dimmed and noise quiet.
  • Dress them comfortably for sleep.
  • Keep the room cool.
  • Make sure that they’re fed and freshly diapered.
  • Always place your baby in a safe sleeping space, on their back.

Overnight interactions

Think about how you interact with your baby if they wake up during the night.

It’s not uncommon for babies to wake up briefly and fuss or squirm before falling back to sleep. If your first instinct is to rush in and tend to them, take a moment to pause because your nurturing instincts may backfire.

Just as with adults, a baby’s sleep cycles through the night. There are times when they’re in a light sleep stage or temporarily awake where they may fuss a bit or move around.

Often, your baby can fall back to a deeper sleep on their own. But seeing you can wake them up, and make it harder to get them back to sleep.

If they do wake completely and need you for a feeding or a diaper change, keep interactions to a minimum.

Avoid playing, turning on lights, or doing anything that would signal it’s time to wake up and be active. Keep the lights low, change their diaper or feed them, and then return them to their sleeping area.

Feeding schedules

Finally, your feeding schedules can also impact whether your child might wake up overnight. If their last feed before their bedtime is at 7 or 8 p.m., and they wake 6 hours later between 2 and 3 a.m., consider changing things up to give you a more solid block of sleep.

You can opt to wake your child at 11 p.m. for a final feeding before you go to bed instead of waiting for them to wake. With consistency, this can adjust their schedule so that you’ll both be able to sleep better overnight.

Other considerations

Even if you’re able to get your baby on a sleep schedule, some scenarios can arise that may cause changes to their sleep.

It’s not uncommon to experience sleep regression during key moments in a baby’s development such as at 4, 8, 10, and 12 months. Common causes include gaining important gross motor skills like learning to roll over, crawl, or walk, as well as mastering additional language skills.

Additionally, a sick child or life changes can also disrupt regular sleeping patterns. Things like a move, a parent returning to work, or other factors can temporarily affect sleep.

Takeaway

At 3 months into this parenting gig, as much as you may be sleep-deprived and yearning for your little one to sleep on a dependable schedule, it’s not guaranteed that it will happen.

At this stage, try to focus primarily on creating and encouraging a routine whenever possible so that as your child gets older they’re already equipped with good sleep habits.

At the same time, do what you can to ensure that you’re getting the best sleep you can so that you can enjoy spending your waking hours with your growing little one.

Sours: https://www.healthline.com/health/baby/3-month-old-sleep-schedule

Week schedule 13 old sleep

Easy Sleep Schedule for Your 3 Month Old

 

Three months after giving birth, the “newborn honeymoon phase” starts to wear off and parents become eager to settle into a predictable routine with their baby. Whether your baby is an “easy sleeper” or not, most moms and dads start craving a predictable sleep schedule for their 3 month old baby.

The majority of babies this age still need to eat at night. But, small changes to your 3 month old’s sleep schedule can help you start getting longer stretches of night sleep. And following my nap tips should help your little one start settling easier and napping better!

This article answers common parent questions about 3 month old nap schedules, wake time, and bedtime routines. And it gives you example 3 month old sleep schedules to follow. Here’s to a better night’s sleep for your family!

This post may contain affiliate links.

 

 

How many hours should my 3 month-old sleep everyday?

 

Naps & Awake Times

Awake times of 1–2 hours work best at this age. 

This means your 3 month old baby should be awake for only 1-2 hours at a time during the day. Young babies need to sleep often. So avoid the temptation to keep your baby up all day, hoping he’ll sleep better at night. This often backfires! Instead, allow your baby to nap often throughout the day.

# of naps isn’t important at 3 months old

Some 3 month olds will take three naps each day, and others might take five naps. The number of naps your baby takes is not important. What is important is making sure your baby naps frequently and for 3-5 total hours each day. 

Your baby should nap 3-5 hours everyday

Your baby may prefer one 2-hour nap in the morning and several 30-45 minute naps in the afternoon. This is perfectly fine as long as your baby is happy between sleeps, naps for 3-5 total hours each day and you’re keeping awake times around 1-2 hours.

 

Bedtime

Most babies this age naturally fall into bedtime between 7:30-9:30 pm. 

If your 3 month old’s bedtime is much later than this, see my guide on moving bedtime earlier. 

It’s important to know that your baby’s bedtime should not vary by 2 hours every night! Instead, try to keep your baby’s bedtime within a 30 minute range each night. Tight bedtimes lead to the best night sleep. For example, your baby always falls asleep between 8-8:30 pm every night. 

 

Night Sleep

Most 3 month old babies need 9-11 hours sleep at night. 

This is the total hours of night sleep. Your baby will probably need to feed 2-3 times overnight. It’s rare for a 3 month-old to sleep through the night without needing to feed. Night weaning typically happens between 6-9 months. 

 

Night Feedings

Most 3 month olds need to eat 2-3 times at night, whether breastfed or bottle fed.

If your baby wakes 4+ times at night to feed, try feeding more often during the day. This can help your baby get the majority of her calories during the day so she can sleep longer at night.

 

 

Total sleep in 24 hours

Three month old babies sleep a lot! In fact, your little one will probably sleep around 13-16 hours everyday. Track your baby’s naps and nighttime sleep on an app like Huckleberry to make sure they’re getting enough total sleep each day. You’ll be surprised by how much your baby’s sleep and mood can improve when getting enough sleep everyday.

 

RELATED: Common 3 Month-Old Sleep Problems
(& Solutions!)

 

Can I get my 3 month old sleeping 10 hours at night?

 

Definitely! Most three month old babies need around 10 hours of sleep at night. But… this sleep will be broken because your baby needs to wake at night to feed.

Most babies this age can go 4-6 hours between feeds at night. Ask your baby’s doctor how many night feeds they need.

If your 3 month old is sleeping less than nine total hours at night, make sure they’re not napping too much. Limiting your baby’s total nap hours to 4 hours can help them add more hours to night sleep. A great way to do this is to wake your baby after 1.5-2 hours for each individual nap.

 

Should my 3 month old have a bedtime routine?

 

Absolutely! The best way to set your baby up for sleeping long stretches at night is to begin a bedtime routine.

The purpose of a bedtime routine is to calm your baby in the evening, so that their body can relax and welcome sleep. Certain activities have been proven to relax babies, and when done in the right order, it sets your baby up for sleeping longer at night.

2-3 months is a great age to introduce a bedtime routine, because this is when your baby’s circadian rhythm is developing, allowing your little one to distinguish night versus day.

My Exhausted Mom’s Starter Kit walks you through the steps of setting up a peaceful bedtime routine for your baby. Click here to get it!

 

3 month old nap schedule

 

One of the best ways to help your 3 month old nap well is to wake your baby at a set time each morning. This helps naps fall into a more predictable pattern.

Please do NOT stress about naps at this age! Your 3 month baby won’t nap the same way everyday. They’re not yet ready for a by-the-clock nap schedule. Instead, the best way to help them nap is to watch awake times and make sure your baby naps often enough. 

Some naps will be long, others will be short. This is completely normal. I recommend having a few “by-the-clock events” like morning wake up time, nap #1 and bedtime. The rest of your day should be flexible and based on baby’s nap lengths.

 

Here’s an example of how I approached naps with my 3 month old baby:

Wake baby at 7 am

Nap #1- 8:30 am 

Nap #2- 1-2 hours after waking

Nap #3- 1-2 hours after waking

Nap #4- 1-2 hours after waking

I would offer a 30 minute cat nap in the late afternoon to help my baby make it to bedtime. 

If bedtime is 8:30 pm, I would always wake baby by 6:30-7 pm to keep a consistent bedtime.

 

3 month old sleep schedule

 

Here are some example 3 month old sleep schedules. At this age you should expect some inconsistency to your baby’s nap schedule. Notice if your baby prefers long naps, short naps or a combination, and try to follow the appropriate schedule below. 

What you can expect from your 3 month old’s sleep is: 

  • A set morning wake up time (yes, set your alarm!)
  • 1-2 hours awake time during the day
  • Set time to wake baby from their last nap
  • Consistent bedtime 

Loosely sticking to a schedule below should improve your baby’s sleep within a few days!

 

 

Sours: https://www.babysleepmadesimple.com/3-month-old-sleep-schedule/
How do you get your baby on a sleep schedule?

Newborn Sleep Schedules By Week, Newborn Sleep Patterns, and Tips for Better Sleep!

Newborn Schedule by WeekNewborns need 14 to 17 hours of sleep a day (8 hours during the day and 8 at night) but can’t stay awake longer than 1 to 2 hours at a time and newborn sleep patterns change rapidly. If newborns generally eat, poop, and sleep around the clock in the early days, what does a newborn’s sleep schedule look like? This post shares sample newborn sleep schedules by week, information about your newborn’s sleep patterns, and tips to help get your newborn sleeping.

You can peruse all the newborn sleep schedules by scrolling down or use the quick links below. In addition, you may also want to bookmark this page for future use or get more comprehensive sample schedules and sleep schedule guidance in our e-book, Essential Keys to Your Newborn’s Sleep.


1 Week Old Sleep Schedule, Development, and Sleep Patterns

Your newborn’s sleep patterns: A 1-week old will sleep upwards of 16-18+ hours in a day, but babies this age tend to sleep in “chunks” of 2 hours at a time and will need to eat that often. It is important to feed 1-week-old babies often to ensure proper weight gain and, if you’re breastfeeding, it helps establish your milk supply. So, even if your baby wants to sleep longer than 2 hours, you will need to wake him or her to feed. It’s very likely your baby will go right back to sleep after a feeding and diaper change quite a bit of the time. Or, at least, it might feel that way.

Another thing to keep in mind is that your baby’s “night sleep” will not be very long just yet. In fact, late bedtimes are common at these younger ages and many newborns mix up day and night. This means if they are awake at all, they are awake at night when you are sleeping and then sleep in very long stretches during the day. Understandably, you may be wishing they would sleep that long at night. If so, you will want to consider correcting your newborn’s day/night confusion if they don’t correct it themselves in the next week or so.

Your 1-week-old’s newborn sleep schedule will not be set to a clock, but rather, you should feed your baby on demand and put your baby to sleep when they show sleepy signs. Babies this age, can barely stay awake every 45 minutes, usually, and eat every two hours. Here’s a bit how your day might look but it will vary quite a bit, baby to baby as well as day to day, and some naps will likely be longer than others:

1-Week-Old Sleep Schedule
TimeActivity
7:00 AMWake and Diaper Change
7:15 AMMilk
7:45 AMNap
9:15 AMMilk and Diaper Change
9:30 AMNap (goes right back to sleep after a feeding, possibly)
11:15 AMMilk and Diaper Change
12:00 PMNap
1:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
2:00 PMNap
3:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
3:30 PMNap (goes right back to sleep after a feeding, possibly)
5:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
6:00 PMNap
7:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
8:00 PMNap
9:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
10:00 PMBedtime
11:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
1:15 AMMilk and Diaper Change
3:15 AMMilk and Diaper Change
5:15 AMMilk and Diaper Change

A newborn’s sleep patterns are a bit repetitive, but I promise things will get more interesting as your baby gets older. 😉

2 Week Old Sleep Schedule, Development, and Sleep Patterns

Your newborn’s sleep patterns: A 2-week-old doesn’t differ too much from a 1-week-old in that your baby will sleep most of the day, approximately 16 hours, on average. But, again, the sleep is broken into “chunks” where some naps will be longer than others. If your baby still has day/night confusion, you may want to start trying to keep them awake for at least 45 minutes multiple times a day and avoid naps longer than 3 hours.

If your baby will only sleep when in your arms or chest, then the days may be challenging unless you have help at home. However, if your baby is sleeping in a bedside bassinet you may have more time on your hands than you thought you would after having a baby! If that’s the case, be sure to rest up for the coming weeks. 😉 Here’s a bit how your day might look but it will vary quite a bit, baby to baby as well as day to day, and some of you newborn’s naps will likely be longer than others:

2-Week-Old Sleep Schedule
TimeActivity
7:00 AMWake and Diaper Change
7:15 AMMilk
7:45 AMNap
9:15 AMMilk and Diaper Change
9:30 AMNap (goes right back to sleep after a feeding, possibly)
11:15 AMMilk and Diaper Change
12:00 PMNap
1:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
2:00 PMNap
3:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
3:30 PMNap (goes right back to sleep after a feeding, possibly)
5:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
6:00 PMNap
7:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
8:00 PMNap
9:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
10:00 PMBedtime
11:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
1:15 AMMilk and Diaper Change
3:15 AMMilk and Diaper Change
5:15 AMMilk and Diaper Change

3 Week Old Sleep Schedule, Development, and Sleep Patterns

Your newborn’s sleep patterns: At 3 weeks old, your newborn baby may begin to stay awake a bit longer during the day up to one hour or so but still will need to sleep about 16 hours in a 24-hour period. Unfortunately, he or she may also begin to become a bit fussier, in general. This is normal as babies sometimes have a hard time adjusting to the outside world. Their central nervous system is maturing and developing.

Talk to your baby’s doctor or healthcare provider to make sure you no longer need to wake your baby to feed. If your baby is gaining weight well, your doctor may allow him or her to sleep in longer stretches during the day and at night. In addition, sometimes babies still feed frequently during the day at this age but then have at least one longer stretch at night. Although a strict newborn sleep schedule is still not common, your day may look a little something like this:

3-Week-Old Sleep Schedule
TimeActivity
7:00 AMWake and Diaper Change
7:15 AMMilk
8:00 AMNap
9:15 AMMilk and Diaper Change
9:30 AMNap (goes right back to sleep after a feeding, possibly)
11:15 AMMilk and Diaper Change
12:15 PMNap
1:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
2:15 PMNap
3:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
3:30 PMNap (goes right back to sleep after a feeding, possibly)
5:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
6:15 PMNap
7:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
8:15 PMNap
9:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
10:00 PMBedtime
1:00 AMMilk and Diaper Change
3:00 AMMilk and Diaper Change
5:00 AMMilk and Diaper Change

Again, which naps are longer will vary from baby to baby and maybe even day-to-day for the same baby.

4 Week Old Sleep Schedule / 1 Month Old Sleep Schedule, Development, and Sleep Patterns

Your newborn’s sleep patterns: At 4 weeks old / 1 month old, your newborn baby will still need ~14-16 hours of sleep per day and will likely begin staying awake a bit more during the day. Sleep schedules are still relatively loose and vary day-to-day though some babies are getting into more predictable sleep patterns.

Thankfully, some 4 week old newborns start to have one or two longer stretches of sleep at night. Talk to your baby’s doctor or healthcare provider to make sure you no longer need to wake your baby to feed. If your baby is gaining weight well, your doctor may allow him or her to sleep in longer stretches during the day and at night and it will be glorious!

For breastfed babies, they sometimes feed more frequently than formula-fed babies at this age. For example, my son was breastfed and couldn’t go longer than 2 to 2 1/2 hours during the day before he needed to eat again while some formula-fed babies start to go 3 hours between feedings. Also, cluster feeding and evening fussiness may become more common around this age. Here is a common 4 week old/1 month old sleep pattern and schedule:

4 Week Old / 1 Month Old Sleep Schedule
TimeActivity
7:00 AMWake and Diaper Change
7:15 AMMilk
8:00 AMNap
9:45 AMMilk and Diaper Change
11:00 AMNap
12:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
1:15 PMNap
2:45 PMMilk and Diaper Change
3:45 PMNap
5:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
6:15 PMNap
6:45 PMMilk (Cluster Feed)
7:45 PMMilk (Cluster Feed)
8:15 PMNap
8:45 PMMilk (Cluster Feed)
9:45 PMMilk and Diaper Change
10:00 PMBedtime
2:00 AMMilk and Diaper Change
5:00 AMMilk and Diaper Change

As you can see, you may have one fewer night feeding and longer stretches of sleep (hopefully!)

5 Week Old Sleep Schedule, Development, and Sleep Patterns

Your newborn’s sleep patterns: A 5-week-old will still need ~14-16 hours of sleep a day and can’t stay awake much longer than an hour. Some babies need more time to be able to stay awake longer, but 1 to 1 1/2 hours is typical. All babies develop at their own pace so if your baby is still sleeping almost the entire day, as long as your doctor isn’t concerned, it’s likely just fine. On the other hand, if your baby is staying awake a lot more during the day, this is also normal. In other words, newborn sleep patterns change rapidly! Your baby will begin to stay awake more and more throughout the day as they can handle more stimulation.

Newborn sleep cycles are around 30-40 minutes so if your baby is waking up mid-way through the nap, that’s why. Unfortunately, we start to see this become problematic in the coming weeks. Be sure you are still swaddling your baby to help keep them asleep. If their moro reflex wakes them during a sleep cycle, remaining swaddled can help them drift back to sleep.

Here is what a 5-week-old newborn sleep schedule may look like, but again, it could vary quite a bit and you should still be putting your baby down based on his or her sleepy cues:

5 Week Old Sleep Schedule
TimeActivity
7:00 AMWake and Diaper Change
7:15 AMMilk
8:15 AMNap
9:45 AMMilk and Diaper Change
11:15 AMNap
12:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
1:30 PMNap
2:45 PMMilk and Diaper Change
4:15 PMNap
5:15 PMMilk and Diaper Change
6:30 PMNap
7:00 PMMilk (Cluster Feed)
8:00 PMMilk (Cluster Feed)
8:15 PMNap
8:45 PMMilk (Cluster Feed)
9:45 PMMilk and Diaper Change
10:00 PMBedtime
2:00 AMMilk and Diaper Change
5:00 AMMilk and Diaper Change

6 Week Old Sleep Schedule, Development, and Sleep Patterns

Your newborn’s sleep patterns: 6 week old babies typically need ~14-16 hours of sleep a day and will likely start gravitating toward a 4-5-nap nap schedule. The first nap is typically the first to organize and lengthen to become a more predictable nap. If your baby is fussy, this is typically the age when fussiness peaks. Your baby may be going through their 6-week growth spurt and will become a lot more social. Evening fussiness is still very common at this age and bedtimes often get a bit earlier but I still recommend avoiding bedtimes that are TOO early since babies this age don’t sleep 11-12 hours just yet. We start to see newborns fight sleep around this age and the upcoming weeks.

Here’s what a 6-week-old baby sleep schedule may look like:

6-Week-Old Sleep Schedule
TimeActivity
7:00 AMWake, Diaper Change, and Milk
8:30 AMNap
10:00 AMMilk and Diaper Change
11:30 AMNap
1:00 PMMilk and Diaper Change
1:30/2:00 PMNap
4:00 PMMilk and Diaper Change
4:30 PMNap
6:30 PMNap
7:00 PMMilk and Diaper Change
8:00/8:30 PMMilk (Cluster Feed)
8:30 PMNap
9:45 PMMilk and Diaper Change
10:00 PMBedtime
2:00 AMMilk and Diaper Change
5:00 AMMilk and Diaper Change

7 Week Old Sleep Schedule, Development, and Sleep Patterns

Your newborn’s sleep patterns are emerging and possibly becoming more predictable. 7-week-old newborn will still need ~14-16 hours of sleep each day and his or her schedule will likely look very similar to a 6-week-old’s. Your baby may begin to move bedtime earlier and drop one of their cluster feedings in the evening. Evening fussiness typically is going away around this age, though if your baby needs a couple more weeks, that would be within norms, too. Don’t worry! Your baby won’t likely remain so fussy unless he or she doesn’t get the sleep he or she needs. If you have any concerns, be sure to talk to your doctor and ensure proper weight gain is occurring. Here is a common daily routine and 7 week newborn sleep schedule:

7-Week-Old Sleep Schedule
TimeActivity
7:00 AMWake, Diaper Change, and Milk
8:30 AMNap
10:00 AMMilk and Diaper Change
11:30 AMNap
1:00 PMMilk and Diaper Change
1:30/2:00 PMNap
4:00 PMMilk and Diaper Change
4:30 PMNap
6:30 PMNap
7:00 PMMilk and Diaper Change
8:30 PMMilk
9:00 PMBedtime
2:00 AMMilk and Diaper Change
5:00 AMMilk and Diaper Change

A schedule is beginning to emerge! If your baby is sleeping a single 5-hour stretch, congratulations! This is considered “sleeping through the night.” Of course, you may not be sleeping all night just yet. Some babies, especially formula-fed babies, might be sleeping in even longer stretches at night. Some babies have increased their bottle sizes during the day while others haven’t. The key is that they are eating enough in a 24-hour period. Breastfed babies may still be eating three times a night.

8 Week Old Sleep Schedule / 2 Month Old Sleep Schedule, Development, and Sleep Patterns

Your newborn’s sleep patterns: By 8 weeks old/2 months old, many babies are sleeping longer at night and we start to see earlier and earlier bedtimes as your baby lengthens nighttime sleep to 11-12 hours and they nap 3-4 hours during the day, on average. They still need ~14-16 hours of sleep in a 24-hour period. However, if your baby still has a later bedtime, that isn’t too uncommon. Until your baby is sleeping 11-12 hours at night, you really don’t want an 8 PM or earlier bedtime else you will have to start your day WAY too early! In addition, your baby may have been eating just 1-2 times a night but once they lengthen their nighttime sleep, this might mean a night feeding creeps back in, temporarily.

Some parents stop swaddling around this age because baby is rolling which can become problematic for sleep. This can lead to more night-waking and shorter naps. In addition, there is commonly an 8-week growth spurt to keep in mind.

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Here is what your 8-week-old’s schedule may look similar to:

8 Week Old/2 Month Old Sleep Schedule
TimeActivity
7:00 AMWake, Diaper Change, and Milk
8:30 AMNap
10:00 AMMilk and Diaper Change
11:00/11:30 AMNap
1:00 PMMilk and Diaper Change
1:30/2:00 PMNap
4:00 PMMilk and Diaper Change
5:00 PMNap
7:00 PMMilk and Diaper Change
7:30 PMBedtime
10:30 PMFill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AMMilk and Diaper Change

Please note: Not all babies, especially breastfed babies, can transition to just two night feedings by this age, especially if they are in bed for 12 hours. Some babies are still getting three night feedings and that would be within averages.

9 Week Old Sleep Schedule, Development, and Sleep Patterns

At 9 weeks old, your baby will need 11-12 hours of sleep at night and 3-4 hours during the day broken into 3-4 naps for a total of ~14-16 hours a day. This will be true for several more weeks. Your 9-week old’s newborn sleep schedule won’t likely look too different than your 8-week schedule. The frequency of schedule changes starts to slow down a bit as we approach 16 weeks. Here is a sample 9-week old sleep schedule, though as always, babies vary a lot:

9-Week-Old Sleep Schedule
TimeActivity
7:00 AMWake, Diaper Change, and Milk
8:30 AMNap
10:00 AMMilk and Diaper Change
11:00/11:30 AMNap
1:00 PMMilk and Diaper Change
1:30/2:00 PMNap
4:00 PMMilk and Diaper Change
5:00 PMNap
7:00 PMMilk and Diaper Change
7:30 PMBedtime
10:30 PMFill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AMMilk and Diaper Change

Please note: Not all babies, especially breastfed babies, can transition to just two night feedings by this age, especially if they are in bed 12 hours. Some babies are still getting three night feedings and that would be within averages.

10 Week Old Sleep Schedule, Development, and Sleep Patterns

Your 10-week-old baby is likely starting to move bedtime a bit earlier if they haven’t done so already. It’s even more likely he or she is in bed 11-12 hours at night, now. 10-week-olds need an average of 14-16 hours of sleep in a 24-hour period and will likely be taking 3-4 naps a day, at this point. Here is a sample 10 week old newborn sleep schedule:

10-Week-Old Sleep Schedule
TimeActivity
7:00 AMWake, Diaper Change, and Milk
8:30 AMNap
10:00 AMMilk and Diaper Change
11:30 AMNap
1:00 PMMilk and Diaper Change
2:00 PMNap
4:00 PMMilk and Diaper Change
5:00 PMNap
7:00 PMMilk and Diaper Change
7:30 PMBedtime
10:30 PMFill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AMMilk and Diaper Change

Please note: Not all babies, especially breastfed babies, can transition to just two night feedings by this age, especially if they are in bed 12 hours. Some babies are still getting three night feedings and that would be within averages.

11 Week Old Sleep Schedule, Development, and Sleep Patterns

11-week-old babies still need 11-12 hours of sleep at night and 3-4 naps, but the average total sleep tends to drop a bit at this age to ~14-15 hours. As we approach 3 months old, your baby is likely staying awake a bit more during the day and some naps may be starting to shorten. Here is what a day in the life of an 11-week-old might look like:

11-Week-Old Sleep Schedule
TimeActivity
7:00 AMWake, Diaper Change, and Milk
8:30 AMNap
10:00 AMMilk and Diaper Change
11:30 AMNap
1:00 PMMilk and Diaper Change
2:00 PMNap
4:00 PMMilk and Diaper Change
4:30 PMCatnap
6:30 PMMilk and Diaper Change
7:00 PMBedtime
10:30 PMFill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AMMilk and Diaper Change

Please note: Not all babies, especially breastfed babies, can transition to just two night feedings by this age, especially if they are in bed 12 hours. Some babies are still getting three night feedings and that would be within averages.

12 Week Old Sleep Schedule / 3 Month Old Sleep Schedule, Development, and Sleep Patterns

Your newborn’s sleep patterns have likely changed significantly from a few weeks ago. 12-week-olds (or 3-month-olds) are starting to approach the time when we start to see newborn sleep problems if you haven’t seen them up to this point. Naps sometimes get shorter and it may be harder to stick to your schedule or eat-play-sleep routine. Your baby still needs 11-12 hours of sleep at night and 3-4 hours during the day, but the total average sleep is right around 14 hours. Of course, by definition, some babies will need more and some will need less. If your baby needs less, developing a 3-month-old schedule is usually more difficult. Ideally, you’d keep your baby awake no longer than two hours at a time.

Here is what a typical 12 week old sleep schedule looks like, though not always predictable just yet:

12-Week-Old Sleep Schedule
TimeActivity
7:00 AMWake, Diaper Change, and Milk
8:45 AMNap
10:00 AMMilk
11:45 AMNap
1:00 PMMilk
2:30 PMNap
4:00 PMMilk
5:00 PMNap
7:00 PMMilk
7:30 PMBedtime
10:30 PMFill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AMMilk (formula-fed babies tend to drop this feeding around this age)

13 Week Old Sleep Schedule, Development, and Sleep Patterns

Your 13-week-old’s sleep schedule won’t be too different than a 12-week-old’s in that not much changes. Of course, as your baby gets older, he or she will be able to stay awake for progressively longer periods of time. Most babies this age will stay awake 1-2 hours at a time, with the first stretch being one of the shortest. However, not all babies this age have 4 naps. Typically, those who take longer naps will have fewer naps, so it depends on whether your baby has started developing a consistent morning nap, yet. Your baby’s central nervous system is maturing and your newborn’s sleep is organizing. Here is a sample 13-week-old’s sleep schedule:

13-Week-Old Sleep Schedule
TimeActivity
7:00 AMWake, Diaper Change, and Milk
8:45 AMNap
10:00 AMMilk
11:45 AMNap
1:00 PMMilk
2:30 PMNap
4:00 PMMilk
5:00 PMNap
7:00 PMMilk
7:30 PMBedtime
10:30 PMFill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AMMilk (formula-fed babies don’t always need this feeding)

14 Week Old Sleep Schedule, Development, and Sleep Patterns

At 14 weeks old, your baby still needs 11-12 hours of sleep at night and 3-4 hours during the day. Some babies are transitioning to 3 naps around this age, though not all, depending on how long they can stay awake between sleep periods. Most babies still need to sleep within 1-2 hours of being awake. And, if they are sleeping 12 hours at night, they may not need quite as much sleep during the day. Schedules are still coming together except for regular or predictable babies who naturally gravitate toward a schedule. Here is what your schedule might look like if your baby takes a longer midday nap:

14-Week-Old Sleep Schedule
TimeActivity
7:00 AMWake, Diaper Change, and Milk
9:00 AMNap
10:00 AMMilk
12:00 PMNap
1:00 PMMilk
4:00 PMMilk
4:30 PMCatnap
6:45 PMMilk
7:00 PMBedtime
10:30 PMFill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AMMilk (formula-fed babies don’t always need this feeding)

15 Week Old Sleep Schedule, Development, and Sleep Patterns

Your 15-week-old will not sleep too differently than 14 weeks old. While not too much changes week-to-week, babies change a lot from week 1 to 16. Most importantly, keep in mind that all babies develop at a different pace. For instance, a 15-week old could look more like a 12-week-old or a 16-week-old and both would be “normal.” Not all babies will organize their sleep at the exact same time. Babies tend to be more predictable after they transition from 3 to 2 naps, but other nap transitions and schedule changes aren’t quite as predictable. Here is what some 15-week-old’s schedule looks like if they can’t stay awake very long between sleep periods and don’t take super long naps:

15-Week-Old Sleep Schedule
TimeActivity
7:00 AMWake, Diaper Change, and Milk
9:00 AMNap
10:00 AMMilk
12:00 PMNap
1:00 PMMilk
3:00 PMCatnap
4:00 PMMilk
5:00 PMCatnap
7:15 PMMilk
7:30 PMBedtime
10:30 PMFill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AMMilk (formula-fed babies don’t always need this feeding)

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16 Week Old Sleep Schedule / 4 Month Old Sleep Schedule, Development, and Sleep Patterns

16 weeks is the last that we consider a “newborn.” Your baby should be awake a lot more during the day and developing some personality! By this age, I knew my son was very spirited and persistent, and I had challenges in my future! He did end up inspiring an entire website after all. 😉

At 16 weeks old or 4 months, the main sleep problem we see is the famous 4 Month Sleep Regression. Babies tend to wake up frequently at night and take short naps after this regression begins. However, keep in mind that this can occur as early as 12 weeks old or as late as 5 months old. Some babies will go back to sleeping well while others will need more help learning how to sleep in longer stretches at night and take longer naps.

If you haven’t already, this is often when visitors download our free e-Book, 5 Ways to Help Your Child Sleep Through the Night or consider sleep training.

Here is what a sleep schedule for your 16 week old might look like:

16-Week-Old Sleep Schedule
TimeActivity
7:00 AMWake, Diaper Change, and Milk
9:00 AMNap
10:00 AMMilk
12:00 PMNap
1:00 PMMilk
4:00 PMMilk
4:30 PMCatnap
6:45 PMMilk
7:00 PMBedtime
10:30 PMFill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AMMilk (formula-fed babies don’t always need this feeding)

I hope this post gives you some ideas about an appropriate newborn sleep schedule for your baby and about your baby’s sleep patterns. But, keep in mind that all babies are unique and some are more predictable and easy-going than others. Spirited babies tend to be more challenging when it comes to sleep schedules. Take heart that all babies do eventually get into a rhythm, though not all are predictable to the clock. You’ll get to know your baby and his or her unique needs.

What is your newborn’s sleep schedule?

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I put my passport in my pocket. - And what are you doing here, young lady, in such a strange place. Are you a road whore. The woman looks around convulsively, as if for the first time realizing where she is. You can clearly see how she trembles.



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