Split rail corner fence ideas

Split rail corner fence ideas DEFAULT

20+ Corner Fence Ideas (with Photos)

The corners of your yard are often the most overlooked and underutilized spaces. If you’re looking to dress them up a bit, considering decorating with a corner fence. Corner fences are a wonderful way to add some visual interest to your front yard, backyard, or garden space. They are also typically very easy to install, offering instant results and an immediate boost in curb appeal for your home.

Corner fences are often seen framing gardens or marking the entrance to driveways. However, there are a number of different ways you can use and decorate L-shaped accent fences. With that said, let’s take a look at some clever ways to use a corner fence on your property, as well as some corner fence ideas to inspire your next home improvement venture.

Table of Contents

Six Unique Ways to Use Corner Fences

While fences are primarily used as barriers, this isn’t always the case with corner fences. Here are some unique ways that you can use corner fences in your yard:

1. Partially Enclose an Outdoor Shower

If you have a lake house or a pool, you may want to construct an outdoor shower. An easy way to partially enclose the shower is by using a corner privacy fence. For best results, opt for a fence made from vinyl, as this material is resistant to warping, rotting, expanding, contracting, and other damage from exposure to moisture. Adding a corner fence to your outdoor shower will offer some privacy, while also keeping the water contained. Vinyl is also incredibly easy to maintain and won’t get damaged from the water.

2. Hide Eyesores

Garbage cans, utility boxes, pool equipment, propane tanks, and other unattractive items on your property are very unsightly to look at. They distract from your home’s exterior and take away from its visual appeal. In this case, a corner fence is an excellent solution. Consider using a corner privacy fence to conceal those undesirable visual disturbances.

3. Create an Outdoor Nook

If your patio is an uninteresting expanse of concrete, you can break it up by designing an adorable, relaxing space. Transform one of the corners by using a corner accent fence, including elements to make the nook visually pleasing and inviting. You can add potted plants, vining plants, fairy lights, and even a comfortable chair and small table. Once everything is set, all you need is a good book and your favorite beverage.

Using a corner fence to create an outdoor nook is a wonderful way to transform your outdoor living area and give it a cozier, more welcoming ambiance.

4. Establish Boundaries

If you have an area on your property that is difficult to distinguish from the rest of your outdoor space, consider using a corner fence. For example, if you have a soccer field on your property and don’t want to construct an entire fence, strategically placing corner fences will let visitors know where the soccer field starts and ends.

5. Mark Property Line

Corner accent fences are a subtle, neighbor-friendly way to establish the corners of your property line. They also provide a charming backdrop for plants or flowers. Opting for a corner fence instead of a full barrier fence is the ideal choice for those who want something that marks their property line, but doesn’t completely obstruct the view of their home. This is often the most popular application among homeowners for corner fences.

6. Dampen a Noisy Air Conditioner

If your air conditioning unit is positioned near your deck or patio, when it’s on, it may make too much noise and prevent you from enjoying your outdoor living space. In this case, you can use a corner fence to help with the noise. While the fence won’t block out the sound entirely, it will dampen it quite a bit. As an added bonus, the corner fence will conceal the air conditioner from sight so you don’t have an eyesore visible right off of your deck or patio.

Corner Fence Materials

One important consideration when you’re planning to construct a corner fence on your property is the material. Corner fences can be bought pre-built or you can construct them yourself and they are available in much of the same materials as traditional fences. Here are some of the most common options for corner fence materials:

1. Wood Corner Fences

One of the most popular materials used for corner fences is wood. Solid wood is a versatile option and is graded on quality based on its appearance. The highest-grade wood types are referred to as clear, followed by premium, select, standard, and quality. When compared to other alternatives, lumber has a lower upfront cost, is easier to stain and seal, and retains finish very well.

There are a number of wood species to choose from and, oftentimes, it’s easiest to choose a wood type that is popular for your region. Cedar is among the best options, as it is notorious for its long-lasting good appearance. It is also naturally resistant to insects and decay. Though, cedar will eventually start to rot over time. Redwood and teak woods are another option, desired for their natural luster and softness.

Like cedar, redwood and teak are naturally resistant to insects, decay, warping, and shrinking. However, these woods require a sealer to maintain their original color and tend to be very expensive. As such, they are usually only reserved for small areas – like a corner fence! Chemically- or pressure-treated wood, on the other hand, is often a popular pick for outdoor applications. They are the ideal choice for fence posts, but do have a tendency to start twisting and warping about a month after installation.

To avoid these issues, go to your local home improvement center and handpick the wood planks. Opt for the straightest ones possible and avoid any that have a green hue or are damp.

2. Vinyl Corner Fences

An alternative to wood fencing, vinyl is an excellent choice for those looking for a maintenance-free corner fence. Vinyl fencing is plastic-based, durable, comes in a wide range of finishes, styles, and heights, and are very easy to hose down when they get dirty. In terms of quality, the thicker the gauge, the better it will look for longer.

Oftentimes, you’ll find manufacturers that offer a lifetime warranty for their vinyl fencing products. Unlike wood, vinyl never needs to be painted or stained. While the upfront cost is more than wood, the long-term benefits that vinyl offers make it a promising material for corner fences.

For optimal results, it’s important that the installation is done properly. Therefore, it’s highly recommended to hire a professional to install your vinyl corner fence instead of opting to do it yourself. If the fence ends up being slightly out-of-plumb, it will be considerably noticeable in the finished product. However, some manufacturers offer pre-assembled panels and easy-to-install kits. In this case, if you have some experience, you may be able to take on your corner fence as a DIY project.

3. Metal Corner Fences

From classic to contemporary, there are many different styles of metal corner fencing to choose from that can either match or blend in with the exterior of your home. Wrought iron corner fences (pictured above) are a popular choice that has survived hundreds of years of style changes. Aside from being very classic, wrought iron is incredibly durable.

If you want to have a wrought iron corner fence installed, consider hiring a professional fencing contractor. Oftentimes, these traditional metal fences are custom designed and built to fit the property and can even feature more elaborate patterns. For something that is a little less expensive and labor-intensive, you can choose from steel, aluminum, and cast-iron fences. These types of metal offer the same strength as wrought iron, but with a more DIY-friendly installation.

Like vinyl, metal fences are low maintenance and won’t fade or discolor over time. There are also distinct advantages and disadvantages associated with the different metals. For example, aluminum is a lightweight material that allows for easy installation but is susceptible to bending and scratches. Steel, on the other hand, is one of the best and strongest materials you can get for a fence. Though, its strength makes it very heavy, difficult to transport, and challenging to install.

4. Composite Corner Fences

Composite fences are a man-made option, consisting of wood fibers that are held together with plastic polymers. It is designed to look like wood, but comes without many of the common disadvantages associated with the real thing. Composite fencing is not susceptible to the elements, meaning it won’t expand, contract, warp, rot, or attract insects.

In terms of both material and installation, composite corner fences tend to run slightly more expensive than both vinyl and real wood. It also requires precise installation done by professionals. While the upfront costs may be more, this type of fencing is built to withstand the test of time and will save you money on repairs and replacements down the line.

After your composite corner fence has been installed, you will enjoy very low maintenance. All it requires is the occasional spraying with the hose to keep it looking fresh and clean for years to come. This corner fencing material is the ideal choice for those who want the look of wood, but without all the disadvantages that comes with it.

Corner Fence Ideas

Now that you have a greater understanding of some of the ways you can utilize a corner fence and the materials you have to choose from, let’s take a look at some corner fence ideas to inspire your next project!

Simple Split Rail Corner Fence

Something as simple as a split rail corner fence may be all your property needs to add a touch of rustic charm. These types of corner fences are very inexpensive, as all it requires is a few pieces of lumber. They are also easy to install and don’t require the assistance of professional, A split rail corner fence can be kept pretty basic and functional or you can dress it up by planting some colorful flowers on either side.

Whimsical Cinder Block Corner Fence Planter

Do you want to create an appealing corner fence but you’re on a tight budget? Consider using cinder blocks! Not only are cinder blocks readily available and relatively inexpensive to purchase they can serve a dual purpose as both a corner fence and a planter. Stack the cinder blocks as desired, fill the holes with dirt and plant succulents, flowers, or other plants to create a whimsical nook in the corner of your garden or yard.

Elevated Picket Corner Fence

This corner garden picket fence will add decorative appeal to any garden space. Made from vinyl, the fence is resistant to the elements and very easy to keep clean. The picket design is classic, ideal for defining corners and establishing edges around your yard, landscape, or garden. Its elevated nature, paired with a large bush, helps to add a little touch of privacy as well. This particular corner fence is available from Wayfair and offers quick and easy installation.

Rustic Split Rail Corner Fence

Split rail fences are an incredibly popular choice for corner fences. To create a rustic look in your yard, build your corner fence out of weathered or repurposed wood. Then, plant a variety of colorful wildflowers to add a creative, cottage-style feel. This corner fence idea is perfect for farmhouses, cottages, or any rural homes.

Tiered Garden

A corner fence is a perfect spot to design a tiered garden. Above, the homeowner created retaining walls out of bricks in three layers. Then, in the spaces between the layers of bricks they planted flowers and plants in varying bright, colorful hues. This is an excellent corner fence idea for making the most out of a tight space.

End of Driveway Accent Fence

Installing corner fences at either end of a driveway is a popular way to use these structures among homeowners. The type, material, and style of fencing that you use ultimately comes down to your design preferences, though split rail is very common. This homeowner planted small shrubs on either side of their corner fence to dress up an otherwise plain design. They also added a freestanding house number sign so that it is visible from the road.

Curved Driveway Entrance Fence

An interesting take on the driveway entrance corner fence, this fencing is curved in the opposite direction. Mulch was laid down in front of the fence and brick edging was placed where it meets the asphalt. This fence idea serves as an inviting piece for the end of the driveway, while also complimenting the white exterior of the home. Meanwhile, bright yellow flowers were planted to infuse a bit of extra cheeriness to the landscape.

White Picket Border Fence

Add instant landscaping to your property with an easy-to-install corner picket fence. Available on Amazon, this product is made out of vinyl, is virtually maintenance-free, and comes with a 10-year warranty. The benefit of buying a pre-built corner fence like this is that you can install it without having to dig holes, tear up your yard, or pour concrete. This corner fence is a traditional accent piece that can subtly define borders in your garden or yard.

Corner Privacy Screen

Corner fences can also be used as privacy screens, provided that they are tall enough and are not easy to see through. In this case, a tall wooden fence was constructed to conceal a lovely corner seating area. The homeowner decorated the space even further with some planters on the side, hanging lanterns, and colorful pillows. This corner fence idea offers the ideal spot for backyard relaxing in privacy.

Corner Fence Fairy Garden

Another idea for corner fence landscaping is to transform the space into a magical fairy garden right in your backyard. This is an imaginative way to add some fun, visual interest to an unappealing corner of your property. To make your own fairy garden, you’re going to need a variety of plants. Opt for interesting shapes, colors, and textures to create that whimsical look.

You also want to have a ton of accessories – from tiny benches and small mushroom stools to fairy lights, miniature houses, and more. You can make your own pieces or purchase them from an online retailer. For best results when designing your fairy garden, make sure you narrow down a specific theme. That way, you know exactly what type of plants and accessories to get.

Final Thoughts

There are countless ways that you can use and decorate a corner fence. From a classic white picket fence adorned with colorful blooms that adds visual appeal to the end of your driveway to a simple and functional split rail corner fence that marks your property lines, the options are endless! Regardless of what style you end up going for, make sure that you choose a material that is going to suit your needs best and stand up to the weather conditions in your particular area of the world.

Jessica Stone

Jessica considers herself a home improvement and design enthusiast. She grew up surrounded by constant home improvement projects and owes most of what she knows to helping her dad renovate her childhood home. Being a Los Angeles resident, Jessica spends a lot of her time looking for her next DIY project and sharing her love for home design.

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The split rail, or post and rail, fence is essentially a rustic version of a post and board fence style and is similarly a good choice for a decorative accent, for delineating areas, or for marking boundaries without creating a solid visual barrier. Typically made from split cedar logs, the fence materials have naturally random shaping and dimensions, with imperfect details and character marks that give the wood an appealing hand-hewn look. natural weathering of the untreated wood only enhances the fence’s rustic beauty.

The construction of a split rail fence couldn’t be simpler. The posts have holes or notches (called mortises) cut into one or two facets. The fence rails have trimmed ends (called tenons) that fit into the mortises. No fasteners are needed. Posts come in three types to accommodate any basic configuration: common posts have through mortises, end posts have half-depth mortises on one facet, and corner posts have half-depth mortises on two adjacent facets. The two standard fence styles are two-rail, which stand about three feet tall, and three-rail, which stand about four feet tall. rails are commonly available in eight- and ten-feet lengths.

In keeping with the rustic simplicity of the fence design, split rail fences are typically installed by setting the posts with tamped soil and gravel instead of concrete footings (frost heave is generally not a concern with this fence, since the joints allow for plenty of movement). This comes with a few advantages: the postholes are relatively small, you save the expense of concrete, and it’s much easier to replace a post if necessary. plan to bury about a third of the total post length (or 24 inches minimum). This means a three-foot-tall fence should have 60-inch long posts. If you can’t find long posts at your local home center, try a lumberyard or fencing supplier.

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Gallery featuring images of 28 split rail fence ideas for residential homes, a selection of beautiful, rustic fences that don't cost a fortune.

Beautiful colorful Autumn scene with split rail fence and Fall colors

Welcome to our guide on split rail fences!

You can call them split rail, zigzag, worm, or snake fences, but the fact remains that these lovely rustic fences are the perfect decorative border for country, cottage, cabin, or rustic homes!

Split rail fences are constructed out of timber logs, typically split in half lengthwise to form the rails. There are two different forms, which have a dramatically different appearance.

Traditional free-standing split rail fences, usually seen used for agricultural or decorative fencing, have a characteristic zig-zagging structure. These can be built without nails or other hardware, and are popular in areas with rocky soil where it’s nearly impossible to dig post holes.

Mortised fences are the other most popular form of split rail fence, where instead of layering split rails in a triangular, zig-zagging pattern, the split rails are placed into notched posts. These are increasingly popular in the UK and suburban areas of the United States.

Mortised fences use less wood, and are thereby less expensive than traditional freestanding split rail fences.

So why choose a split rail fence over any other kind of fences?

Pros:

  1. Visibility – you can easily see what’s going on beyond your property borders. Great for well-behaved pets who like to keep an eye on things.
  2. Durable – when constructed out of hardwoods, your fence will hold up against rot and wear from weather.
  3. Attractive – even when aged, the hardwood will continue to have a certain rustic charm.
  4. Easy to Repair – split rail fences are easy to assemble and dissemble, meaning you can easily replace any sections that need to be.
  5. Cleaning – split rail fences are fairly simple to clean. Use a pressure washer with a special treatment product to kill mold.

Cons:

  1. Privacy – split rail fencing is often very loose and open, so if you’re looking to keep small pets or children in, you might need a different option, unless you’re willing to add a mesh fence just beyond it.
  2. Price – while simple to put together, the lumber is rather heavy, so there will be a lot of manual labor put in. Installation can be expensive, as can the best hardwoods.

The price of your split rail fence will vary widely depending on the quality of wood you use. Expect to pay $10-$15 per foot for the standard Cedar wood split rail fence, $10-$18 per foot for a medium quality Yellow Pine fence, $20-$30 per foot for a high-quality Locust wood fence, and $19-$23 per foot for a top-quality composite fence. (Source: Home Fence Solutions)

At some home improvement stores, you can expect to pay as little as $8.97 per rail for 11 foot pressure-treated pine split rails. (Source: Home Depot)

The best news is for DIY lovers. Approximately a quarter of the cost of adding a split rail fence is installation, so DIYers can save a ton of money installing the fence themselves. (Source: Fence Guides)

We hope you’ll find the inspiration you’ll need to start working on your very own split rail fence, but if you think you’d prefer a different style, check out our definitive guide to fencing!

This is a beautiful example of a rough hewn mortised fence in front of a planting bed filled with thick, colorful small blooming plants. The planting bed is edged with a brick scalloped edging, giving it a finished look.

This is a beautiful example of a rough hewn mortised fence in front of a planting bed filled with thick, colorful small blooming plants. The planting bed is edged with a brick scalloped edging, giving it a finished look.

A more traditional split rail fence with the characteristic zig-zagging silhouette. This is a more common agricultural fence, seen here marking the boundary of a bright green meadow with lovely lavender thistle.

A more traditional split rail fence with the characteristic zig-zagging silhouette. This is a more common agricultural fence, seen here marking the boundary of a bright green meadow with lovely lavender thistle.

Another mortised fence in the standard red-orange cedar. Cedar is a beautiful option, as it turns silver as it ages. Split rail fences are, on average, more attractive than other types of wood fencing as they age.

Another mortised fence in the standard red-orange cedar. Cedar is a beautiful option, as it turns silver as it ages. Split rail fences are, on average, more attractive than other types of wood fencing as they age.

A painted white mortised fence, one of the more popular designs for homes in the suburban United States. This type has a more polished look than traditional rough hewn split rail fences, but still has a decidedly country style to it.

A painted white mortised fence, one of the more popular designs for homes in the suburban United States. This type has a more polished look than traditional rough hewn split rail fences, but still has a decidedly country style to it.

Source: Zillow Digs™

A much more rustic split rail fence with diagonal supports. This technique is used in windy areas to further support the already sturdy and freestanding fence.

A much more rustic split rail fence with diagonal supports. This technique is used in windy areas to further support the already sturdy and freestanding fence.

An aged split rail fence in a grassy field with fall maples in the background. A few of the rails have been replaced with discarded branches, giving the fence a very rustic look. The fence itself is aged well, taking on a silvery color.

An aged split rail fence in a grassy field with fall maples in the background. A few of the rails have been replaced with discarded branches, giving the fence a very rustic look. The fence itself is aged well, taking on a silvery color.

This traditional split rail fence is built to last, with thick logs used to form the structure. Here and there, diagonal supports are added for extra sturdiness. This type of fence is popular in areas where large, sturdy trees like pine are plentiful.

This traditional split rail fence is built to last, with thick logs used to form the structure. Here and there, diagonal supports are added for extra sturdiness. This type of fence is popular in areas where large, sturdy trees like pine are plentiful.

A lovely cedar mortised fence that descends into the cobblestone path up the hill to the house. This fence marks the property's extensive boundary with the street.

A lovely cedar mortised fence that descends into the cobblestone path up the hill to the house. This fence marks the property’s extensive boundary with the street.

Source: Zillow Digs™

This is a unique take on the mortised fence, using rounded logs instead of split logs. It makes for a more log cabin feel, a more formidable fence.

This is a unique take on the mortised fence, using rounded logs instead of split logs. It makes for a more log cabin feel, a more formidable fence.

A rustic split rail fence used to separate different sections of a large planting bed. In this case, the fence is used mostly for decorative purposes.

A rustic split rail fence used to separate different sections of a large planting bed. In this case, the fence is used mostly for decorative purposes.

Another decorative fence that follows the curve of a lovely, colorful planting bed. At the tip of the fence is a large barrel planter filled with grasses and bold magenta blooms.

Another decorative fence that follows the curve of a lovely, colorful planting bed. At the tip of the fence is a large barrel planter filled with grasses and bold magenta blooms.

A simple farmhouse with low maintenance landscaping including a well aged split rail fence no more than 3 feet high.

A simple farmhouse with low maintenance landscaping including a well aged split rail fence no more than 3 feet high.

Source: Zillow Digs™

Beautiful rustic aged split rail fence with narrowing rails running through a lovely garden rife with Black Eyed Susans and Lavender.

Beautiful rustic aged split rail fence with narrowing rails running through a lovely garden rife with Black Eyed Susans and Lavender.

An aged rustic traditional split rail fence marking the boundary of this cabin on a heavily wooded lot. The tin roof of the cabin gives it a decidedly rustic look.

An aged rustic traditional split rail fence marking the boundary of this cabin on a heavily wooded lot. The tin roof of the cabin gives it a decidedly rustic look.

Another lovely wooden cabin-like structure with a low metal roof. A split rail fence runs along this home's garden, which is rich in color and texture, including small ground cover perennials and tall, bold sunflowers.

Another lovely wooden cabin-like structure with a low metal roof. A split rail fence runs along this home’s garden, which is rich in color and texture, including small ground cover perennials and tall, bold sunflowers.

A beautiful, shady backyard with a large central bark planting bed running along the center. Along the back of the property is a split rail fence, which marks the boundary without obscuring the view of the woods and hills beyond.

A beautiful, shady backyard with a large central bark planting bed running along the center. Along the back of the property is a split rail fence, which marks the boundary without obscuring the view of the woods and hills beyond.

Source: Zillow Digs™

A lovely aged split rail fence with thick irises, shrubs, and flowering trees in bold, beautiful colors.

A lovely aged split rail fence with thick irises, shrubs, and flowering trees in bold, beautiful colors.

An old farmhouse with a sturdy split rail fence meant to corral horses. The aged fence fits perfectly into the Old West atmosphere of the farmhouse and surrounding prope

An old farmhouse with a sturdy split rail fence meant to corral horses. The aged fence fits perfectly into the Old West atmosphere of the farmhouse and surrounding property.

A tall, rustic split rail fence with a light coating of soft green moss growing over the ragged limbs. To either side of the fence are lengthy planting beds filled with daffodils and other spring flowers.

A tall, rustic split rail fence with a light coating of soft green moss growing over the ragged limbs. To either side of the fence are lengthy planting beds filled with daffodils and other spring flowers.

As decorative fences, split rails look fantastic in colorful gardens, where they provide contrast to the bright color of flowers, but still reinforce boundaries for children and pets (and neighbors!)

As decorative fences, split rails look fantastic in colorful gardens, where they provide contrast to the bright color of flowers, but still reinforce boundaries for children and pets (and neighbors!)

Another rustic mortised fence with lovely rounded beams, creating a barrier between a field of sunflowers and a meadow.

Another rustic mortised fence with lovely rounded beams, creating a barrier between a field of sunflowers and a meadow.

A beautiful cedar mortised fence that descends into a bark-filled planting bed punctuated with lovely yellow daffodils.

A beautiful cedar mortised fence that descends into a bark-filled planting bed punctuated with lovely yellow daffodils.

A beautiful stone building with tall trees and a horse pasture enclosed by a series of sturdy split rail mortised fences.

Rustic Landscape by West Chester Architects & Building DesignersArcher & Buchanan Architecture, Ltd.

A beautiful stone building with tall trees and a horse pasture enclosed by a series of sturdy split rail mortised fences.

An enclosed backyard viewed from above showing the pool complex, including several patio areas, a garden, and a pool house. The area is enclosed by a large, sturdy mortised fence.

Traditional Pool by Philadelphia Landscape Architects & Landscape DesignersLandscape Design Group Inc.

An enclosed backyard viewed from above showing the pool complex, including several patio areas, a garden, and a pool house. The area is enclosed by a large, sturdy mortised fence.

A view of a split rail fence marking the border of the home's property meeting the woods. The lovely natural fence does not detract from the impressive swimming pool with three cascading waterfalls.

Traditional Pool by Catonsville Landscape Architects & Landscape DesignersPlusen Landscape Architects

A view of a split rail fence marking the border of the home’s property meeting the woods. The lovely natural fence does not detract from the impressive swimming pool with three cascading waterfalls.

A beautiful old stone townhouse with a double row of fences; a split rail to connect the sturdy gate to, and a slightly taller hedge for privacy.

Traditional Exterior by Far Hills Interior Designers & DecoratorsMatthew Frederick – M. Frederick L.L.C.

A beautiful old stone townhouse with a double row of fences; a split rail to connect the sturdy gate to, and a slightly taller hedge for privacy.

A rustic split rail fence on a foggy day across from a pergola and several ornamental trees and shrubs.

Traditional Landscape by Wilton PhotographersMichael Biondo Photography

A rustic split rail fence on a foggy day across from a pergola and several ornamental trees and shrubs.

A beautiful farmhouse with a silo framed by a rustic split rail fence, a wealth of wildflowers, and a flagstone path leading up to it.

Rustic Landscape by Knoxville Architects & Building DesignersMossCreek

A beautiful farmhouse with a silo framed by a rustic split rail fence, a wealth of wildflowers, and a flagstone path leading up to it.

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