Kpop cafe events near me

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[Feature] Goodies and give outs, how K-pop birthdays are celebrated

Fans show their affection by dedicating a purple birthday cake with blue, orange and violet candles on top. (Kweon Ha-bin/The Korea Herald)

Fans show their affection by dedicating a purple birthday cake with blue, orange and violet candles on top. (Kweon Ha-bin/The Korea Herald)


Signboards welcoming bypassers for a cup of joe, the scent of a fresh bag of coffee beans, little nooks for a sip and music playing in the background are no different from an ordinary cafe.

But cafe buffs would see a minor tweak to the definition once stepping inside the venue.

Birthday cafes

Kim Na-young’s dream was to run a cafe business with her older sister. Although the two are nine years apart, they share similar tastes and hobbies. And after years of talking about living out their childhood dream, the sibling’s entrepreneurial venture came to reality by opening a coffee shop in Yangjae, southern Seoul, three months ago.

Kim and her sister often found themselves hopping on various birthday cafe tours during their favorite celebrities’ birthdays. “My sister and I talked about how we were open to hosting idol-related events if we had a cafe. And when we decided to open one, we quickly set the birthday cafe event in motion,” Kim told The Korea Herald.

The year-old said zealous K-pop devotees had breathed new life into the fandom culture when the “cafe event” was introduced. Kim said the cafe is frequented and easily accessible by different age groups, including fans, so the fandom craze was not new.

The young owner said the cafe events and themes focus on global sensation BTS because the siblings are into the band.

Although the coffee shop usually greets coffee aficionados, Kim labeled her cafe as an “event-theme-based cafe,” referring to the special occasions the store has held since it opened its doors. She added that the grounds are open to regular customers during celebrations, and other fandoms are also welcome to organize events.

Unfamiliar becomes convention

The K-pop fandom revolves around the concept of “deokjil,” which translates into being actively obsessed over one’s favorite idol. The term is what drives various aspects of the K-pop idol fan culture: watching videos uploaded on various social media accounts, going to meet-and-greets and concerts, writing fan fiction and so on.

Years ago, avid music fans dedicated their time and money to celebrate their favorite singers’ birthdays in subway advertisements, on the sides of buses or sometimes even on high-rise billboards. But now, groups of individuals or fans often meet their singers at cafes on the special day.

The idea is simple. A group of fans or fans who work as amateur photographers dubbed “homma” rent out a cafe in Greater Seoul. The word is a portmanteau of “home” and “master,” and was first coined when shutterbugs operated their personal websites to share pictures they took of their favorite singers. 


Exclusive goodies, such as the calendar and the mug, are exhibited on the shelving unit and the wall to celebrate Jung-kook’s birthday. (Kweon Ha-bin/The Korea Herald)

Exclusive goodies, such as the calendar and the mug, are exhibited on the shelving unit and the wall to celebrate Jung-kook’s birthday. (Kweon Ha-bin/The Korea Herald)


Idol fans used to find themselves spending an entire day celebrating birthdays, mainly near the posh Gangnam district where many A-list K-pop giants or entertainment facilities are situated. But homma have branched out to the bustling Hongdae area or nondescript Seongsu-dong to welcome more fans and coffee buffs.

Although the birthday boys and girls do not actually show up most of the time, homma and fans are satisfied that they get to see and show their idols through exclusive goodies, pictures on the wall, music played all day and custom-made cup sleeves.

Rental fees are paid for by selling the pictures, videos and exclusive merchandise made with photos taken by the homma. Leftover cash is sometimes used to run other events or donated to idols’ fan clubs.

So when a well-known musician’s birthday nears, homma and a group of fervent devotees come together at cafes to invite other idol lovers. Fans get information about which homma will host an event and later travel to the spot to take pictures.

And if they are lucky enough, fans who stop by the birthday cafe could be able to walk out the doors with unique or even limited edition goods provided by organizers in their hands, although the giveaways are mainly on a first-come, first-served basis.

Shift in consumption patterns

Various merchandise and birthday-related events used to be solely organized and sold by entertainment companies. When a group came out with its latest print, agencies would present a wide range of idol-related goodies, such as T-shirts, accessories, lightsticks and water bottles. And when the bandmates wear or use these goods, the items sell out instantly. Agencies would also arrange small meet-and-greet birthday parties with the singer and fans. 


BTS merchandise and pictures are displayed on the shelf. (Kweon Ha-bin/The Korea Herald)

BTS merchandise and pictures are displayed on the shelf. (Kweon Ha-bin/The Korea Herald)


K-pop merchandise has witnessed soaring sales in recent years. According to e-commerce platform eBay Korea, sales for the goodies in March rose more than 50 percent compared to the same month in the previous year. Also, sales in April rose 57 percent compared to

In particular, fans who cannot visit Korea to see their favorite singers flocked to online platforms to purchase merchandise produced by agency labels. And as the Korean music scene has gradually increased in size, more foreign fans are taking themselves to online Korean platform channels.

But K-pop superfans have been expanding their consumption horizons in a new direction as the industry’s fame has grown far and wide.

Led by the rise of the Korean music scene, a growing number of enthusiasts started creating self-made items and various events that paved the way for a “goods” niche market. The market has since grown thanks to fans who were willing to invest their time and money to collect big and small souvenirs related to their favorite pop stars.

“Prices of the merchandise, the refund and exchange system, selling products with defects and ticket prices were moot points among fans and companies. Fans would obviously want to purchase at a lower price while entertainment labels would want the exact opposite,” said Lee Eun-hee, a consumer studies professor at Inha University.

She echoed her stance that fans have swerved to “prosumer” activities in recent years by actively engaging in making product lines that satisfy them. Lee added that media-savvy fans do not stay loyal to goodies presented by companies, as they can produce quality commodities themselves, although copyright issues could arise from this process.

She described the changeover as a “fan-centered play culture,” saying that agencies vend a limited amount of merchandise, but fans have idiosyncratic flairs to design unique products.

But she raised concerns about how the consumption market is becoming too commercialized. She added that the purchasing behavior of fans is getting out of hand.

“Idol devotees are creating, selling and buying products that are fashioned by themselves, which means agencies do not supply the commodities. However, prices are way off the displayed value.”

She added that prices would eventually drop if more items were traded among fans. “Various events and merchandise made by fans could invigorate the economy and be a tool of soft power in the long run,” she said.

By Park Jun-hee ([email protected])

Sours: http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=

Fan Cafe

FAQ:

Q: WHY IS THERE A COST FOR ADVANCE RESERVATIONS?

A: THE SMALL COST KEEPS “SCALPERS” FROM HOARDING MULTIPLE FREE RESERVATIONS AND NOT SHOWING UP ON EVENT DAY. THE SMALL COST IS WHAT EVENTBRITE CHARGES US AS THEIR FEE PER TICKET. YOU CAN ALWAYS JOIN OUR VIRTUAL STAND-BY LINE ON EVENT DAY FOR A FREE ALTERNATIVE TO ADVANCE RESERVATIONS.

Q. DO I HAVE TO BOOK A RESERVATION TO ENTER THE CAFE?

A. NO YOU DO NOT NEED A RESERVATION TO ENJOY THE CAFE. ANYONE CAN GET INTO THE FREE VIRTUAL STAND-BY LINE. BUT RESERVATIONS LINE WILL BE SHORTER WAIT TIME AND HAVE GUARANTEED ENTRY.

Q: CAN I BOOK RESERVATIONS FOR MY WHOLE PARTY?

A: YES, 1 PERSON MAY BOOK RESERVATIONS FOR THE ENTIRE PARTY (UP TO 10 PEOPLE).

Q: WHAT IF I’M LATE FOR MY RESERVATION TIME BLOCK?

A: BEST TO ARRIVE ON TIME OR EARLY FOR YOUR TIME BLOCK BUT IF YOU ARE LATE, YOU CAN STILL GET INTO THE VIRTUAL STAND-BY LINE LINE.

Q: CAN I RE-ENTER THE CAFE AFTER I EXIT?

A: YES, IF IT IS YOUR TIME BLOCK YOU CAN RE-ENTER, HOWEVER IF YOUR TIME BLOCK HAS EXPIRED, YOU MAY GET INTO THE VIRTUAL STAND-BY LINE AT ANY TIME.

Q: CAN I VISIT OTHER SHOPS & RESTAURANTS PRIOR TO MY RESERVATION TIME BLOCK?

A: YES INDEED! WE HIGHLY ENCOURAGE THIS! THE POINT OF THE RESERVATION SYSTEM & THE FREE VIRTUAL STAND-BY LINE IS SO YOU CAN ENJOY THE OTHER SHOPS AND DO WHATEVER AT YOUR LEISURE BEFORE ARRIVING FOR YOUR TIME BLOCK.

SAFETY RULES:

  1. Face masks are REQUIRED for entry.

  2. Face masks should be worn at all times before and after eating

  3. Please try to maintain a safe distance between your tribe and others while waiting in line.

  4. Please wash your hands before and after eating or make use of the hand sanitizer stations available throughout the venue.

  5. If you are feeling sick, PLEASE STAY HOME. We will reserve a handful of cup sleeves and giveaways for the week following the event for folks who couldn’t make it.

Sours: http://www.popfancypops.com/fancafe
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Fans of the K-pop band Stray Kids held an event at Heere Tea in Fullerton Sunday afternoon featuring cup sleeves&#; a cheapand creative way to create unique fan-made merchandise.

K-pop is beginning to gain some traction in the United States, and the result is fans celebrating their favorite acts in ways that may seem foreign. In many Asian countries, fans of K-pop hold gatherings called cup-sleeve events.

Cup-sleeve events are a particular celebration of a special event within K-pop groups. The event&#;s subject ranges from anniversaries, birthdays or even celebrating a tour. Most occur either at a boba shop or caf&#; that is supportive of the genre and involves selling different trinkets, such as pins or photos with the band member&#;s faces on them, but the event&#;s star item is the cup sleeve itself.

Close up of the cup sleeves featured at Heere Tea.

Close up of the cup sleeves featured at Heere Tea. Photo credit: Ryan Davis

&#;A lot of the time, while fans are waiting for those events, they will have little items like the cup sleeve to trade with other fans, and that kind of helps to create a stronger fanbase as well,&#; Laarnie Barcelon, a former Fullerton College student, said.

Barcelon has helped host several different K-pop events, including several cup-sleeve events. One of the main reasons she helps organize cup-sleeve events, in particular, is to help caf&#;s during the pandemic.

&#;When working with a caf&#; I can help them earn money because COVID has really hit a lot of places,&#; Barcelon said.

Mural of the K-pop band Stray Kids.

Mural of the K-pop band Stray Kids. Photo credit: Ryan Davis

According to Barcelon, anyone can be involved or set up one of these events however, COVID restrictions, permits and locations where the event is hosted are things that should be kept in mind. She advises keeping in mind the location that will be hosting and how many are planning to attend as well.

While other fanbases may host meet-and-greets, cup-sleeve events are almost exclusive to the K-pop community. There are some reasons for this&#; copyright infringement being one of the biggest.

Other fanbases have their ways of celebrating their celebrities. The anime fanbase typically will host entire conventions such as Anime Expo.

The event Sunday was in celebration of two birthdays and the third anniversary of the group Stray Kids coming together under the entertainment company JYP. The birthday celebrations were for band members I.N. (Yang Jeongin) and Hyunjin (Hwang Hyunjin).

The caf&#; played K-pop music while the staff was hard at work trying to fill everyone&#;s orders. Not everyone who came into the shop was attending the event. In fact, most people coming in were normal customers getting their tea; but this didn&#;t stop them from stopping and taking pictures of the displays on the tables and walls of the caf&#;.

Event organizers waiting for the next group to show up.

Event organizers waiting for the next group to show up. Photo credit: Ryan Davis

The event lasted from 1 to 6 p.m. in blocks of one hour. During each hour, 15 people who RSVP&#;d online were allowed into the shop for the event. Everyone was required to wear masks and follow the shop&#;s COVID guidelines.

While it was limited, almost every RSVP was snapped up by Saturday.

A spread dedicated to Hyunjin (Hwang Hyunjin) of the K-pop group Stray Kids.

A spread dedicated to Hyunjin (Hwang Hyunjin) of the K-pop group Stray Kids. Photo credit: Ryan Davis

This is not the first time that Heere Tea has hosted an event like this. The cup-sleeve event brought in nearly 75 people, but Barcelon said other events she&#;s been a part of had more than people in attendance.

&#;Usually you can turn to social media for these types of events,&#; Barcelon said. &#;There are also accounts out there depending on your area that you can find if you use certain words like &#;California Cup Sleeve&#;, &#;K-pop&#; or &#;SKZ Cup Sleeve LA&#;.&#;

View highlights of the day and get K-pop event updates on Barcelon&#;s Instagram @rikachuuable.

Ryan Davis

Ryan Davis (He/Him) is a journalism major from La Habra, Ca. He likes to cook, write, and workout in his free time.

Ryan Davis

Author: Ryan Davis

Ryan Davis (He/Him) is a journalism major from La Habra, Ca. He likes to cook, write, and workout in his free time.

Sours: https://hornet.fullcoll.edu/stray-kids-fans-hype-up-cup-sleeves-at-local-cafe/
[Study Abroad 2021] Kpop Birthday Cafe Events - The Boyz, TXT, STRAY KIDS, G-IDLE, IZ*ONE

When fans want to show their full support for their favorite idol group, it seems like they will go all the way out with all their resources and knowledge.

Recently, it has gotten the attention that BTS's fans, ARMY living in Korea had actually came out with a system called 'Army Map'.

It allows ARMY to keep track of birthday events that is taking place in any part of Korea by registering them on a system. You can check out the website here.

BTS&#;s Fans Develop &#;Army Map&#; To Keep Track Of Birthday Events Happening In Korea

Army Map

Taking a look at the map, those pop-ups in purple show that there are birthday events such as cafe or exhibition happening at that location.

It is noted that BTS's JungKook will be having his 23rd birthday (Korean age) on Sept. 1 and hence, there are many events held right now.

Adding on how diverse ARMY are all over the world, 'Army Map' is also available in English and Japanese.

BTS&#;s Fans Develop &#;Army Map&#; To Keep Track Of Birthday Events Happening In Korea

Army Map

Once you click on one particular location, it will show basic information of the cafe as well as the event period. For the above cafe, it also shows that fans will receive 2 photocards with each purchase of drink from the cafe.

Many are impressed by 'Army Map' and talked about how convenient it is for those who wish to find events taking place around their current location.

BTS is currently on break.

Are you also amazed by the idea of 'Army Map'?

 

Read More : BTS’s Fans Trend #ARMYHelpThePlanet After Noticing Massive Fire In Amazon Rainforest

BTS
Sours: https://www.kpopmap.com/bts-fans-develop-army-map-to-keep-track-of-birthday-events-happening-in-korea/

Events me near cafe kpop

Home > Entertainment > K-pop

A cafe is decorated with pictures of K-pop stars taken by avid photographers referred to as ″homma.″ The framed pictures and other merchandise such as coffee cup sleeves are later sold to the fans who visit the cafe as a part of "birthday tours" to celebrate their favorite idols. [SCREEN CAPTURE]

A cafe is decorated with pictures of K-pop stars taken by avid photographers referred to as ″homma.″ The framed pictures and other merchandise such as coffee cup sleeves are later sold to the fans who visit the cafe as a part of "birthday tours" to celebrate their favorite idols. [SCREEN CAPTURE]

 
On his birthday, followers gather together at a particular location, decorated with his face. They talk, laugh and share memories they have in front of shrines filled with items related to him. They spend the day on a pilgrimage around to similar places that celebrate the same event and take pictures in front of adverts and posters marking the day. This isn’t Christmas or Buddha’s birthday — this is the birthday of a K-pop idol.
 
For avid K-pop fans, concerts and fan meet-and-greets aren’t the only time of the year when they meet their fellow devotees. Birthdays are some of the biggest events on the calendar and are usually celebrated over a couple of days.
 
In events dubbed “Birthday Tour,” K-pop fans spend a full day celebrating the birthday of their favorite stars, mainly around southern Seoul’s neighborhood near Coex or Gangnam Station, western Seoul’s Hongdae or eastern Seoul’s Seongsu-dong where many K-pop agencies or entertainment facilities are located.
 
Fans take pictures of birthday ads in subway stations or other places as a part of the birthday tours. [SCREEN CAPTURE]

Fans take pictures of birthday ads in subway stations or other places as a part of the birthday tours. [SCREEN CAPTURE]

Cafe One Pick in southern Seoul rented out by fans of singer-actor Lee Jun-ho. [SCREEN CAPTURE]

Cafe One Pick in southern Seoul rented out by fans of singer-actor Lee Jun-ho. [SCREEN CAPTURE]

 
These events begin at a cafe rented out by fans, usually by amateur photographers referred to as “homma.” The term is a portmanteau of home and master, and was first coined years ago when photographers would run their own personal websites to upload the pictures they took of their favorite stars. Homma usually use the money they earn from selling the pictures of merchandise made with such photos to rent the cafes, donate to fan clubs or run other events.
 
Different homma or other enthusiastic fans also rent out cafes, so it’s usually the case that when a star’s birthday nears, fans gather information about who is hosting which events at what cafes, and then spend hours touring to each spot. While on one of these birthday tours the fans make pit stops to take pictures of the birthday adverts posted on public transportation. To lure wandering fans, organizers often offer special edition goods, usually on a first come first served basis.
 
“I starting by booking the cafe in October,” said a fan of AB6IX member Lee Dae-hwi, who recently hosted a birthday gathering at a cafe in Hongdae to celebrate Lee's 20th birthday on Jan. “Some cafes demand a rental fee, but many cafes that allow such events to take place are small and don’t see so many customers every day, so they’re happy to let us use their space on the condition that we sell the merchandise as a bundle with the drinks or other items from the cafe. It cost me around , won ($) to make the goods and buy decorations and props.”
 
Before the Covid pandemic, fans would even rent out cinema theaters, decorate the walls outside a screen with stars’ pictures and make coffee cup sleeves featuring the star's face to be sold at the theaters' shops. Because cafe owners and theater marketers know that such events are popular among fans, some even reach out and offer their spaces in advance. When it comes to the birthdays of big-name celebrities, competition for a space can be fierce.
 
The ″Lee Dae-hwi Screen″ rented out by fans of AB6IX member Lee Dae-hwi last year to celebrate his birthday at a CGV cinema in Seoul. [SCREEN CAPTURE]

The ″Lee Dae-hwi Screen″ rented out by fans of AB6IX member Lee Dae-hwi last year to celebrate his birthday at a CGV cinema in Seoul. [SCREEN CAPTURE]

The ″Lee Dae-hwi Screen″ rented out by fans of AB6IX member Lee Dae-hwi last year to celebrate his birthday at a CGV cinema in Seoul. [SCREEN CAPTURE]

The ″Lee Dae-hwi Screen″ rented out by fans of AB6IX member Lee Dae-hwi last year to celebrate his birthday at a CGV cinema in Seoul. [SCREEN CAPTURE]

 
“It helps with the promotion of the cafe and the sales are higher than usual,” said the owner of Chris Garden, a cafe in Hongdae, that is frequently rented out for birthday events. “For fans, it’s about gathering and celebrating in the same space, but it’s helpful for the cafes as well. But the success of the event isn’t always equal to the size of the fandom, so there’s really no telling what the revenue will be." 
 
The practice of renting out cafes first began in the early s era of TVXQ. In particular, cafes near agencies were chosen as venues in the hopes that the stars themselves would pop in for a visit. In fact, just last weekend, AB6IX member Lee's mother paid a surprise visit to one of the cafes where a birthday event was being held in Hongdae and last year members of boy band CIX traveled around the cafes in the Hongdae neighborhood for their members’ birthdays.
 

While the core of the events lie in celebrating and congratulating a star on their birthday then posting about it online to let the celebrity know just how much their fans adore them, a big part is also directed at other members of the fandom. In the case of homma and hard-core fans, they like to show off their work and loyalty to the band or idols. Those who do not count themselves as either also want to prove that non-hard-core fans love the stars just as much.
 
“Birthday events have been held for quite some time, but have mostly been organized by agencies as fan meet-and-greets or by core members of fan clubs,” said Shin Yoon-hee, the author of “Fandom ,” a book which takes a comprehensive look into the evolution of fandoms in Korea. “Yet through social media, it has become possible for individual fans to hold their own events and share the information online, which makes it easier for not-so-serious-fans and even just the general public to plan their trips to the cafes. It’s a form of solidarity among the fan community, as well as a symbol of independence of individual consumers.”
 
A cafe is decorated with pictures of K-pop stars. [SCREEN CAPTURE]

A cafe is decorated with pictures of K-pop stars. [SCREEN CAPTURE]

Goods created by fans of singer-actor Lee Jun-ho as a part of his birthday tour. [SCREEN CAPTURE]

Goods created by fans of singer-actor Lee Jun-ho as a part of his birthday tour. [SCREEN CAPTURE]

 
According to Kim Jung-won, an ethnomusicologist teaching at Yonsei University, the practice has a resemblance to religion and the events are equivalent to religious rituals. K-pop fans celebrate the birthdays of the subjects of their worship without their presence as people would for Jesus and Buddha. Like religion, it has its dangers, but it's up to the individuals to take the positive aspects and enjoy the culture.
 
"People like and follow K-pop stars and in essence it's not much different from following religious leaders. This is a culture that’s here to stay and this is a ritual that’s not just unique to K-pop now — actors and other celebrities are getting their own rituals, too," said Kim. "It brings comfort to have a subject that you can trust and love, which is why you spend money, time and effort to express that sense of contentment. Artists return that favor usually through music, and that content again gives joy to fans, in a positive cycle. That leads to a deepened sense of trust and belief and the rituals continue."
 
BY YOON SO-YEON     [[email protected]
Sours: https://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com//02/02/entertainment/kpop/Kpop-Birthday-Tour-cafe/html
Kpop tour to Gangnam, Line flagship store \u0026 event cafe VLOG

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