84th infantry division wwii roster

84th infantry division wwii roster DEFAULT

84th Infantry Division

When it fought in France during the last war, the 84th called itself the "Lincoln” Division. When this war started, me men of the outfit were calling themselves the “Railsplitters.” But not long after they bumped into the German Army on the Seigfried Line, the Nazis had a new name for them—and it had nothing to do with the biographical background of Abraham Lincoln.

The Germans called them the Hatchet Men.

It was November 18, 1944, when the 84th first struck. Only a few weeks before it had been in the United States. After sailing to England and training at Winchester—where a few men were detached to go to the Continent and help speed supplies over the famous Red Ball Highway—Railsplitters embarked for France and were rushed to the Siegfried Line. Then began two months of savage fighting during which the 84th took 112 German pillboxes and bunkers in the Siegfried Line, and helped to crush Rundstedt’s counteroffensive in the Ardennes. It was as notable a start as any fighting outfit could hope to have.

Assigned to the British Second Army, the 84th set its sights upon Geilenkirchen, a mining and transportation center with a population of 20,000. The 334th Infantry jumped off first, with Prummern as its objective. The regiment was supposed to have armored support, but its tanks bogged down in the mud. This didn’t stop the Doughboys; they went in anyhow. Then the 333d Infantry joined in the fray, and Geilenkirchen fell on tie 19th shortly followed by Suggerath, Lindem, Beeck, and—in one of the war’s best examples of infantry-artillery teamwork-Leiffarth. As the 84th pushed toward this city, the Infantry moved forward confidently a scant 50 yards behind the crashing shells of its own big guns. Mullendorf was the scene of the Railsplitters’ last operations in the Siegfried Line sector, and the campaign was fittingly concluded when a battalion commander strode out of Nazi headquarters puffing a big cigar, with a captured swastika slung over his shoulder.

On January 2, while the German counteroffensive in the Ardennes was at its height, the 84th was rushed back to help and made a gallant stand south of Marche. With no flank support, the Railsplitters held their ground and beat off one fierce enemy thrust after another. Shifted later to the north side of the German bulge, under the First Army, the Division set off a counterattack with the 2nd Armored Division. Snow temporarily stopped most of the “Hell on Wheels” tanks, but it couldn't stop the Infantry. One bunch of Doughboys—the 1st Battalion of the 335th Infantry—made an urgent request for hundreds of suits of long winter underwear. Donning these over then-combat uniforms, they sneaked across the white fields and took the enemy completely by surprise. By January 16 the 84th had rolled into Houffalize, and on that day, near Ourthe, one of its units joined up with the 11th Armored Division—thus officiallv linking the First and Third Armies and closing the gap that had separated them in the Ardennes salient.

Moved secretly to an assembly area in Holland, the Railsplitters swept across the Roer River on February 23, and then, led by a motorized task force built around the 334th Infantry, thev roared forward—overrunning a German officers’ replacement pool, not even bothering to stop to take many prisoners, capturing one city’s whole police force intact, taking Dulken, Krefeld, and Moers, and ending up at the Rhine. They almost got to the other side via a tunnel connected to a mine shaft at Homburg, but the tunnel had been mined. After crossing on the surface, they went on over the Weser River, took Erbeck, captured a Nazi arms factory built 350 feet into the side of a cliff, and drove into Hannover. Farther on, at Brunswick, they consolidated forces withe 5th Armored Division, and the two outfits joined the British to wipe out an enemy pocket along the Elbe south of Hamburg.

After V-E Day, with headquarters at hannover, the Railsplitters spent weeks trying to help displaced persons get started on their way home.

From Fighting Divisions, Kahn & McLemore, Infantry Journal Press, 1945-1946.

84th Infantry Division World War II Missing in Action

There are 41 soldiers of the 84th Infantry Division World War II still listed as missing in action.

Sours: https://www.sonsoflibertymuseum.org/84th-infantry-division-ww2.cfm

Branson Reunion Railsplitter Veteran Video Interveiws

   It was great to see and meet everybody in Branson at the reunion, especiall hearing everybody's stories of their WWII experiences. I was able to film about 20 intereiws and will put up a link to them as I get them edited (in my "spare" time). Please click on the "read more" link below to see them as I put them up.
Thanks to Tim Scherrer and all the members of Company H, 334th Infantry Regiment, 84th Infantry Division Reenacted for all the displays they brought.
Rick Bell
son of 1Sgt/2Lt Foster F. Bell E333

Battle for Weiser Gerbridge

Foreword

This documentary is an extract from my chronicle of World War II at Bad Eilsen and its
vicinity. At this time I only have a version in german language. Mr. Richard Bell was so
friendly to allow a publication on this webpage until I can provide a reasonable translation.
If there is someone who can read it, I would be happy. Also I think, there are some inter-
ested german visitors on this page, too.

Railsplitter Reunion in Branson

     It was great to see and meet everybody in Branson at the reunion, especially hearing everybody's stories of their WWII experiences. I was able to film about 20 interviews and will put up a link to them as I get them edited (in my "spare" time).  Being new to this I turned my camera like I was going to take a portrait and filmed that way, so they came out rotated sideways. I will have to buy the software to flip them.

Thanks to Tim Scherrer and all the members of Company H, 334th Infantry Regiment, 84th Infantry Division Reenacted for all the displays they brought.

Pfc. Charles E. Casper

Charles E. Casper
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Service # 33440208
333rd Infantry Regiment, 84th Infantry Division  Assigned to 1 Plt. E333
Entered the Service from: Mount Lebanon, Pennsylvania
Died: 9-Apr-45
Buried at: Plot F Row 15 Grave 9
Netherlands American Cemetery
Margraten, Netherlands  
Awards: Distinguished Service Cross, Bronze Star, Purple Heart
Campaigns: R.A.CE

http://www.84thinfantry.com/sites/all/modules/hierarchy/downloadfile.php?imageID=88

Final Railsplitter Newsletter

The Railsplitter Society published its final newsletter 21 Mar 2012 after it's final reunion in August 2011 when the Society was disolved.

To see the newsletter click on the link below:
http://www.84thinfantry.com/?q=image/tid/10

Rick Bell
Son of 1st/Sgt/2Lt Foster F. Bell E333
84th Website Admin

84th Infantry Website

This site is dedicated to the men who served in the 84th Infantry Division in WWII. Articles and photos are cataloged in "Media" under the various 84th units. There are links to 84th content on the web under "Resources". There are some images and Railsplitter Society Newsletters under "Image Galleries".

Message Board

Due to a constant barrage of spam postings on the message board I have chosen to deactivate it at this time. If you wish to contact me about your 84th relative I will research him as much as possible and give you a timely reply via email. There is a link under "Media>Message Board Posting Info>Documents" that will give you my contact information under the title "How to post to the Message Board". Note: the "link" in the PDF version will not work as a link and needs to be copied and pasted into your email. The .doc version will work as a link.

Facebook Sites for Railsplitters

The following are Railsplitter Facebook groups:

Family and Friends of the 84th Infantry Division
https://www.facebook.com/groups/81750034670/

84th Railsplitters Society Splinters
https://www.facebook.com/groups/139553929470954/

Hello

Submitted by Sadmin on Fri, 03/29/2019 - 00:28

Welcome to the 84th Infantry division web site dedicated to the men who served in the 84th during WWII. The site is currently under construction as to content. You may submit your content for posting by our administrators. We take all types of media. Please only 84th content. Submit under the appropriate sub unit.

Subscribe to

Sours: http://www.84thinfantry.com/
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84th Division (United States)

Military unit

The 84th Training Command ("Railsplitters"[1]) is a formation of the United States Army. During World War I it was designated the 84th Division, American Expeditionary Forces; during World War II it was known as the 84th Infantry Division. From 1946 to 1952, the division was a part of the United States Army Reserve as the 84th Airborne Division. In 1959, the division was reorganized and redesignated once more as the 84th Division. The division was headquartered in Milwaukee in command of over 4,100 soldiers divided into eight brigades—including an ROTC brigade—spread throughout seven states.

Changes to the U.S. Army Reserve organizations from 2005 until 2007 redesigned the unit as the 84th Training Command (Leader Readiness) and it was paired with the Army Reserve Readiness Training Center (ARRTC). The flag resided at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin. As a result of Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) throughout the Army, the ARRTC was moved to Fort Knox, Kentucky. The 84th Training Command (LR) underwent a command-directed move to Fort Knox, Kentucky in advance of the ARRTC in September 2008. Since the move, the 84th Training Command and ARRTC split, leaving the ARRTC with leader readiness and training support. The 84th Training Command was re-designated once again to 84th Training Command (Unit Readiness).

In September 2010, the 84th was renamed 84th Training Command and began reorganization. The 84th mission currently supports three numbered and three named training divisions – The 78th Training Division (Ft. Dix, NJ), the 86th Training Division (Ft. McCoy, WI), and the 91st Training Division (Ft. Hunter Liggett, CA), Atlantic Training Division (Ft. Dix, NJ), Great Lakes Training Division (Arlington Heights, IL), Pacific Training Division (Camp Parks, Dublin, CA)

Tradition has it that the division traces its lineage to the Illinois militia company in which a young CaptainAbraham Lincoln served during the Black Hawk War of 1832.[citation needed] The division patch was selected to honor this legacy and the division's origin in Illinois. For this reason, the alternative nickname of "Lincoln County" Division" has been used to denote the 84th.

World War I[edit]

The 84th Division trained at Camp Zachary Taylor during World War I. Troops from Indianaand Kentuckymade up this division.

For World War I, personnel were first enlisted from the states of Illinois, Wisconsin, and Kentucky and were formed into an infantry division in 1917, whereupon they chose the formation's distinctive patch and nickname. Organized at Camp Taylor, Kentucky, in Sept., 1917. The division was composed of National Army drafts from Indiana and Kentucky, and remained in training at Camp Taylor until Aug., 1918. It was deployed to France in October 1918 to serve as a training formation for replacements which would be sent to the Western Front. At the war's end, the formation was recalled home and, without having seen combat actions, inactivated in January 1919.

Its commanders included Brig. Gen. Wilber E. Wilder (25 August 1917), Maj. Gen. Harry C. Hale (6 October 1917), Brig. Gen. Wilber E. Wilder (26 November 1917), Brig. Gen. Wilber E. Wilder (15 December 1917), Maj. Gen. Harry C. Hale (1 March 1918), Maj. Gen. Harry C. Hale (5 June 1918), Maj. Gen. Harry C. Hale (21 July 1918), Brig. Gen. Wilber E. Wilder (18 October 1918), Maj. Gen. Harry C. Hale (31 October 1918).

Order of battle[edit]

  • Headquarters, 84th Division
  • 167th Infantry Brigade
    • 333rd Infantry Regiment
    • 334th Infantry Regiment
    • 326th Machine Gun Battalion
  • 168th Infantry Brigade
    • 335th Infantry Regiment
    • 336th Infantry Regiment
    • 327th Machine Gun Battalion
  • 159th Field Artillery Brigade
    • 325th Field Artillery Regiment (75 mm)
    • 326th Field Artillery Regiment (75 mm)
    • 327th Field Artillery Regiment (155 mm)
    • 309th Trench Mortar Battery
  • 325th Machine Gun Battalion
  • 309th Engineer Regiment
  • 309th Field Signal Battalion
  • Headquarters Troop, 84th Division
  • 309th Train Headquarters and Military Police
    • 309th Ammunition Train
    • 309th Supply Train
    • 309th Engineer Train
    • 309th Sanitary Train
      • 333rd, 334th, 335th, and 336th Ambulance Companies and Field Hospitals

Interwar period[edit]

The division was reconstituted in the Organized Reserve on 24 June 1921 and assigned to the state of Indiana. The headquarters was organized on 6 September 1921.

World War II[edit]

The 84th Infantry Division was ordered into active military service on 15 October 1942, at Camp Howze, Texas, about 60 miles north of Dallas. Then, it was composed of the 333rd, 334th and 335th Inf. Regts.; 325th, 326th, 327th and 909th FA Bns.; 309th Engr. Combat Bn.; 309th Med, Bn.; 84th Sig. Co.; 784th Ord. Light Maintenance Co.; 84th QM Co.; 84th Recon Troop. It embarked on 20 September 1944 and arrived in the United Kingdom on 1 October, for additional training. The division landed on Omaha Beach, 1–4 November 1944, and moved to the vicinity of Gulpen, the Netherlands, 5–12 November.

The division entered combat on 18 November with an attack on Geilenkirchen, Germany, (Operation Clipper) as part of the larger offensive in the Roer Valley, north of Aachen. Operating under the command of Lt-Gen Brian Horrocks the division was supported by British tanks of the Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry, specialist armoured units of 79th Armoured Division, and XXX Corps' artillery.[2][3][4] Taking Geilenkirchen on 19 November, the division pushed forward to take Beeck (Geilenkirchen) and Lindern (Geilenkirchen) in the face of heavy enemy resistance, 29 November.[5] After a short rest, the division returned to the fight, taking Wurm and Würm (Geilenkirchen), Mullendorf, 18 December, before moving to Belgium to help stem the German winter offensive (Battle of the Bulge).

Battling in snow, sleet, and rain, the division threw off German attacks, recaptured Verdenne, 24–28 December, took Beffe and Devantave (Rendeux), 4–6 January 1945, and seized La Roche, 11 January. By 16 January, the Bulge had been reduced. After a 5-day respite, the 84th resumed the offensive, taking Gouvy and Beho. On 7 February, the division assumed responsibility for the Roer River zone, between Linnich and Himmerich (near Heinsberg), and trained for the river crossing.

On 23 February 1945, the second day of Operation Grenade, the division cut across the Roer, took Boisheim and Dülken, 1 March, crossed the Niers on 2 March, took Krefeld, 3 March, and reached the Rhine by 5 March. One day before, the 'Krefeld-Uerdinger Brücke' was blown off by Wehrmacht soldiers.[6] The division trained along the west bank of the river in March.

After crossing the Rhine, 1 April, the division drove from Lembeck toward Bielefeld in conjunction with the 5th Armored Division, crossing the Weser River to capture Hanover, 10 April. By 13 April, it had reached the Elbe, and halted its advance, patrolling along the river. Soviet troops were contacted at Balow, 2 May 1945. The division remained on occupation duty in Germany after VE-day, returning to the United States on 19 January 1946 for demobilization. It was redesignated a reserve formation on 21 January 1946.

Troops of the 84th Infantry Division liberated two satellite camps of the Neuengamme Concentration Camp: Ahlem (a.k.a. Hannover-Ahlem), on 10 April 1945, and Salzwedel, on 14 April 1945. As such, the 84th is officially recognized as a "Liberating Unit" by both the U.S. Army's Center of Military History and the Holocaust Memorial Museum.[7]

Casualties[edit]

  • Total battle casualties: 7,260[8]
  • Killed in action: 1,284[8]
  • Wounded in action: 5,098[8]
  • Missing in action: 129[8]
  • Prisoner of war: 749[8]
  • Campaigns: Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe.
  • Days of combat: 170.
  • Distinguished Unit Citations: 7.
  • Awards: Distinguished Service Cross (United States)-12 ; Distinguished Service Medal (United States)-1 ; Silver Star-555; LM-4; SM-27 ; BSM-2,962 ; AM-59.
  • Commanders: Maj. Gen. John H. Hilldring (October 1942 – February 1943), Maj. Gen. Stonewall Jackson (February–October 1943), Maj. Gen. Robert B. McClure (October 1943 – March 1944), Maj. Gen. Roscoe B. Woodruff (March–June 1944), Maj. Gen. Alexander R. Bolling (June 1944 to 1946).

Order of battle[edit]

  • Headquarters, 84th Infantry Division
  • 333rd Infantry Regiment
  • 334th Infantry Regiment
  • 335th Infantry Regiment
  • Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 84th Infantry Division Artillery
    • 325th Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm)
    • 326th Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm)
    • 327th Field Artillery Battalion (155 mm)
    • 909th Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm)
  • 309th Engineer Combat Battalion
  • 309th Medical Battalion
  • 84th Cavalry Reconnaissance Troop (Mechanized)
  • Headquarters, Special Troops, 84th Infantry Division
    • Headquarters Company, 84th Infantry Division
    • 784th Ordnance Light Maintenance Company
    • 84th Quartermaster Company
    • 84th Signal Company
    • Military Police Platoon
    • Band
  • 84th Counterintelligence Corps Detachment

Assignments in European Theater of Operations[edit]

  • 10 September 1944: Ninth Army, ETOUSA.
  • 21 September 1944: III Corps.
  • 4 November 1944: XIX Corps, Ninth Army, 12th Army Group.
  • 8 November 1944: XIII Corps.
  • 11 November 1944: Ninth Army, 12th Army Group, but attached for operations to the British XXX Corps, British Second Army, British 21st Army Group.
  • 23 November 1944: XIII Corps, Ninth Army, 12th Army Group.
  • 20 December 1944: Ninth Army, 12th Army Group, but attached to the XVIII (Abn) Corps of First Army, itself attached to the British 21st Army Group.
  • 20 December 1944: VII Corps.
  • 22 December 1944: VII Corps, First Army (attached to British 21st Army Group), 12th Army Group.
  • 18 January 1945: VII Corps, First Army, 12th Army Group.
  • 23 January 1945: XVIII (Abn) Corps.
  • 3 February 1945: XIII Corps, Ninth Army (attached to British 21st Army Group), 12th Army Group.
  • 4 April 1945: XIII Corps, Ninth Army, 12th Army Group.

Cold War to present[edit]

Following the conclusion of World War II, the division was made part of the Army Reserve. In January 1946, it was redesignated the 84th Airborne Division and headquartered out of Wisconsin. In 1947, it was designated as the Army's Airborne Reserve Command. Five years later, in 1952, the division was reorganized again, this time as a training division composed of three regiments—the 274th, 334th, and 339th. Throughout the 1950s, the division would continue its conversion to a training formation, changing its subordinate unit makeup from regiments to brigades and support groups.

On 24 January 1991, elements of the 84th Division (Training) were activated and mobilized for support roles in Operation Desert Storm. Less than three months later, on 22 March 1991, the elements were returned home. In 1993, reorganization within the Army Reserve brought about the merger between the 84th and the 85th Division (Training). The move expanded the 84th Division's area of command to include the rest of Wisconsin and Illinois, as well as all of Missouri and Iowa. Soon after, in June 1994, units from the 84th participated in peacekeeping operations as part of the multinational observer force in the Sinai, Egypt, and remained there until July 1995.

In April 1995, the formation was once more redesignated, this time as an institutional training division. This change brought with it command of units and training in the state of Nebraska. In August 1995, army reorganization further expanded the 84th's range of authority to command the fourteen U.S. Army Reserve Forces Schools in Region E—Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio.

In October 2004, the 84th Division (Institutional Training) underwent a major transformation. All eight brigades realigned under the 100th Division and the Headquarters and Division Band combined with the Army Reserve Readiness Training Center (ARRTC) located at Fort McCoy, Wis., to create the 84th U.S. Army Reserve Readiness Training Command (84th USARRTC). The expertise and resources from the two units gave the 84th USARRTC an edge on the type and amount of training opportunities offered. The three Army Reserve NCO academies were also realigned under the new 84th USARRTC.

In October 2006, the 84th USARRTC underwent another major transformation as 12 brigades from the Army Reserve's Institutional Training Divisions realigned under the command. The brigades were responsible for Officer Education System (OES) training, such as the Combined Arms Exercise (CAX) and Intermediate Level Education (ILE), and Senior Reserve Officer Training Corps (SROTC) support to universities across the country.

In February 2007, the 84th USARRTC was renamed the 84th Training Command (Leader Readiness) in response to the unit's transformation under the Army Reserve's Decision Point 74. The 84th Training Command had exercise command and control over three professional development brigades, one schools brigade, one training development brigade, the 84th Division Band, and eventually the Small Arms Readiness Group.

In September 2008, the 84th Training Command relocated from Milwaukee, Wisconsin and Fort McCoy, Wisconsin to Fort Knox, Kentucky.

In October 2009, the focus of the 84th Training Command shifted from leader readiness to unit readiness. The Army Reserve Readiness Training Center and the three U.S. Army Reserve NCO Academies moved from the umbrella of the 84th and became the 83rd USARRTC which reported directly to the U.S. Army Reserve Command.

In October 2010, the 84th Training Command reorganized to align with the transformation of the Army Reserve. The 84th Training Command is the executing agent of the U.S. Army Reserve's Combat Support Training Programs which includes Warrior Exercises (WAREX), Combat Support Training Exercises (CSTX). The 84th Training Command provides multiple collective training opportunities which prepare units for operational deployments worldwide.

Subordinate units[edit]

The 84th Training Command as of August 2016:

  • Headquarters, 84th Training Command (Fort Knox, Kentucky)
  • 78th Training Division (Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey)
    • 1st Brigade OPS (Fort Gillem, Georgia)
      • 3rd Battalion/318th Regiment (Fort Meade, Maryland)
      • 2nd Battalion/323rd Regiment (Lumberton, North Carolina)
      • 2nd Battalion/311th Regiment (Fort Bragg, North Carolina)
      • 3rd Battalion/309th Regiment (Liverpool, New York)
  • 86th Training Division (Fort McCoy, Wisconsin)
    • 1st Brigade OPS (Milwaukee, Wisconsin)
      • 1st Battalion/329th Regiment (Indianapolis, Indiana)
      • 3rd Battalion/397th Regiment (Whitehall, Ohio)
      • 2nd Battalion/383rd Regiment (Fort Leavenworth, Kansas)
      • 3rd Battalion/346th Regiment (Hattiesburg, Mississippi)
  • 91st Training Division (Fort Hunter Liggett, California)
    • 1st Brigade OPS (Scottsdale, Arizona)
      • 11th Battalion/104th Regiment (Boise, Idaho)
      • 2nd Battalion/378th Regiment (Salt Lake City, Utah)
      • 3rd Battalion/290th Regiment (Mustang, Oklahoma)
      • 3rd Battalion/381st Regiment (Grand Prairie, Texas)
  • Atlantic Training Division (Fort Dix, NJ)
  • Great Lakes Training Division (Fort Sheridan, IL)
  • Pacific Training Division (Camp Parks, Dublin, CA)

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

Sources[edit]

  • Stanley Christopherson (James Holland, ed.), An Englishman at War: The Wartime Diaries of Stanley Christopherson, DSO, MC, TD, London: Bantam, 2014, ISBN 978-0593068373.
  • Richard Doherty, Hobart's 79th Armoured Division at War: Invention, Innovation and Inspiration, Barnsley: Pen & Sword, 2011, ISBN 978-1-84884-398-1.
  • Lt-Gen Sir Brian Horrocks, A Full Life, London: Collins, 1960.
  • here The Army Almanac: A Book of Facts Concerning the Army of the United States - U.S. Government Printing Office, 1950
  • US Army Reserve
  • Holocaust Encyclopedia

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/84th_Division_(United_States)
84TH Division in Germany WWII. Photography images photo pictures. Part 1

84th Infantry Division - Railsplitters

Activated 15 Oct 42  •  Entered Combat 18 Dec 1944  •  Days of Combat 170  •  Casualties 7,260

1_b.jpg

Commanding General

Maj. Gen. John H. Hildring  Oct 42 
Maj. Gen. Stonewall Jackson  Feb 43
Maj. Gen. Robert B. McClure  Oct 43
Maj. Gen. Roscoe B. Woodruff  Mar 44 
Maj. Gen. Alexander R. Bolling  Jun 44

84th_infantry_v2-950.png

This campaign map shows the route of the 84th Infantry Division throughout Europe during World War II.  This chart is available for purchase at HistoryShots.com.

buy_map_button.png

DIVISION CHRONICLE

The 84th Infantry Division arrived in England, 1 October 1944, and trained. It landed on Omaha Beach, 1-4 November 1944, and moved to the vicinity of Gulpen, Holland, 5-12 November. The Division entered combat, 18 November, with an attack on Geilenkirchen, Germany, as part of the larger offensive in the Roer Valley, north of Aachen. Taking Geilenkirchen, 19 November, the Division pushed forward to take Beeck and Lindern in the face of heavy enemy resistance, 29 November. After a short rest, the Division returned to the fight, taking Wurm and Mullendorf, 18 December, before moving to Belgium to help stem the German winter offensive. Battling in snow, sleet, and rain, the Division threw off German attacks, recaptured Verdenne, 24-28 December, took Beffe and Devantave, 4-6 January 1945, and seized Laroche, 11 January. By 16 January, the Bulge had been reduced. After a 5-day respite, the 84th resumed the offensive, taking Gouvy and Beho. On 7 February, the Division assumed responsibility for the Roer River zone, between Linnich and Himmerich, and trained for the river crossing. On 23 February 1945, the Division cut across the Roer, took Boisheim and Dulken, 1 March, crossed the Niers Canal on the 2d, took Krefeld, 3 March, and reached the Rhine by 5 March. The Division trained along the west bank of the river in March. After crossing the Rhine, 1 April, the Division drove from Lembeck toward Bielefeld in conjunction with the 5th Armored Division, crossing the Weser River to capture Hanover, 10 April. By 13 April, the Division had reached the Elbe, and halted its advance, patrolling along the river. The Russians were contacted at Balow, 2 May 1945. The Division remained on occupation duty in Germany after VEday, returning to the United States in January 1946 for demobilization.

Notes and sources:
Date Activated is the date the division was activated or inducted into federal service (national guard units).
Casualties are number of killed, wounded in action, captured, and missing.
The dates after the campaign name are the dates of the campaign not of the division.
The Army Almanac: A Book of Facts Concerning the Army of the United States; , U.S. Government Printing Office. Army Battle Casualties and Nonbattle Deaths in World War II, Final Report, 1 December 1941 - 31 December 1946. US Army Center of Military History at http://www.history.army.mil/ Various divisional histories

Sours: https://www.armydivs.com/84th-infantry-division

Division roster wwii infantry 84th

The 84th Infantry Division during World War II

84th Infantry Division Campaigns during World War II

The 84th Infantry Division was formed in 1917, the year the United States entered World War I. In World War II, the "Railsplitter" division landed on Omaha Beach in Normandy in early November 1944, five months after D-Day (June 6, 1944). From France, the unit moved quickly into the Netherlands in preparation for an offensive into Nazi Germany. During the Battle of the Bulge, the 84th was diverted to Belgium to stop the German offensive. In March 1945, it moved into the Rhineland and subsequently advanced northward, capturing the city of Hannover on April 10. The 84th eventually made its way to the Elbe River and made contact with Soviet armed forces in early May 1945.

The 84th Infantry Division and the Liberation of Hannover-Ahlem and Salzwedel

As the "Railsplitter" division advanced into the interior of Germany, its troops uncovered Hannover-Ahlem (April 10, 1945) and Salzwedel (April 14, 1945), both satellite camps of the Neuengamme concentration camp. The SS established the Hannover-Ahlem camp on November 30, 1944, after transferring the camp and its inmates from the Continental Gummiwerke factory at Hannover-Stöcken. In Ahlem the inmates were forced to work in the nearby asphalt tunnels. These were to be cleared for the production of aircraft and Panzer parts for Continental Gummiwerke and Maschinenfabrik Hannover.

When the soldiers of the 84th entered the camp in Ahlem, they discovered an undetermined number of starving and ill Jewish prisoners. Reports range from 30 to 250 persons. The SS guards had abandoned these prisoners when they evacuated the camp, taking with them some 600 "healthy" prisoners. Of the prisoners sent on this death march, only 450 made it to the Bergen-Belsen camp. The SS guards had shot many of those who were unable to maintain the pace of the march. The US Army war crimes investigators reported that many of these survivors died soon after liberation from the accumulated abuse, mistreatment, and neglect they had suffered. They estimated that only 300 to 400 Jewish prisoners at Hannover-Ahlem survived the war.

Five Jewish survivors pose for a US Signal Corps photographer in front of Block 2 in the Hanover-Ahlem camp, a subcamp of Neuengamme.

Several days later, the 84th Infantry captured Salzwedel, a camp formed by the SS in July 1944 to supply forced labor for a German munitions factory. The unit found some 3,000 female inmates, mainly Jewish women who had been transported from the Auschwitz camp complex, and several hundred political prisoners. The US Army reported that sanitary conditions at the camp were poor because of overcrowding and a lack of water. Some 100 of these prisoners were seriously ill and 33 of them required immediate medical attention at a local hospital. The town's mayor was ordered to provide food immediately for the former inmates, who were subsequently moved into modern German barracks nearby.

Recognition as a Liberating Unit

The 84th Infantry Division was recognized as a liberating unit by the US Army's Center of Military History and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in 1993.

Liberator Vernon Tott (second from left) of the 84th Infantry was honored by some of the survivors he helped free from the Ahlem ...

84th Infantry Casualty Figures

Casualty figures for the 84th Infantry Division, European theater of operations:

  • Total battle casualties: 7,260
  • Total deaths in battle: 1,468

84th Infantry Division Nickname

The 84th Infantry Division derives its nickname, "Railsplitter" division, from the divisional insignia, an ax splitting a rail. This design was created during World War I, when the division was known as the "Lincoln" division to represent the states that supplied soldiers for the division: Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky. All figured prominently in the life of President Abraham Lincoln, of log-splitting legend.

Insignia of the 84th Infantry Division

Author(s): United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, DC

Sours: https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/content/en/article/the-84th-infantry-division
Greatest Stories of WW2: The 84th at the Siegfried Line - 720p

Just in case. - Well, okay, - taxi driver smiled, - I like you, I do not mind, just not for long, I still have to work. - Of course of course. Do as you like, do it, after all, we are adults. Having gone up with Lena to her apartment, and making sure that there is no catch, and Lena is really alone, the man noticeably perked up.

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Open your mouth bitch - he said, trying to squeeze a member into her closed mouth. Ill make it anyway, he said, then hit her in the face again and Katerina opened her mouth. The observing Anatol could not believe what was happening, Mikhalych held his daughter-in-law by the head and slowly fucked deeply immersing his fat.

Horseradish in her mouth. It could be seen how tears were flowing down her cheeks, the girl was gagging every now and then and Mikhalych.



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