Job 4:8 meaning

Job 4:8 meaning DEFAULT

Job 4:8 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Job 4:8, NIV: "As I have observed, those who plow evil and those who sow trouble reap it."

Job 4:8, ESV: "As I have seen, those who plow iniquity and sow trouble reap the same."

Job 4:8, KJV: "Even as I have seen, they that plow iniquity, and sow wickedness, reap the same."

Job 4:8, NASB: "According to what I have seen, those who plow wrongdoing And those who sow trouble harvest it."

Job 4:8, NLT: "My experience shows that those who plant trouble and cultivate evil will harvest the same."

Job 4:8, CSB: "In my experience, those who plow injustice and those who sow trouble reap the same."

Sours: https://www.bibleref.com/Job/4/Job-4-8.html

Job 4:8

“Even as I have seen, they that plow iniquity, and sow wickedness, reap the same.”

King James Version (KJV)

Euen as I haue seene, they that plow iniquity, and sow wickednsse, reape the same.
- King James Version (1611) - View 1611 Bible Scan

"According to what I have seen, those who plow iniquity And those who sow trouble harvest it.
- New American Standard Version (1995)

According as I have seen, they that plow iniquity, And sow trouble, reap the same.
- American Standard Version (1901)

What I have seen is that those by whom trouble has been ploughed, and evil planted, get the same for themselves.
- Basic English Bible

Even as I have seen, they that plough iniquity and sow mischief, reap the same.
- Darby Bible

Even as I have seen, they that plow iniquity, and sow wickedness, reap the same.
- Webster's Bible

According to what I have seen, those who plow iniquity, and sow trouble, reap the same.
- World English Bible

As I have seen -- ploughers of iniquity, And sowers of misery, reap it!
- Youngs Literal Bible

According as I have seen, they that plow iniquity, and sow mischief, reap the same.
- Jewish Publication Society Bible



Sours: https://www.kingjamesbibleonline.org/Job-4-8/
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Job 4:8

Job 4:8

Even as I have seen
Here he goes about to prove, by his own experience, the destruction of wicked men; and would intimate, that Job was such an one, because of the ruin he was fallen into:

they that plow iniquity, and sow wickedness, reap the same;
figurative expressions, denoting that such who devise iniquity in their hearts, form and plan schemes of it in their minds, signified by "plowing iniquity", and who were studious and diligent to put into practice what they devised; who took a great deal of pains to commit sin, and were constant at it, expressed by "sowing wickedness": these sooner or later eat the fruit of their doings, are punished in proportion to their crimes, even in this life, as well as hereafter, see ( Hosea 8:7 ) ( 10:13 ) ( Galatians 6:7Galatians 6:8 ) ; though a Jewish commentator F2 observes, that the thought of sin is designed by the first phrase; the endeavour to bring it into action by the second; and the finishing of the work, or the actual commission of the evil, by the third; the punishment thereof being what is expressed in ( Job 4:9 ) ; the Targum applies this to the generation of the flood.


Sours: https://www.biblestudytools.com/commentaries/gills-exposition-of-the-bible/job-4-8.html
Job 4-7 - The Eliphaz School of Biblical Counseling

EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(8) They that plow iniquity.—Comp. Galatians 6:7-8; and comp. also the strange expression of Isaiah 5:18.

Benson Commentary

Job 4:8. Even as I have seen, &c. — As thou hast never seen any example of a righteous man cut off, so I have seen many of wicked men cut off for their wickedness. They that plough, &c. — They that designedly work wickedness, first preparing themselves for it, and then continuing to execute it, as husbandmen first plough the ground, and then cast in the seed. See the margin. In other words, the observation I have made of such persons is, they are so far from reaping any advantage from their iniquitous practices, that those practices return on their own heads, and their sinful schemes and contrivances recoil wholly on themselves.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

4:7-11 Eliphaz argues, 1. That good men were never thus ruined. But there is one event both to the righteous and to the wicked, Ec 9:2, both in life and death; the great and certain difference is after death. Our worst mistakes are occasioned by drawing wrong views from undeniable truths. 2. That wicked men were often thus ruined: for the proof of this, Eliphaz vouches his own observation. We may see the same every day.

Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Even as I have seen - Eliphaz appeals to his own observation, that people who had led wicked lives were suddenly cut off. Instances of this kind he might doubtless have observed - as all may have done. But his inference was too broad when he concluded that all the wicked are punished in this manner. It is true that wicked people are thus cut off and perish; but it is not true that all the wicked are thus punished in this life, nor that any of the righteous are not visited with similar calamities. His reasoning was of a kind that is common in the world - that of drawing universal conclusions from premises that are too narrow to sustain them, or from too few carefully observed facts.

They that plow iniquity - This is evidently a proverbial expression; and the sense is, that as people sow they reap. If they sow wheat, they reap wheat; if barley, they reap barley; if tares, they reap tares. Thus, in Proverbs 22:8 :

"He that soweth iniquity shall reap also vanity."

So in Hosea 8:7 :

"For they have sown the wind,

And they shall reap the whirlwind:

It hath no stalk; the bud shall yield no meal

If so be it yield, strangers shall swallow it up"

Thus, in the Persian adage:

"He that planteth thorns shall not gather roses."

Dr. Good.

So Aeschylus:

Ἄτης ἄρουρα Θάνατον ἐκκαρπίζεται.

Atēs aroura thanaton ekkarpizetai.

continued...

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

8. they that plough iniquity … reap the same—(Pr 22:8; Ho 8:7; 10:13; Ga 6:7, 8).

Matthew Poole's Commentary

As thou hast never seen any example of a righteous man cut off, so on the contrary I have seen many examples of wicked men cut off for their wickedness. Or, As far as I have observed; or, But as I have seen or experienced.

They that plough iniquity, and sow wickedness; they that designedly and industriously work wickedness, first plotting and preparing themselves for it, and then continuing to pursue and execute it, as husbandmen first plough up and prepare the ground, and then cast in the seed. Compare Proverbs 22:8Hosea 10:13.

Reap the same, i.e. iniquity, or such trouble or injury (for so also the Hebrew word avert signifies) as they cause to others. Or, the fruit of their iniquity, the just recompence and punishment of it, which is oft called sin or iniquity, as Genesis 4:7Numbers 12:2 16:26 32:23. Compare Galatians 6:7,8.

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Even as I have seen,.... Here he goes about to prove, by his own experience, the destruction of wicked men; and would intimate, that Job was such an one, because of the ruin he was fallen into:

they that plow iniquity, and sow wickedness, reap the same; figurative expressions, denoting that such who devise iniquity in their hearts, form and plan schemes of it in their minds, signified by "plowing iniquity", and who were studious and diligent to put into practice what they devised; who took a great deal of pains to commit sin, and were constant at it, expressed by "sowing wickedness": these sooner or later eat the fruit of their doings, are punished in proportion to their crimes, even in this life, as well as hereafter, see Hosea 8:7Galatians 6:7; though a Jewish commentator (b) observes, that the thought of sin is designed by the first phrase; the endeavour to bring it into action by the second; and the finishing of the work, or the actual commission of the evil, by the third; the punishment thereof being what is expressed in Job 4:9; the Targum applies this to the generation of the flood.

(b) R. Simeon Bar Tzemach.

Geneva Study Bible

Even as I have seen, they that {e} plow iniquity, and sow wickedness, reap the same.

(e) They who do evil cannot but receive evil.

Sours: https://biblehub.com/commentaries/job/4-8.htm

Meaning job 4:8

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

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Job 4

"According to what I have seen, those who plow iniquity And those who sow trouble harvest it.
New American Standard Version

Jump to: Adam Clarke CommentaryBridgeway Bible CommentaryAlbert Barnes' Notes on the Whole BibleChuck Smith Bible CommentaryExpository Notes of Dr. Thomas ConstableJohn Gill's Exposition of the Whole BibleMatthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

Adam Clarke Commentary

Verse Job 4:8. They that plough iniquity — A proverbial form of speech drawn from nature. Whatever seed a man sows in the ground, he reaps the same kind; for every seed produces its like. Thus Solomon, Proverbs 22:8: "He that soweth iniquity shall reap vanity." And St. Paul, Galatians 6:7-8: "Be not deceived, God is not mocked; for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap. For he that soweth to his flesh, shall of the flesh reap corruption; but he who soweth to the Spirit, shall of the Spirit reap life everlasting." And of the same nature is that other saying of the apostle, He that soweth sparingly, shall reap sparingly, 2 Corinthians 9:6.

The same figure is employed by the Prophet Hosea Hosea 8:7: They have sown the wind, and they shall reap the whirlwind; and Hosea 10:12-13: Sow to yourselves in righteousness; reap in mercy. Ye haveploughed wickedness; ye have reaped iniquity. The last sentence contains, not only the same image, but almost the same words as those used by Eliphaz.

Our Lord expresses the same thing, in the following words: Matthew 7:16-18: Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles? Every goodtree bringeth forth good fruit, but a corrupt tree bringeth forthevil fruit. So the Greeks: -

Ατης αρουρα θανατον εκκαρπιζεται.

Aesch. Ἑπτα επι Θηβαις, ver. 607.

"The field of iniquity produces the fruit of death."

Ὑβρις γαρ εξανθους εκαρπωσε σταχυν

Ατης, ὁθεν παγκλαυτον εξαμᾳ θερος.

IB. Περσαι, ver. 823.

"For oppression, when it springs,

Puts forth the blade of vengeance; and its fruit

Yields a ripe harvest of repentant wo." - POTTER.

The image is common every where because it is a universal law of nature.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 4:8". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-4.html. 1832.

Bridgeway Bible Commentary


Eliphaz speaks (4:1-5:27)

The first of the three friends to speak is Eliphaz, who is probably the oldest of the three. He is also the least severe in the accusations brought against Job (4:1-2). He begins by noting that in the past Job comforted others in their troubles, but now that he has troubles himself, his faith has failed. If Job truly honoured God and was upright in his ways, there would be no need for this despondency (3-6). The person who is innocent, argues Eliphaz, need not fear suffering or death. Such calamities are God’s judgment on wrongdoing, and not even the strongest or most defiant person can withstand his judgment (7-11).
Eliphaz now tells of a hair-raising vision he saw one night (12-16). (It becomes clear, as we read Eliphaz’s speeches, that this vision has become for him a standard by which he judges others.) The main point that Eliphaz learnt from his vision was that no person can be righteous before God. If angels, who live in the heavenly realm, are imperfect, how much more imperfect must human beings be who live on the earth (17-19). Their brief lives comes to an inglorious end, like a tent that collapses when its cords are cut (20-21).
According to Eliphaz, it is useless for Job to expect the angels to support his protest against God’s laws (5:1). The person who rebels against God in such bitterness is a fool and will only get himself into more trouble. His house may be destroyed, his sons convicted of lawbreaking, or his fields plundered by raiders (2-5). For Eliphaz, this shows that suffering does not spring up by itself. Suffering is caused by a person’s sin, just as sparks are caused by a fire (6-7).
In summary, Eliphaz’s suggestion is that if he were in Job’s position he would stop complaining and leave the whole matter in God’s hands, for he has infinite wisdom and power (8-10). God blesses the humble and the needy, though he opposes those who think they are clever (11-16). The sufferings God uses to punish and correct people are likened to wounds. He will heal the wounds of those who submit to him (17-18). He will then bless them with protection from famine and from enemies (19-22); wild beasts will not destroy their flocks or herds (23-24); their families will multiply, and they will die contented in old age (25-26). Such is Eliphaz’s advice, based on much research, and he suggests that Job accept it (27).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliographical Information
Flemming, Donald C. "Commentary on Job 4:8". "Brideway Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bbc/job-4.html. 2005.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Even as I have seen - Eliphaz appeals to his own observation, that people who had led wicked lives were suddenly cut off. Instances of this kind he might doubtless have observed - as all may have done. But his inference was too broad when he concluded that all the wicked are punished in this manner. It is true that wicked people are thus cut off and perish; but it is not true that all the wicked are thus punished in this life, nor that any of the righteous are not visited with similar calamities. His reasoning was of a kind that is common in the world - that of drawing universal conclusions from premises that are too narrow to sustain them, or from too few carefully observed facts.

They that plow iniquity - This is evidently a proverbial expression; and the sense is, that as people sow they reap. If they sow wheat, they reap wheat; if barley, they reap barley; if tares, they reap tares. Thus, in Proverbs 22:8 :

“He that soweth iniquity shall reap also vanity.”

So in Hosea 8:7 :

“For they have sown the wind,

And they shall reap the whirlwind:

It hath no stalk; the bud shall yield no meal

If so be it yield, strangers shall swallow it up”

Thus, in the Persian adage:

“He that planteth thorns shall not gather roses.”

Dr. Good.

So Aeschylus:

Atēsarourathanatonekkarpizetai.

The field of wrong brings forth death as its fruit.

The meaning of Eliphaz is, that people who form plans of wickedness must reap appropriate fruits. They cannot expect that an evil life will produce ultimate happiness.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 4:8". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-4.html. 1870.

Chuck Smith Bible Commentary

Chapter 4

So Job has made his complaint, and so Eliphaz, his friend who came to comfort him, he said,

If we attempt to talk to you, will you be grieved? [But really after what you've said] who can keep silent? [He said,] Behold, you have instructed many people, you have strengthened weak hands. Your words have held up the person who was falling, and you have strengthened feeble knees. But now when it comes to you, you faint; it touches you, and you are troubled ( Job 4:3-5 ).

Uh-oh, those are nice words to hear, aren't they? From a friend who has come to comfort you in all your misery. "Well, you know, great one you are. You were counseling and lifting up others. Your words held them up and all and you were going around doing this. But now it comes to you, look what happens, man, you faint. You go under."

Is not this thy fear, thy confidence, thy hope, and the uprightness of thy ways? Remember, I pray thee, what innocent man ever perished? ( Job 4:6-7 )

You see, already he's beginning to get the knife out. "Job, you're not innocent. What innocent man ever perished?" Well, let me tell you this. Many innocent men have perished. There's not really good logic to what Eliphaz is saying at all. In fact, the most innocent of all men was crucified. So there really isn't sound wisdom in what Eliphaz is saying. It's just the argumentations of men which often lack real wisdom.

Even as I have seen, they that plow iniquity, and sow wickedness, reap the same ( Job 4:8 ).

So Job, you're just getting what you reap, what you sowed. You're reaping it now. Those that sow iniquity and wickedness, they reap the same.

By the blast of God they perish, and by the breath of his nostrils they are consumed. The roaring of the lion, and the voice of the fierce lion, and the teeth of the young lions, are broken. The old lion perisheth for lack of prey, and the stout lion's whelps are scattered abroad ( Job 4:9-11 ).

Now, he said, he gets all mystic.

Now a thing was secretly brought to me, and my ear received a little of it. In thoughts from the visions of the night, when deep sleep had fallen upon men, Fear came upon me, and trembling, it made all my bones shake. A spirit passed before my face; and the hair on my flesh stood up: And it stood still, but I could not discern the form of it: an image was before my eyes, there was silence, and I heard a voice, saying, Shall mortal man be more just than God? shall a man be more pure than his Maker? Behold, he put no trust in his servants; and his angels he charged with folly ( Job 4:12-18 ):

So the guy comes off now super spiritual. Have you ever had those people come around super spiritual, you know, when you're in trouble? And you know, visions and dreams and voices of angels, and spirits and all, and this oohh thing, you know. So here is old Eliphaz, "When other men were asleep, a deep sleep in the night, the spirit passed by. I could tell it was there. I couldn't tell the form. Began to speak, you know. He charged his angels with folly."

How much less in those that dwell in houses of clay ( Job 4:19 ),

Interesting and picturesque phrase of our body, a house of clay. But in the New Testament it said, "We have a treasure in this earthen vessel" ( 2 Corinthians 4:7 ). Same thing. In this house of clay there's a fabulous treasure, for God is dwelling in this house of clay. "Know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost which is in you?" ( 1 Corinthians 3:16 ) And we have this glorious treasure, he said, in these earthen vessels. That the glory... God has put a lot of treasure in this dumb clay pot in order that the glory will always go to God, not to the clay pot. I'm just the vessel, but I have the capacity to contain the wealthiest treasure in the world, even God will dwell within my life. But it is ridiculous; it is ludicrous to put something of such great value in such a common container. Just a clay pot. But God has done it, that the glory will not be in the vessel but in the contents. Now, it is always pathetic and sad and tragic when the clay pot tries to get the glory and tries to draw attention and glory to itself, rather than to the One who dwells within doing the work. So I love this, it's very picturesque. Men who dwell in houses of clay, talking about our body.

whose foundation is the dust, which are crushed before the moth? They are destroyed from morning to evening: they perish for ever without any regarding it. Doth not their excellency which is in them go away? they die, even without wisdom ( Job 4:19-21 ). "

Copyright Statement
Copyright © 2014, Calvary Chapel of Costa Mesa, Ca.

Bibliographical Information
Smith, Charles Ward. "Commentary on Job 4:8". "Chuck Smith Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/csc/job-4.html. 2014.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Eliphaz’s view of suffering 4:7-11

This is one of the clearest expressions of Eliphaz’s view of why people suffer and his view of the basis for the divine-human relationship (Job 4:7). He believed good people always win and the bad always lose. He was asserting that Job’s sins were finding him out. Bildad and Zophar shared this conclusion, but experience does not support it, as Job pointed out later. Eliphaz also explained the basis for his arguments: personal experience (Job 4:8). Unfortunately, any one person’s individual experience is too limited to provide enough data with which to answer the great questions Job and his friends discussed.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliographical Information
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Job 4:8". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/job-4.html. 2012.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Even as I have seen,.... Here he goes about to prove, by his own experience, the destruction of wicked men; and would intimate, that Job was such an one, because of the ruin he was fallen into:

they that plow iniquity, and sow wickedness, reap the same; figurative expressions, denoting that such who devise iniquity in their hearts, form and plan schemes of it in their minds, signified by "plowing iniquity", and who were studious and diligent to put into practice what they devised; who took a great deal of pains to commit sin, and were constant at it, expressed by "sowing wickedness": these sooner or later eat the fruit of their doings, are punished in proportion to their crimes, even in this life, as well as hereafter, see Hosea 8:7Galatians 6:7; though a Jewish commentator b observes, that the thought of sin is designed by the first phrase; the endeavour to bring it into action by the second; and the finishing of the work, or the actual commission of the evil, by the third; the punishment thereof being what is expressed in Job 4:9; the Targum applies this to the generation of the flood.

b R. Simeon Bar Tzemach.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 4:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-4.html. 1999.

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

      7 Remember, I pray thee, who ever perished, being innocent? or where were the righteous cut off?   8 Even as I have seen, they that plow iniquity, and sow wickedness, reap the same.   9 By the blast of God they perish, and by the breath of his nostrils are they consumed.   10 The roaring of the lion, and the voice of the fierce lion, and the teeth of the young lions, are broken.   11 The old lion perisheth for lack of prey, and the stout lion's whelps are scattered abroad.

      Eliphaz here advances another argument to prove Job a hypocrite, and will have not only his impatience under his afflictions to be evidence against him but even his afflictions themselves, being so very great and extraordinary, and there being no prospect at all of his deliverance out of them. To strengthen his argument he here lays down these two principles, which seem plausible enough:--

      I. That good men were never thus ruined. For the proof of this he appeals to Job's own observation (Job 4:7; Job 4:7): "Remember, I pray thee; recollect all that thou hast seen, heard, or read, and give me an instance of any one that was innocent and righteous, and yet perished as thou dost, and was cut off as thou art." If we understand it of a final and eternal destruction, his principle is true. None that are innocent and righteous perish for ever: it is only a man of sin that is a son of perdition,2 Thessalonians 2:3. But then it is ill applied to Job; he did not thus perish, nor was he cut off: a man is never undone till he is in hell. But, if we understand it of any temporal calamity, his principle is not true. The righteous perish (Isaiah 57:1): there is one event both to the righteous and to the wicked (Ecclesiastes 9:2), both in life and death; the great and certain difference is after death. Even before Job's time (as early as it was) there were instances sufficient to contradict this principle. Did not righteous Abel perish being innocent? and was he not cut off in the beginning of his days? Was not righteous Lot burnt out of house and harbour, and forced to retire to a melancholy cave? Was not righteous Jacob a Syrian ready to perish?Deuteronomy 26:5. Other such instances, no doubt, there were, which are not on record.

      II. That wicked men were often thus ruined. For the proof of this he vouches his own observation (Job 4:8; Job 4:8): "Even as I have seen, many a time, those that plough iniquity, and sow wickedness, reap accordingly; by the blast of God they perish,Job 4:9; Job 4:9. We have daily instances of that; and therefore, since thou dost thus perish and art consumed, we have reason to think that, whatever profession of religion thou hast made, thou hast but ploughed iniquity and sown wickedness. Even as I have seen in others, so do I see in thee."

      1. He speaks of sinners in general, politic busy sinners, that take pains in sin, for they plough iniquity; and expect gain by sin, for they sow wickedness. Those that plough plough in hope, but what is the issue? They reap the same. They shall of the flesh reap corruption and ruin, Galatians 6:7; Galatians 6:8. The harvest will be a heap in the day of grief and desperate sorrow,Isaiah 17:11. He shall reap the same, that is, the proper product of that seedness. That which the sinner sows, he sows not that body that shall be, but God will give it a body, a body of death, the end of those things,Romans 6:21. Some, by iniquity and wickedness, understand wrong and injury done to others. Those who plough and sow them shall reap the same, that is, they shall be paid in their own coin. Those who are troublesome shall be troubled, 2 Thessalonians 1:6; Joshua 7:25. The spoilers shall be spoiled (Isaiah 33:1), and those that led captive shall go captive,Revelation 13:10. He further describes their destruction (Job 4:9; Job 4:9): By the blast of God they perish. The projects they take so much pains in are defeated; God cuts asunder the cords of those ploughers, Psalms 129:3; Psalms 129:4. They themselves are destroyed, which is the just punishment of their iniquity. They perish, that is, they are destroyed utterly; they are consumed, that is, they are destroyed gradually; and this by the blast and breath of God, that is, (1.) By his wrath. His anger is the ruin of sinners, who are therefore called vessels of wrath, and his breath is said to kindle Tophet,Isaiah 30:33. Who knows the power of his anger?Psalms 90:11. (2.) By his word. He speaks and it is done, easily and effectually. The Spirit of God, in the word, consumes sinners; with that he slays them, Hosea 6:5. Saying and doing are not two things with God. The man of sin is said to be consumed with the breath of Christ's mouth,2 Thessalonians 2:8; Isaiah 11:4; Revelation 19:21. Some think that in attributing the destruction of sinners to the blast of God, and the breath of his nostrils, he refers to the wind which blew the house down upon Job's children, as if they were therefore sinners above all men because they suffered such things.Luke 13:2.

      2. He speaks particularly of tyrants and cruel oppressors, under the similitude of lions, Job 4:10; Job 4:11. Observe, (1.) How he describes their cruelty and oppression. The Hebrew tongue has five several names for lions, and they are all here used to set forth the terrible tearing power, fierceness, and cruelty, of proud oppressors. They roar, and rend, and prey upon all about them, and bring up their young ones to do so too, Ezekiel 19:3. The devil is a roaring lion; and they partake of his nature, and do his lusts. They are strong as lions, and subtle (Psalms 10:9; Psalms 17:12); and, as far as they prevail, they lay all desolate about them. (2.) How he describes their destruction, the destruction both of their power and of their persons. They shall be restrained from doing further hurt and reckoned with for the hurt they have done. An effectual course shall be taken, [1.] That they shall not terrify. The voice of their roaring shall be stopped. [2.] That they shall not tear. God will disarm them, will take away their power to do hurt: The teeth of the young lions are broken. See Psalms 3:7. Thus shall the remainder of wrath be restrained. [3.] That they shall not enrich themselves with the spoil of their neighbours. Even the old lion is famished, and perishes for lack of prey. Those that have surfeited on spoil and rapine are perhaps reduced to such straits as to die of hunger at last. [4.] That they shall not, as they promise themselves, leave a succession: The stout lion's whelps are scattered abroad, to seek for food themselves, which the old ones used to bring in for them, Nahum 2:12. The lion did tear in pieces for his whelps, but now they must shift for themselves. Perhaps Eliphaz intended, in this, to reflect upon Job, as if he, being the greatest of all the men of the east, had got his estate by spoil and used his power in oppressing his neighbours, but now his power and estate were gone, and his family was scattered: if so, it was a pity that a man whom God praised should be thus abused.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliographical Information
Henry, Matthew. "Complete Commentary on Job 4:8". "Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/job-4.html. 1706.

Sours: https://www.studylight.org/commentary/job/4-8.html
Job 4: Eliphaz Responds to Job - Pastor Roger Jimenez

Job 4 – The First Speech of Eliphaz

This begins a long section in the Book of Job where Job’s friends counsel him and he answers them. His friends speak in more or less three rounds, with each speech followed by a reply from Job. At the end of these speeches, God answers Job and his friends and settles the matter.

A. The opening comments of Eliphaz.

1. (1-6) Eliphaz calls upon Job to remember the advice he has given to others as a helper of the weak.

Then Eliphaz the Temanite answered and said:
“If one attempts a word with you, will you become weary?
But who can withhold himself from speaking?
Surely you have instructed many,
And you have strengthened weak hands.
Your words have upheld him who was stumbling,
And you have strengthened the feeble knees;
But now it comes upon you, and you are weary;
It touches you, and you are troubled.
Is not your reverence your confidence?
And the integrity of your ways your hope?”

a. Then Eliphaz the Temanite answered: Eliphaz was from Teman, an Edomite city that was known as a center of wisdom (Jeremiah 49:7).

b. If one attempts a word with you, will you become weary: With this tactful beginning, Eliphaz began his speech. We may say that he had earned the right to speak to Job, because in a remarkable display of friendship, he sat wordless with Job through a whole week to show his sympathy and brotherhood with the afflicted man (Job 2:11-13).

c. But who can withhold himself from speaking: Eliphaz felt compelled to speak; his love and concern for Job strongly motivated him to help his suffering friend. Nevertheless, it will be later found that the advice of Eliphaz and the rest of Job’s counselors was wrong (Job 42:7-8).

d. Surely you have instructed many… now it comes upon you, and you are weary: Eliphaz began to confront Job with what he saw as his problem. This took a great deal of courage on the part of Eliphaz; he was the first one to speak, and he spoke to a man with an enviable reputation for godliness and one suffering from terrible calamity.

i. Yet he pointed at this apparent contradiction in Job’s lament recorded in the previous chapter: That this man who had taught and comforted many in their time of need now seems to despair in his own time of need.

ii. “Already there is insinuation that Job is unable to apply to himself what he preached to others.” (Andersen)

iii. “This is galling. But hitherto Eliphaz had commended Job; now he dasheth all, and draweth a black line over that he had spoken once. To commend a man with a but is a wound instead of a commendation… it sprinkleth black upon white, and so smutteth a man’s good name, which is slander in a high degree.” (Trapp)

e. Is not your reverence your confidence: This has the idea of, “Job, does not your despair show that you have lost confidence in your reverence and lost hope in the integrity of your ways?”

i. “Men are best known by affliction, and this now showeth of what metal thou art made; for now thou doth cast off thy fear of God, and all thy confidence and hope in him.” (Trapp)

ii. This begins a section where Eliphaz (and others) will try to make Job see that his problems have come upon him because of some sin on his part, and that he should confess and repent of his sin in order to be restored.

iii. Eliphaz began on the basis of Job’s complaint as recorded in Job 3. He reasoned that Job would not complain in this way unless he was in some way guilty; that his guilty conscience was the root of his suffering. As it turned out, this was a false assumption. Job’s complaint was simply the cry of a life in pain and not because Job consciously or unconsciously understood that he deserved this calamity because of his sin.

2. (7-11) Eliphaz explains what he believed to be the source of Job’s troubles.

“Remember now, who ever perished being innocent?
Or where were the upright ever cut off?
Even as I have seen,
Those who plow iniquity
And sow trouble reap the same.
By the blast of God they perish,
And by the breath of His anger they are consumed.
The roaring of the lion,
The voice of the fierce lion,
And the teeth of the young lions are broken.
The old lion perishes for lack of prey,
And the cubs of the lioness are scattered.”

a. Who ever perished being innocent: Here Eliphaz came to the heart of his argument. He boldly said that Job was guilty of some sin because the innocent do not suffer as he had, and the upright are not cut off as he was.

i. In this context, cut off means to be forsaken by God and goodness. Later in Israel, it would often mean to be executed.

b. Those who plow iniquity and sow trouble reap the same: Eliphaz spoke convincingly from his own experience (Even as I have seen). Job was reaping trouble, so he must have plowed sin (iniquity) and sown the seeds of trouble.

i. The counsel of Eliphaz is full of common sense and rooted in his own observations and experience. We might even say that it is mostly true and can be commonly seen as true. Nevertheless, we also know that in Job’s case he was wrong, and this was the wrong counsel (remembering God’s assessment of Eliphaz and Job’s counselors in Job 42:7).

ii. Many people today believe the counsel of Eliphaz and believe it as an absolute spiritual law instead of a general principle. Some take the passage from Galatians 6:7: Do not be deceived, God is not mocked; whatever a man sows, that he will also reap. Yet it is important to understand the context of Paul’s statement, which was encouragement and exhortation for Christians to give materially for the support of their ministers. It is true that the principle of Galatians 6:7 has application beyond giving and supporting teachers and ministers. It has a general application in life; what we get out is often what we put in. Yet Paul did not promote some law of spiritual karma that ensures we will get good when we do good things or always get bad when we do bad things. If there were such an absolute spiritual law, it would surely damn us all. Instead, Paul simply related the principle of sowing and reaping to the way we manage our resources before the Lord. He used the same picture in 1 Corinthians 9:11 and 2 Corinthians 9:6-10.

iii. Job and his friends have built their whole life on the belief that God helps the good and hinders the bad; that in fact God can be seen as morally good in the affairs of men. “The friends must infer from Job’s suffering that he has sinned; Job must infer from his innocence that God is unjust.” (Andersen)

c. By the blast of God they perish: Eliphaz here clearly implied that Job’s suffering came as the judgment of God against him; that the breath of His anger burned against Job.

i. The idea is also that the mere breath of His anger is enough to destroy God’s foes. “He puts himself to no great pain to punish them; but blows them away as so many dust-heaps.” (Trapp)

d. The teeth of the young lions are broken: Eliphaz painted the picture of how strong the anger of God is, that it is strong enough to humble and defeat even strong young lions. The idea is that the anger of God has also brought Job low.

B. A revelation regarding the frailty of man.

1. (12-16) A spirit comes to Eliphaz by night.

“Now a word was secretly brought to me,
And my ear received a whisper of it.
In disquieting thoughts from the visions of the night,
When deep sleep falls on men,
Fear came upon me, and trembling,
Which made all my bones shake.
Then a spirit passed before my face;
The hair on my body stood up.
It stood still,
But I could not discern its appearance.
A form was before my eyes;
There was silence;
Then I heard a voice saying:

a. A word was secretly brought to me: Eliphaz claimed that he received this word in a dream, when deep sleep falls on men, and he received it by a spirit that passed before his face in his dream.

i. “Eliphaz bolstered the authority of his words by an appeal to the supernatural – an eerie and hair-raising experience in which he received a divine oracle.” (Smick)

b. A spirit passed before my face: The words in the following section came to Eliphaz from this strange and mysterious spirit.

i. “Whether it came from heaven or hell, we know not, for its communication shows and rankles a wound, without providing a cure.” (Clarke)

2. (17-21) What the spirit said.

‘Can a mortal be more righteous than God?
Can a man be more pure than his Maker?
If He puts no trust in His servants,
If He charges His angels with error,
How much more those who dwell in houses of clay,
Whose foundation is in the dust,
Who are crushed before a moth?
They are broken in pieces from morning till evening;
They perish forever, with no one regarding.
Does not their own excellence go away?
They die, even without wisdom.’“

a. Can a mortal be more righteous than God: Eliphaz called attention to the common sinfulness of man. The idea is clear: “Job, we all sin. There is no great shame in admitting that you have sinned and that is why this calamity has come upon you.”

b. If He charges His angels with error, how much more those who dwell in houses of clay: Eliphaz made this interesting comment to point out man’s spiritual and moral frailty. He noted that even angels had fallen into error, therefore it should surprise no one that man – including Job – has also fallen into error.

i. This statement hit closer to the real truth than Eliphaz could know. It was one of these angels charged with error – Satan himself – who was the real cause of Job’s calamity. Satan also led a large number of angelic beings into rebellion against God (Revelation 12:4, 12:9). The Bible also says that in the age to come, redeemed man will in some way judge these fallen angels (1 Corinthians 6:3). Eliphaz was correct on this point: He charges His angels with error.

ii. “It is all very beautiful, but absolutely short-sighted. Eliphaz had no knowledge of those secret councils in heaven, and was making the mistake of attempting to press all things into the compass of his philosophy.” (Morgan)

iii. “The speaker seems serenely unconscious that he was saying anything that could drive a knife into the tortured man. He is so carried along on the waves of his own eloquence, and so absorbed in the stringing together the elements of an artistic whole, that he forgets the very sorrows which he came to comfort.” (Maclaren)

©2019 David Guzik – No distribution beyond personal use without permission

Sours: https://enduringword.com/bible-commentary/job-4/

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Verse  (Click for Chapter)

New International Version
As I have observed, those who plow evil and those who sow trouble reap it.

English Standard Version
As I have seen, those who plow iniquity and sow trouble reap the same.

Berean Study Bible
As I have observed, those who plow iniquity and those who sow trouble reap the same.

King James Bible
Even as I have seen, they that plow iniquity, and sow wickedness, reap the same.

New American Standard Bible
"According to what I have seen, those who plow iniquity And those who sow trouble harvest it.

American Standard Version
According as I have seen, they that plow iniquity, And sow trouble, reap the same.

Darby Bible Translation
Even as I have seen, they that plough iniquity and sow mischief, reap the same.

Douay-Rheims Bible
On the contrary I have seen those who work iniquity, and sow sorrows, and reap them,

English Revised Version
According as I have seen, they that plow iniquity, and sow trouble, reap the same.

Young's Literal Translation
As I have seen -- ploughers of iniquity, And sowers of misery, reap it!

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