Class c rv cab seal

Class c rv cab seal DEFAULT



Water Damage Repair Part I:
When Things Get Wet In The
Wrong Places

We experienced some water damage to our rig last January while staying at the Sonoma Coast State Beach (Wright's Beach). Standing outside of the vehicle and looking above the passenger side door I noticed a problem with water intrusion on my Class C Tioga. This is not where you want to find yourself having to perform roof leak repairs.

Roof Leaks Cause Water Contamination And
Damage In Your Class C Motorhome


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This water leak created a 1/2 inch separation of the fiberglass floor from the side trim piece. This resulted in the floor being pushed down and away, leaving an unsightly gap. We had rain the night before, but just a small amount. Therefore, I'm thinking this was a problem that had been going on for awhile.

The rain became steady, and we decided it was time to head back to Sacramento.

This is a 118-mile drive, so I was hoping that we could duck in between showers.

As a precaution against further water damage from this roof leak, I used a strip of EternaBond tape to make a temporary repair... I sealed it up as best as I could and made a run for it.

Side View Before Repair (WD Repair 1)



Our luck was not good, though. Not only did it rain, it poured all the way home. It also rained most of the next month. I was reduced to putting a tarp on the thing and waiting until the weather improved before I could see the extent of the water damage. Needless to say, I was nervous because I really didn't know just where the leak that caused the water damage was coming from.

An Overpressure Test Will Show If Potential Leaks
Are Present... But Be Careful


I did take my RV down to a local RV service center where they performed an overpressure test on the thing. It was pretty much a useless waste of time because the only information I got back was that it was a "leaker". They wanted something like $3,500.00 to "fix it". I asked for a report showing exactly where it was leaking, but I just received what looked like a parts breakdown on the cost of repair. After it was all said and done, it seemed that their major focus was on selling me a new vehicle. I wasn't impressed.

I am only bringing this up because I feel that a good way to determine where water can penetrate any recreational vehicle is through the process of over pressuring the unit. It is a simple matter of creating 1 or 2 pounds per sq. inches of atmospheric pressure differential inside the unit and then applying soap and water through a sprayer mechanism on the outside seams. In theory, if there is a potential water damaging leak, then air bubbles will form along the fault line. Like I said, it is simple in theory. I have some ideas on how to develop such a water leak detection test.

When You Bump Into Things, You May End Up
Having Some Water Damage Issues


As far as my leak was concerned, when the sun finally came out and the rain stopped long enough to begin the repair process, I removed the tarp and looked things over.

Collision Damage  (WD Repair 8)



The previous owners appeared to have damaged the front right corner of the cab-over by colliding with something. A repair was attempted to prevent water damage, but the external caulking that had been applied may not have been up to the task of maintaining a water barrier. Upon removing the trim piece, I also discovered more that a few screws had rusted out. It was a mess.

The graphic above shows where the fiberglass was damaged. This appears to have resulted in the swelling caused by water penetration.

When Buying ANY RV... New Or Used. Look It Over VERY Carefully For Signs Of Water Contamination


Some of the the swelling you see in the graphic above was already on the unit when I bought the thing. At the time I figured that it had leaked; and after the water damage had occurred, it had been repaired. This analysis was based on the fact that there was nothing on the inside showing water damage issues. All my inside panels were, and still are, dry and firm.

Knowing what I know now, I would not have purchased this RV. However, it was inexpensive, and it is serving it's purpose. This unit has enabled me to learn a lot about motorhomes.


One of the key lessons learned about a designed water barrier is that if the motor home is put together properly, there is much less of a chance for it to sustain water damage from a leak.

The bottom line is that the engineering designs on most recreational vehicles are good. However, the manufacturers sometimes drop the ball on assembly.

As an example, when we pulled off the trim piece on the damaged corner, we noticed that when it was assembled, the trim was not configured to sit flush with the radius of the curve. There was about a one-inch gap that prevented a proper seal.



Believe it or not, I read an opinion about this in a magazine on airplanes. The writer made the case that people who assemble and maintain airplanes have a love of their craft while people who assemble motorhomes are semi-skilled employees resulting in a greater potential of reduced standards. I'm not sure that I buy all of his logic, but the industry does, on occasion, have issues with substandard products.

I feel that when purchasing a unit, you want to look at the small things. It is easy to get overwhelmed with the glitz. You want to look to see if the cabinet doors align properly. Are the plumbing fixtures on straight? These are samples of possible manufacturing sloppiness.Look at the screws on the outside trim pieces. Were they "rounded out" during assembly? Did the manufacturer use screws or staples to put the interior together? It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out which process will hold up the longest.



If You Are Going To Do Your Own Leak Repair Project... It Pays To Get A Second Opinion


Anyway, back to the repair. I'm going to say up front that in almost every situation, two minds are better than one. I probably would not have enjoyed a successful conclusion to this water damage repair project if I did not have the counsel and assistance of my friend, Brian. Brian enjoys a good knack for out of the box thinking and the tools to back up his ideas. He has so many "tool toys", that he puts his garage together like a jig-saw puzzle. Simply amazing. Brian rules the garage, and his wife rules the house. I just do what I'm told... I have a wife, two daughters, two grand daughters, and a female cat. At least I'm well fed!



Due to the rain that delayed the repair on my water damaged class C, we had a lot of time to think about after market repair products. We kind of mapped out what we thought needed to be done. We compiled a list of what tools and supplies we would need to complete the water damage repair.

Whenever I am attempting a project like this, I want to spend a good amount of time just thinking things over. The last thing I want to do is jump in without having a solid plan.


Information Is Key... Read The RV Blogs On-Line. Don't Forget Marine Applications... Yachts Are Just Motorhomes That Float


Brian is a boat owner, therefore, he is always over at West Marine looking at stuff. On one of his trips, he noticed a wide variety of epoxy. After bringing this to my attention, we decided to check it out.

It turns out that West Marine carries a selection of WEST SYSTEM epoxies. We concluded that WEST SYSTEM's G-Flex 650 epoxy would be a suitable epoxy to repair my water damaged Class C. It may even make it structurally better than new! I think this is true in large part due to the waterproofing nature of epoxy when applied to wood.

G-Flex 650 is very new stuff... it was introduced in June, 2007. What makes this epoxy appealing to us was its modulus of elasticity. It has a grip of 150,000 psi (pounds per square inch). WEST SYSTEM's number one selling Epoxy, the 105 series, has a modulus number of 405,000 psi grip.

This relates because G-Flex has nearly the same creep (creep shows how long an epoxy will sustain a load without separation) with much enhanced tensile elongation (five to six times the tensile elongation of WEST SYSTEM 105). Tensile elongation is a simple measuring term determining how much movement can be absorbed before shearing, or breaking apart.



So, how do all of these numbers relate to a repair project on a water damaged motorhome? Well, we needed something that would return the underlying sub frame wood back to its original integrity. G-Flex has the ability to:

  • glue water damaged damp woods. It can be used on wet surfaces, even underwater when applied with specific instructions.

  • make structural bonds that can absorb the stresses of expansion, contraction, shock, and vibration.

  • adhere tenaciously to difficult-to-glue hardwoods.

  • bond well to a variety of materials, including dissimilar ones such as metals, plastics, glass, masonry, and fiberglass.

With the above information, we decided there was a good chance the old motorhome would not shake itself apart as we drove down the road.



Use The Internet... Can You Find A Good
Information Sources For Hardware


Okay! We felt good about the epoxy. However, we still needed some type of insulation tape. I did not want to use plumber's tape because I knew it would become hard and brittle after a period of time. So, I looked online at 3-M.

We got lucky and found another new product recently developed by 3-M. They had just introduced a new weather ribbon seal. The stuff is pretty cool, it will stay pliable over the long haul. This is a quality that will prove to be very effective for our purpose.

I ended up using a supplier out of Sacramento, CA, called R. S. Hughes Company. I bought a roll of 3-M's weather ribbon seal. It was 1" wide and, as you can see below, matched perfectly with the existing trim piece.

Weather Insulation  (WD Repair 4)



The last piece of the puzzle was finding a substitute for silicone. Although silicone has good sealing qualities, it becomes a real bugger when it is time to replace it. This is because silicone does not stick to itself, so it must be cleaned completely off whatever surface that must be sealed. Chemical removal helps, but it always boils down to a lot of elbow grease.

I used a commercial silicone removal product to get the big pieces off. But, I found a common wet sanding sponge worked best to remove it entirely. I really don't like silicone.

I finished completing the final caulking with a Geocel product call PRO FLEX. Bottom line, it has all the sealing qualities of silicone, but it is capable of being reapplied to itself, or even painted, after it dries.

One hundred stainless screws were used to replace the original factory screws and a 4' X 4' X 3/4" plywood board was used to help brace the repair area when applying epoxy.



Have You Completed a Project on Your Rig?


Maybe you have also completed a project that came out well. EVERYONE likes to hear success stories! In fact, the feedback that I've received on my project indicates that many of my on-line readers are searching for information about projects to help them modify or repair their rigs.

So, maybe you have a story to tell... it doesn't have to be about a water damage repair. If YOU have done something to your rig… whether it is a repair project, or even some type of modification to improve the usability of your home on wheels, other people will be interested.

Besides, if you want to describe and submit your project using the form below, I will give you YOUR OWN WEB PAGE to display your handiwork on. Be sure to use pictures, too (if you have them). Just tell a story about what is being shown.

Share your Motorhome Ideas, Plans, and Projects with Other Motorhome Enthusiasts!

We would love to hear about your motorhome projects… anything that other motorhome enthusiasts might enjoy or find educational:

* Any projects with unexpected outcomes... stuff that happens when it wasn’t in the plans.

* Unique ideas or accomplishments that were a huge success… or simply something that solved a problem.

* Did something break down on your last trip? You may have some unique advice for a fellow traveler.

* We are all looking for good repair facilities. Have you had good experiences with any repair services?

* Don’t forget the before and after pictures that tell a story!

What Other Visitors Have Said

See what projects other visitors have completed on their Class C Motorhmomes!


Leave RV Repair: Part I And Go To Repair Project Part II



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Leave Water Damage Repair: Part I and return To RV Repair: Sooner Or Later, Something Is Going To Need Fixing!

Leave Water Damage Repair: Part I And Return To The Class C Motorhome: How To Achieve The Maximum RV Lifestyle!

Sours: http://www.class-c-motorhome-info-made-simple.com/water_damage.html

With the help of industry experts at Hallmark RV and Parkview RV, Truck Camper Magazine inspects, caulks, seals and SealTech tests their 11-year old project truck camper.

Long before we took ownership of our used truck camper, we were making plans to check and fix the roof and side seals.  We have seen one too many RVs at repair shops with extensive damage from a water leak.  If there was anything we could do, we were not going to let that happen to our camper.

Also on our short list was removing the brand decals, something we thought would be relatively simple.  It wasn’t difficult, but removing the brand decals brought its own ghosts, literally.

The following article is meant partially as a follow-up and further detail to our 2010 article, Maintaining Camper Seals.  We recommend reading both articles before proceeding with your own caulk and seal maintenance.

Seal Team Sikaflex 715 and 521

With the decals removed, and the filon de-oxidized, the next step was to caulk and seal our camper.  Having been to all the factories, we knew we wanted to use Sikaflex 715 for our TPO rubber roof, and Sikaflex 521 (we have also used Sikaflex 505 – ordered from Amazon and that works well) for the exterior filon.

Sikaflex was first brought to our attention by Bob Mehrer of Snowriver in 2007.  Bob had tested various sealants and had concluded that Sikaflex was the best.  In 2010, Mony Penn of Eagle Cap had also tested Sikaflex and was using it exclusively on Eagle Cap campers for the same reason.  Other industry veterans over the years had told us much the same; Sikaflex was expensive, but worth it.

TIP: In our, “Maintaining Camper Seals” article, Mike Kernagis, Service Manager for Palomino RV, recommended Dicor self-leveling sealant for TPO rubber roofs, and Geocel MHRV for exterior filon.  Dicor and Geocel are what most RV manufacturers use at their factories and are less expensive alternatives to Sikaflex.

Help From Hallmark RV

Over the years, we have observed dozens of people caulking and sealing truck camper roofs and side walls but had never actually done it ourselves.  For expert advice on how to properly caulk and seal our truck camper, we went to Bill Ward, President of Hallmark RV.

Our original plan was to remove all of the existing sealant and replace it with new Sikaflex 715 and 521 sealant.  Bill suggested another approach.  From experience, he advised not removing the original seals unless they were damaged or compromised.

Bill said, “Why mess with a good seal?  You could end up doing more damage than good.  If some of the seals are in good shape, leave them alone.”

We had envisioned a completely re-caulked and sealed camper, but the real goal was to prevent water intrusion, not to seal for sealant’s sake.  Besides, not everyone has the time or inclination to remove all of the seals and reseal and entire truck camper.  After our experience, removing all of the seals and resealing the whole camper would take an individual several days.

We took Bill’s advice, and only fixed what was actually broken.

Cleaning the Existing Roof Seals

We started by unloading our camper so we could access, inspect, and seal every part of the camper, including the front wall and underside.  We also didn’t want to get any sealant on our truck.

Once demounted, Bill handed us gloves and a small container of acetone.  The acetone, as Bill explained, would clean the existing seals so we could see the condition of the seals and determine which seals needed repair.

Acetone is a colorless solvent commonly used to remove nail polish, and as a paint thinner.  The RV industry uses acetone extensively for cleaning and removing dirt and sealants before applying fresh sealants.

Cleaning Roof Seals Before Caulking

Gloves on, we climbed up the rear ladder of camper to inspect and clean the roof seals.  Angela wasn’t wild about the ladder, so she climbed up through the cabover roof escape hatch.  She much preferred getting on and off the roof through the escape hatch.

Close Up Cleaning Seals with acetone

The acetone made fairly quick work of cleaning the seals turning them from a dirty grey-white to a clean off-white.  The acetone seal cleaning also quickly revealed seal breaks and potential leaks.  Specifically, we were looking for cracks in the roof seals or any place where the sealant had come away from the roofing material.

Cleaning Around Vent On Roof

Here’s how Bill showed us to test roof sealant:

1. Pushed a blunt pencil end into the sealant.  Good sealant will be a little pliable and soft.  Bad sealant will be dry, hard, and brittle.  Bill showed us an old camper in his yard where the sealant was so dry you could break it off with your hands.  Fortunately, our sealant was still soft and pliable.

2. With your fingers, push on the sealant and check if there’s an air pocket underneath, or if it moves.  Good sealant will be tight to the camper with no air pockets and will not move.

TIP: Bill’s advice bears repeating; not that he’s a bear.  Do not remove good seals just to put new seals down.  Only caulk where the sealant is dry, cracked, or shows signs of wear and tear or deterioration.  If your seals are pliable and soft, attached firmly, and look good, leave them alone.

Finding and Repairing Broken Roof Seals

Crack In Seal On Roof

The edges of the bathroom skylight were an immediate point of concern.  The caulking around the skylight was damaged, especially on the edges.  The four corners of the skylight were literally popping out of the original self-leveling roof sealant.

Replacing Screws With Drill

To fix the seal around the skylight, we peeled back the original caulking in the trouble areas.  With the sealant removed, we could see that the corners of the vent were not screwed down when the camper was originally manufactured.

Screw Replaced Under Bad Caulk

We added four stainless steel screws, one for each corner, to prevent the skylight edges from popping out again.  Bill told us to put a dab of Sikaflex 715 on the screw holes before applying the stainless screws.  This helps to better seal the screw holes from possible leaks.

Rusty Screw Means Water Leak

The roof’s edges revealed more possible seal trouble spots.  The caulking in this area came off readily and the original screws were quite rusty.  We removed these rusty screws and replaced them with stainless steel screws.  Again, we put a dab of Sikaflex 715 on the screw holes first.

Some of the original eleven year-old caulking was in good shape.  It’s possible that the previous owner re-sealed the camper sometime over the camper’s first decade, but nothing we saw pointed in that direction.

Self Leveling Sealant On Roof

Beautiful Caulking Skylight Roof

Once the screws were applied, the old loose caulking was removed, and the area cleaned with acetone, we re-caulked the skylight with Sikaflex 715.

Bill Ward, Hallmark RV, Helps With Caulking

Above: Bill Ward helping with the caulking of the roof skylight

Black Items On Roof Crack First

Above: The black skylight in the bathroom and the black Fantastic Vent were the biggest problem areas on the roof

The biggest problem areas of our roof were around the black vents, perhaps because the black color absorbs more heat.

Another point of concern that Bill pointed out was around our roof rack and ladder.  The sealant around our roof rack and ladder was loose, and the screws in our roof rack were rusty.  Bill explained that water can get into the rack and ladder tubes and drip into your camper roof and walls.

Rusty Screws On The Roof Rack

Above: Notice the rusty screws on the roof rack

To address this problem, we carefully re-caulked where the roof and ladder and rack meet, and put dabs of Sikaflex on the screws.

TIP: Sikaflex 715 has a consistency similar to toothpaste.  Per Bill’s recommendation, we applied it evenly with a caulk gun, and then smoothed it out with our fingers.  It sounds messy, and it is, but it’s a straight forward material to work with.  Similar to the industry standard Dicor Lap Sealant, Sikaflex 715 is self-leveling.

Inspecting and Repairing Side Seals

Cleaning Side Seals Before Caulking

With the roof completed, we turned our focus to the seals on the side walls.  Once again, we used acetone to clean the seals.  This time, the seals went from a grey-black to an almost bright white.  The difference wasn’t subtle.

Acetone Takes Finish Off Metal

TIP: Bill warned us that acetone is great for cleaning seals, but it can also take the finish off anything metal, including RV window frames and compartment door surrounds.  To illustrate the point, he took us over to an old camper and rubbed the metal clean with acetone.  If at all possible, avoid rubbing acetone on anything metal.

Cleaning Up Camper Seals

It took both of us about a half-day to clean all of the seals.  No, we’re not slackers.  There are just a lot of seals on most truck campers; around windows, compartments, vents, and the perimeter seams.

Dirty And Clean Seals

Above: The right side of this seal has been cleaned white with acetone

Once the seals were clean, we visually inspected the seals on the sides, nose, rear, and underside of the camper.  Anywhere we spotted a problem we marked with a piece of tape.

Identifying Bad Sealant Spots Squawk Tape

This is a trick we learned from Northwood.  When Northwood quality controls a truck camper, the inspection team marks anything of concern with a small piece of red tape.  Northwood calls this “squawking” a camper, and calls the tape itself, “squawk”.

If we found a seal that appeared broken, or presented a gap, we squawked it with a small piece of tape.

Seals Just Peel Off Brittle And Old

Above: The refrigerator vent’s caulking peeled right off

This process helped us to not miss anything when we went back to repair the seals.  We also discovered that many of the areas of concern were near items that protruded from the camper, such as the refrigerator vent and exterior shower.  Anything with a lip on it often needed to be re-caulked.

TIP: Take extra special care with the seals around your clearance lights, especially the clearance lights on the front camper nose.  Front clearance lights are known throughout the industry as potential leak points and must be carefully monitored to prevent trouble.

Gordon Caulking Grab Handle Camper

To repair a broken or damaged seal, we first carefully removed the old sealant.  To do this, we would pry the sealant to get it started, and then pull the bad sealant right off.  To our surprise it came off very easily.

Pretty New Seal

Above: Sikaflex 521 has a consistency similar to toothpaste.  We applied it evenly with a caulk gun, and then smoothed it out with our fingers.

Once removed, we cleaned the area with acetone and then resealed the area with Sikaflex 521.  Again, the Sikaflex material is similar to toothpaste, and adheres well to the surface it’s applied to.  Finding and removing bad seals, and resealing those areas with Sikaflex 521, took the better part of a day.

Seal Tech Test at Parkview RV

SealTech machines are designed to pressurize the interior of your camper when all of the vents, fans, windows, and doors are shut.  Once pressurized, the camper exterior is sprayed with soapy water.  Wherever bubbles form is where there is a potential or existing leak on the truck camper.  Once identified, these leak sources can be sealed.

When we found out that Parkview RV in Smyrna, Delaware had a SealTech machine, we made an appointment for our freshly caulked and sealed camper.

Shroud Off Vent For Seal Test

If we had done our job right, we would find little to no seal breaks with the SealTech machine.  There was only one way to find out.

Seal Tech Machine Inside Camper

To begin the test, David Kemp set up the SealTech machine in the center of our camper, connected it to a top vent, made sure all vents and windows were closed, turned on the machine, and shut the rear door.

Seal Tech Test Looking For Bubbles Roof

Then David sprayed soapy water on the seals and known trouble points, starting with the roof.  To our delight, there wasn’t a single problem point on the roof; no bubbles.  Evidently we had done an excellent job and there were no cracks or breaks in the roof seals.

Window Seals Look Good

Above: Window seals looked good

When we went around the rear, sides, and front, our perfect record didn’t last.  There were a few problem areas, mostly around the rear tail lights, and a passenger’s side seam that needed to be resealed.

Bubbles Overcab Curve

Now comfortable with acetone, caulk guns, and Sikaflex sealant, we went to work fixing anywhere we saw bubbles.

After the SealTech test, and our subsequent seal repairs, we were confident that our camper had been properly and effectively sealed.

TIP: SealTech machines can sometimes push open a seal that isn’t very strong.  We found out later that the SealTech machine had likely blown out one of the seals around our front clearance lights, and needed to be resealed.

Now that we are comfortable with checking seals, caulking, and sealing, this process is now a routine event for us.  At least once a month we’re on the roof looking for cracks or other signs of trouble.  We have a caulk gun and tubes of Sikaflex 715 and 521 with us at all times.  We also regularly walk around our rig and inspect the seals.

It is really important to continuously look for signs of water intrusion.  It is something that should not be ignored and needs to be monitored on a consistent basis.

Please read Tips For Buying A Used Camper before you purchase a pre-owned unit.

 

Truck Camper Beast

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Sours: https://www.truckcampermagazine.com/maintenance/how-to-inspect-and-repair-camper-seals/
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We’re going to show you how we rebuilt the water damaged overhead cab the first time, and how we did it way better the second time. When we first bought our RV, one of the biggest jobs we had to do in the remodel was to fix the major water damage that was in the overhead cab. Not only is this common in Class Cs, but it can also be difficult to maintain. We went through the (tough) process of ripping it all out and rebuilding it, which lasted for almost two years with no problems until we dropped the ball on the very wet Oregon Coast while we were spending the winter there. We had been resealing the outside seams, but not enough and moisture inevitably found it’s way in. For that climate, we also should have been using a dehumidifier. Although, much props to how much the activated charcoal bags we keep around the rig and the mattress infused with charcoal saved so much.

Fortunately, this was a fairly easy do-it-yourself fix.

A lot of the reason that it would be so much easier than the first time was because we thankfully left everything loose in the first rebuild of the cab so that it wasn’t nearly as hard of a job as it was before to take everything out. We were so glad we did this! After thanking our past selves profusely, we got to work on the second rebuild, which we made much more resilient than the first one. Between using cedar planks rather than plywood (which is way more resistant to mold and water), using “KILZ” on every side of the material beneath it, and making the outside seals way stronger, we’re thinking this one will be pretty hard to destroy. Whether you’re dealing with water damage in an RV, a boat or in your home, we hope you find this helpful!

Sours: https://kreativefreedom.com/remodeling-our-class-c-rv-top-cab-from-water-damage-with-cedar-planks/
2007 Winnebago Class C Bunk Re Build

Class C Front Window Leak

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Rickb_cool

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Nov 7, 2003, 4:23:58 PM11/7/03

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Itasca Spirit 22E Class C - 2002

The rubber gasket on the inside top edge of the front overcab window
has a small slow dripping leak when it rains and the rig is parked.
Seems to me that water is running down the front slope, pooling and
penetrating into the cab. No leak while driving in the rain (yet).

Everything looks as if it is in perfect condition and brand new from
the outside and the inside. This is intended to work without any
sealant around the frame, but ... .

How do I correct and seal this kind leak.

Rick

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Frank Howell

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Nov 7, 2003, 5:11:28 PM11/7/03

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Rick

I would use caulking to seal the outside edge of the rubber seal
and I would also seal the inside edge of the outside rubber seal.
I would use 100% transparent silicon, in a caulking gun, with the tip of the
caulking tube cut at a 45° angle and just enough of the tip cut to produce a
1/8 inch bead.

Frank Howell
"Rickb_cool" <[email protected]> wrote in message
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Ron

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Nov 7, 2003, 6:24:05 PM11/7/03

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Personally, I would take the RV to a dealership that is used to taking out
that kind of window installation and have them remove and then replace the
leaking window.

Your unit is too new to start the non-professional do-it-yourself maybe not
to work solutions.


--
Ron
Port Dover Ontario


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Chris Bryant

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Nov 8, 2003, 1:28:58 AM11/8/03

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There are two seals on these windows- the glass to frame seal, and the
frame to body seal. Normally, it is the frame to body seal that leaks
(though not always).
The glass to frame seal is made on the underside of the the glass- the
rubber you see simply holds the glass in place and acts as trim- this can
be redone, but it is a bit of a PITA- you have to remove the glass, clean
the old sealant off, apply new (poly)urethane sealant, and reset the
glass. Unfortunately, if the original seal failed because of flexing,
likely the new seal will too, so you will probably have to pull the window
frame and reseal behind it as well.
The main problem is that most class "C"'s don't have much, if any
structure or framework across the front, so flexing is inevitable.

--
Chris Bryant
http://bryantrv.com

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Lon VanOstran

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Nov 8, 2003, 2:29:52 AM11/8/03

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In article <[email protected]>, "Ron" <[email protected]>
writes:

>Your unit is too new to start the non-professional do-it-yourself maybe not
>to work solutions.
>

Horse pucky. Anybody can pull a window, and the man who loves is it more apt to
do a good job than the average service tech who is hurrying to get to his next
coffee break.

I've had every window but the windshields and the driver's door crank-up out of
our MH.

Lon

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Lon VanOstran

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Nov 8, 2003, 2:29:53 AM11/8/03

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In article <[email protected]>, "Frank Howell"
<[email protected]> writes:

>Rick
>
>I would use caulking to seal the outside edge of the rubber seal
>and I would also seal the inside edge of the outside rubber seal.
>I would use 100% transparent silicon, in a caulking gun, with the tip of the
>caulking tube cut at a 45° angle and just enough of the tip cut to produce a
>1/8 inch bead.

I would pull the window, use a layer of butyl tape when reinstalling it, and
then caulk around it.

Lon

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HDinNY

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Nov 8, 2003, 2:57:34 AM11/8/03

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Lon VanOstran wrote:
snipped


> I've had every window but the windshields and the driver's door crank-up out of
> our MH.
>
> Lon

How was the sealant Lon? Was it Butyl tape to begin with? If
it was, was it still pliable or had it started to harden?
HD in NY

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Will Sill

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Nov 8, 2003, 5:35:18 AM11/8/03

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[email protected](Lon VanOstran) wrote this contribution to NG wisdom
concerning fixing a front window leak:

>I would pull the window, use a layer of butyl tape when reinstalling it, and
>then caulk around it.

And I would take a mightly close look at the clearance lights (which
many larger rigs have) to make sure the leak is under them rather than
around the window itself. OEM clearance lights are notorious for poor
installation and of course poor sealing.

Will Sill

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Lon VanOstran

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Nov 8, 2003, 2:26:07 PM11/8/03

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In article <[email protected]arthlink.net>, HDinNY
<[email protected]> writes:

>> I've had every window but the windshields and the driver's door crank-up
>out of
>> our MH.
>>
>> Lon
>
>How was the sealant Lon? Was it Butyl tape to begin with? If
>it was, was it still pliable or had it started to harden?
>HD in NY

It was still very pliable, but had begun to shrink and there were a few places
where it was very close to leaking. I was worried about 3 spots on 3 windows,
because it had become recessed at critical spots on top of the windows. I was
right about all 3 spots being close to leaking, but I got there first.

Maybe I am anal about it, but I have seen a lot of delamination on other
people's coaches, and I don't want any. In 4 years, I'll do it again, and
replace all of the screws when I do. The job is just too easy to let it turn
into delamination out of laziness.

Lon

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HDinNY

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Nov 8, 2003, 6:05:11 PM11/8/03

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Lon VanOstran wrote:

snipped


> It was still very pliable, but had begun to shrink and there were a few places
> where it was very close to leaking. I was worried about 3 spots on 3 windows,
> because it had become recessed at critical spots on top of the windows. I was
> right about all 3 spots being close to leaking, but I got there first.
>
> Maybe I am anal about it, but I have seen a lot of delamination on other
> people's coaches, and I don't want any. In 4 years, I'll do it again, and
> replace all of the screws when I do. The job is just too easy to let it turn
> into delamination out of laziness.
>
> Lon

Thanks Lon, good information. Have you given any thought to
the joint between the end caps and the fiberglass roof.
Aside from the windows which I believe we'll do next year,
that is the next place that looks like a good spot for leaks.
HD in NY

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Ron

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Nov 8, 2003, 7:12:25 PM11/8/03

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You must like voiding warrantees just to say you did it yourself from the
sounds of it.


--
Ron
Port Dover Ontario

"Lon VanOstran" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
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HDinNY

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Nov 8, 2003, 7:55:24 PM11/8/03

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Ron wrote:

> You must like voiding warrantees just to say you did it yourself from the
> sounds of it.

I don't think that's what he meant. I have to agree I'd
rather do it myself than let some "tech" do his thing. I've
seen what they do with a leaky window. I had one on our
Award that leaked. The manual said to pull the windows
annually and recaulk. The dealer's "tech" ran around the
outside with sealer. I saw that and pulled the window,
recaulked and it never leaked again.

Unless you can guarantee the tech is going to do the job
right, you might better either stand there and watch them do
it or do it yourself. I wonder how many people posting here
have had "minor" window leaks taken care of by a dealer. I'd
like to know how many windows were removed and recaulked
versus how many had sealer put around the outside. Might
make an enlightening new thread.
HD in NY

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Ron

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Nov 8, 2003, 9:04:17 PM11/8/03

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The repair would be like new from the factory or, he would be doing it again
as far as I am concerned. If I received a "half-assed job" under warranty
from a dealership there would be a lot of people hearing about it including
but not limited to the manufacturer.

If out of warranty, there are a lot of things on the RV that I would do but,
under warranty, that is a different story.


--
Ron
Port Dover Ontario

"HDinNY" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]

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Lon VanOstran

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Nov 8, 2003, 11:03:49 PM11/8/03

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In article <[email protected]>, "Ron" <[email protected]>
writes:

>You must like voiding warrantees just to say you did it yourself from the
>sounds of it.

Since most RVs come with a 12 month warranty, what warranty would I be voiding?
Where, in which warranty, does it say that maintainance must be performed by a
licensed professional?

Frankly, when I get a new car, if it needs tweeking to make it perfect, and if
there are no expensive parts involved, I do the work myself because I want it
done right.
When we got our MH, I had a list of a dozen or more fit and finish things that
I corrected myself because I wanted it done right.

I have never had any warranty voided because I have done my own mainainance.
If I ever do, we will find out in court if they can legally do that. (I already
know they can't)

Oh, and if you are talking about extended warranties, I'm not in the habit of
unnecessarily enriching sales droids by wasting money on such things.

Lon

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Lon VanOstran

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Nov 8, 2003, 11:04:00 PM11/8/03

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In article <[email protected]>, HDinNY
<[email protected]> writes:

>Thanks Lon, good information. Have you given any thought to
>the joint between the end caps and the fiberglass roof.
>Aside from the windows which I believe we'll do next year,
>that is the next place that looks like a good spot for leaks.
>HD in NY

No thought at all, but I _have_ given it new caulk. I have removed about 80% of
the caulk on our MH, and replaced it. As soon as I get my arm back, I'll do the
rest. If you replace it early, it is nice and pliable, and pulls off in nice
long strings. If you wait until it is dry and brittle, I don't know how you
would get it off. Now, it comes away so clean that a little 3 M adhesive
remover cleans the residue off easily.

Since you mention the fiberglass roof, our first symptom of aging caulk was
along the sides, where the roof tucks under the drip edge. It was cracking in
places, so I removed that last fall and replaced it. Since then, I have been
pecking away at the rest of the MH, as ambition has struck.

Caulk and butyl tape are cheap, and my time is free. We love our MH, and what
could be more fun than fondling something/one that you love? <g>

Lon

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HDinNY

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Nov 9, 2003, 12:22:50 AM11/9/03

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Dapper Dave wrote:
snipped
> You were supposed to remove all the windows every year??!! Good lord.

Yeah, wouldn't that be a gas? I didn't follow that "plan", I
just did the caulking around the perimeter for the rest of
the windows. I did check the condition of the butyl though
and made sure it was still pliable.

On our HR Alumascape, the side wall is smooth aluminum and
shouldn't be as prone to leakage as say the corrugated stuff
used on some trailers. Plus I was glad it was aluminum
instead of fiberglass just because of how the panels are
made. Gluing a sheet on luan plywood isn't the best way to
build a wall. Delamination seems to be fairly common on
older units.

We almost bought an early Award trailer we found in Rome,
New York. It was the only Award I have ever seen with a
smooth aluminum side wall skin. IIRC, this one was an '86
model the guy was trying to sell as an '87. He had never
covered it and the interior showed no sign of leakage. This
was around '93 so it had seen some winters already. It
actually was nicer than the one we eventually bought.
HD in NY

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Lon VanOstran

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Nov 9, 2003, 4:54:59 AM11/9/03

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In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] writes:

>Tell me about wasted money, Lon,if calamity befalls and you have to
>replace the Cummins, which happened to my BIL. Without the extended
>warranty he purchased, he would have been out over $20K.
>
>Canoli

Even people who make stupid bets win from time to time. That doesn't make the
bet any smarter. I suspect that your BIL also buys lottery tickets.

Lon

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Rickb_cool

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Nov 9, 2003, 5:51:38 PM11/9/03

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Thanks to all who have responded.

I have thought about the possibility that it is the light over the
window that are leaking and decided to test that by taking a hose and
flooding the top of the window for a relatively long time or until the
window leaks. I will also test each light seperately by the same
technique, once the window is no longer leaking (if it leaked).

I had not thought of removing the window as I could not see how that
would be done and have not previously seen a window remoced or
installed. This sound like a good option which I will consider. Anyone
willing to comment on how this is done and where the butyl sealants
are available?

I also wrote Winnebago and here is their response this may give some
insight as to why dealers/service centers do what they do):


Richard,

Cap sealing the perimeter of the frame with clear silicone is the
suggested
method.

Service Administration
Winnebago Industries, Inc.
[email protected]

****************************************************************************
Name: Richard Boehme
Street: 54 Miller Hill Woods Court
City: Carmel
State: NY
Zip: 10512
Country: USA
Phone: 845-225-5264
E_MAIL: [email protected]
RV Owner Yes: Yes
Brand: Itasca Spirit 22E
RV Owner No:
Plan to Purchase:
Submit: Submit Form

Comments:

Please help,

The from window in the cab-overhead has a small drip along the rubber
gasket
at the top side of the window. I expect that when parked water is
flowing
down the front slop onto the gasket and is penetrating into the coach.

Please inform me how I may fix this leak. If it ois simple enough I
would
prefer doing it myself as going to a service center for warranty work
will
take some time.

Thankyou

Rick Boehme

[email protected] (Rickb_cool) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

Sours: https://groups.google.com/

Seal cab c class rv

We're sorry.

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RV Roof Replacement! No More Roof Leaks!

It, and quickly jerk it. Goose bumps ran over my skin, I pulled myself up strongly, and a hot stream splashed right into her mouth. After this act we had 2 more. Then we talked about it for half a night. She left in the morning.

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