Index match multiple criteria

Index match multiple criteria DEFAULT

INDEX and MATCH with multiple criteria

This is a more advanced formula. For basics, see How to use INDEX and MATCH.

Normally, an INDEX MATCH formula is configured with MATCH set to look through a one-column range and provide a match based on given criteria. Without concatenating values in a helper column, or in the formula itself, there's no way to supply more than one criteria.

This formula works around this limitation by using boolean logic to create an array of ones and zeros to represent rows matching all 3 criteria, then using MATCH to match the first 1 found. The temporary array of ones and zeros is generated with this snippet:

(H5=B5:B11)*(H6=C5:C11)*(H7=D5:D11)

Here we compare the item in H5 against all items, the size in H6 against all sizes, and the color in H7 against all colors. The initial result is three arrays of TRUE/FALSE results like this:

{TRUE;TRUE;TRUE;FALSE;FALSE;FALSE;TRUE}*{FALSE;FALSE;TRUE;FALSE;FALSE;TRUE;FALSE}*{TRUE;FALSE;TRUE;FALSE;FALSE;FALSE;TRUE}

Tip: use F9 to see these results. Just select an expression in the formula bar, and press F9.

The math operation (multiplication) transforms the TRUE FALSE values to 1s and 0s:

{1;1;1;0;0;0;1}*{0;0;1;0;0;1;0}*{1;0;1;0;0;0;1}

After multiplication, we have a single array like this:

which is fed into the MATCH function as the lookup array, with a lookup value of 1:

At this point, the formula is a standard INDEX MATCH formula. The MATCH function returns 3 to INDEX:

and INDEX returns a final result of $

Array visualization

The arrays explained above can be difficult to visualize. The image below shows the basic idea. Columns B, C, and D correspond to the data in the example. Column F is created by the multiplying the three columns together. It is the array handed off to MATCH.

INDEX and MATCH with multiple criteria - array visualization

Non-array version

It is possible to add another INDEX to this formula, avoiding the need to enter as an array formula with control + shift + enter:

The INDEX function can handle arrays natively, so the second INDEX is added only to "catch" the array created with the boolean logic operation and return the same array again to MATCH. To do this, INDEX is configured with zero rows and one column. The zero row trick causes INDEX to return column 1 from the array (which is already one column anyway).

Why would you want the non-array version? Sometimes, people forget to enter an array formula with control + shift + enter, and the formula returns an incorrect result. So, a non-array formula is more "bulletproof". However, the tradeoff is a more complex formula.

Note: In Excel , it is not necessary to enter array formulas in a special way.

Sours: https://exceljet.net/formula/index-and-match-with-multiple-criteria

INDEX MATCH with multiple criteria

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So, you're an expert, using it to replace entirely. But there are still a few lookups that you're not sure how to perform. Most importantly, you'd like to be able to look up a value based on multiple criteria within separate columns.

Fortunately, there is a solution. We can combine with a new tool called "array formulas" to look up a value based on multiple criteria. Here's how.

Familiarity with is a pre-requisite for this tutorial. If you're not yet comfortable with it, check out our INDEX MATCH tutorial to get up to speed. And if you're just getting started with Excel, start with our how-to on the top Excel features to learn.

Defining the problem

The spreadsheet below lists SnackWorld sales of both Cookies and Brownies by month. The spreadsheet is in what we call flat-file format, meaning that each separate combination of item category-month is on its own row.

SnackWorld sales of cookies and crackers

We want to be able to look up the number of units sold based on a particular combination of item-month — for example, the number of Cookies sold in February.

MATCH with multiple criteria

To solve this problem, we'll have to figure out a way to use the function to match against multiple criteria columns. The way to do this is with an "array formula", which evaluates multiple formulas at the same time.

With , the easiest way to create an array formula is by using the symbol, like so:

=(&, &, )

It's very important to note that when you use an array formula like this one, you'll need to commit your formula using ++ rather than just pressing . This will tell Excel that you're using an array formula rather than a standard formula. To show you that it's recognized an array formula, Excel will put a set of curly braces () around your entry.

Let's take a look at an example, in which we match against two separate columns: and :

MATCH example with multiple inputs{=(&,&, )}
Output:

In this formula, we've used the symbol to tell to look up two criteria rather than one. Excel returns the value , because on the fourth row down it sees a match that satisfies both of the criteria we've provided: Column B contains the word and Column C contains the word .

Note that the order of our criteria here is important. Since our argument is the first one, it's looked up within the first range provided — . Likewise, since our argument comes second, it is matched in the range .

If you're getting an error when you enter the formula, make sure you've commited with ++ and see those curly braces in the formula bar. Excel will give you an error if you haven't explicitly told it that you're entering an array formula.

Putting it all together

Now that we know how to use with multiple criteria, it's pretty easy to bring into the equation. Our final formula will look something like this:

{=(, (&&, &&, ))}

First, let's use this function to find out which month we sold 76 million units worth of Brownies:

INDEX MATCH example with multiple criteria{=(, (&, &, ))}
Output:

Next, let's create some dynamic input cells that let us input a month and item, then write a formula that tells Excel to pull the number of units sold for that given combination. Our formula will reference these dynamic cells with the arguments:

A second INDEX MATCH example with dynamic inputs{=(, (&, &, ))}
Month input: ()
Item input: ()
Output:

There we have it — with multiple criteria! Note that you're not just restricted to only two criteria here, as we've done in our examples. You can add as many additional criteria as you'd like using the symbol multiple times. Just note that performance may slow down if you chain too many of these at once in a large spreadsheet.

Save an hour of work a day with these 5 advanced Excel tricks

Work smarter, not harder. Sign up for our 5-day mini-course to receive must-learn lessons on getting Excel to do your work for you.

  • How to create beautiful table formatting instantly
  • Why to rethink the way you do VLOOKUPs
  • Plus, we'll reveal why you shouldn't use PivotTables and what to use instead

Comments

Save an hour of work a day with these 5 Excel tricks

Work smarter, not harder. Sign up for our 5-day mini-course to receive must-learn lessons on getting Excel to do your work for you.

Sours: https://www.deskbright.com/excel/index-match-multiple-criteria/
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Excel INDEX MATCH with multiple criteria - formula examples

comments to "Excel INDEX MATCH with multiple criteria - formula examples"

      • Stupid web codes

        [email protected](HN35,IF(B12 &#; ,1,IF(AND(B12 &#; =,B12 &#; ),2,IF(AND(B12 &#; =,B12 &#; =4),3,IF(AND(B12 &#; =,B12 &#; ),4,IF(AND(B12 &#; =,B12 &#; ),5,IF(AND(B12 &#; =,B12 &#; ),6,IF(AND(B12 &#; =,B12 &#; ),7,IF(AND(B12 &#; =,B12 &#; ),8,IF(AND(B12 &#; =,B12 &#; ),9,IF(AND(B12 &#; =,B12 &#; ),10,IF(AND(B12 &#; =,B12 &#; ),11,0))))))))))),IF(B7 &#; ,1,IF(AND(B7 &#; =,B7 &#; ),2,IF(AND(B7 &#; =,B7 &#; ),3,IF(AND(B7 &#; =,B7 &#; ),4,IF(AND(B7 &#; =,B7 &#; ),5,IF(AND(B7 &#; =,B7 &#; ),6,IF(AND(B7 &#; =,B7 &#; ),7))))))))

                    • I wonder if it's possible to use the criteria from one sheet to search for information on a second chart.
                      I want to see if the annual salary for each job title falls in the min, mid, or max range for each job level.
                      Every I try gets errors.
                      Chart 1
                      JOB TITLE JOB LEVEL ANNUAL SALARY MARKET-RATIO
                      Analytics Developer Junior $60,
                      Analytics Developer Lead $95,
                      Automation Tester Senior $95,
                      Business Analyst Intermediate $95,
                      Content Writer Senior $64,
                      Visual Designer Senior $,
                      Visual Designer Senior $95,

                      Chart 2
                      Job Title Level Min Mid Max
                      Analytics Developer Junior 60, 75, 90,
                      Intermediate 70, 87, ,
                      Senior 82, , ,
                      Automation Tester Junior 56, 70, 84,
                      Intermediate 70, 87, ,
                      Senior 79, 99, ,
                      Business Analyst Junior 56, 70, 84,
                      Intermediate 68, 85, ,
                      Senior 85, , ,
                      Content Writer Junior 54, 68, 82,
                      Intermediate 64, 80, 96,
                      Senior 80, , ,
                      Visual Designer Junior 56, 70, 84,
                      Intermediate 68, 85, ,
                      Senior 85, , ,

                            Sours: https://www.ablebits.com/office-addins-blog//12/11/excel-index-match-multiple-criteria-formula-examples/
                            Advanced Excel Index Match (3 Most Effective Formulas for Multiple Criteria)

                            While working in Excel, we often have to sort out some data matching single or multiple criteria from a data set. You can do this quite comfortably using Excel’s INDEX and MATCH function. You can do it using both Array Formula and Non-Array Formula

                            Today I am going to show how you can sort out some data matching multiple criteria in Excel using Non-Array Formula


                            Download File



                            INDEX MATCH Multiple Criteria in Excel (Without Array Formula)


                            Let us look at this data set. We have the scorecard of students of the annual examination of a school called Saint Joseph School.

                            We have the Names of the Students in column B, their Marks in Mathematics in column C, their Marks in Physics in column D and their Marks in Chemistry in column E respectively.

                            A Data set in Excel

                            Now if anyone asks you the name of the student who achieved in all three subjects, then what will you do? Quite simple. I am showing you how you can sort that out.


                            Introduction to Excel’s INDEX() and MATCH() Function


                            Before going to the main point, I just want to give you an idea about Excel’s INDEX() and MATCH() Function. 


                            1. INDEX() Function

                            Let us look at the data set again. Assume that someone asked you how much the 11th student obtained in Physics? How will you find that?

                            If you do not have any idea about the INDEX() Function, you will probably count 1… 2… in the Student Name column, starting from Mitchel Robbins, up to

                            Then you will see what the mark of that student in number 11 in Physics is.

                            In this case, it is Alisha Moor. She achieved 34 in Physics.

                            But you can find this out quite comfortably using Excel’s INDEX() Function.

                            INDEX() Function takes three arguments.

                            1. A range of cells from which you want to sort out the datum. In our case it is B4:E23. From the name of the first student, Mitchel Robbins to the number obtained in Chemistry by the last student Emily Bronte,
                            2. The number of the row of the datum which you want to find out, within the range of cells.. As here we want to know about the 11th student, the row number here is
                            3. Also the number of the column of the datum which you want to find out, within the range of cells. As here we want to know about the marks in Physics, the column number here is 3.

                            So, the syntax for the INDEX() Function is:

                            =INDEX(range,row_number,column_number)

                            And in this case, the formula will be:

                            If you select any cell and insert this formula there, you will get the datum of row number 11 and column number 3, from the range of cells B4:E

                            In our case, it is 34 points achieved by the 11th student, Alisha Moor.

                            INDEX() Function in Excel

                            Points to Keep in Mind

                            • If you have only one row in the range, inserting row number is optional. Excel will automatically take it as 1.
                            • Again If you have only one column in the range, inserting column number is optional. Excel will automatically take it as 1.
                            • If you enter any row number or column number that falls out of the range, Excel will raise Reference Error (#REF!)
                            • Also If you enter 0 in place of row number, Excel will return the whole column as output. But that will work like an Array Formula then.
                            • So you have to select multiple (the required number of) cells and press Ctrl + Shift + Enter.
                            • And If you enter 0 in place of column number, Excel will return the whole row as output. But that will work like an Array Formula too.
                            • So you have to select multiple (the required number of) cells and press Ctrl + Shift + Enter.

                            This is the Array Form of the INDEX() function. Besides this, there is another form of the  INDEX() function, called Reference Form. That is not necessary here.

                            But if you want to know more about these, visit this link.


                            2. MATCH() Function

                            The syntax of the MATCH() Function is:

                            =MATCH(lookup_value, lookup_array, match_type)

                            The MATCH() Function takes 3 arguments.

                            1. A specific text or number.
                            2. A range of cells.
                            3. Match type (-1, 0, 1). 0 for an exact match.

                            Then it returns the position of the cell within the range which is matched with the specific text or number.

                            Going back to our dataset, if we select any cell and enter the formula

                            =MATCH(“Alisha Moor”,BB20,0)

                            It will return 5. Because Alisha Moor is in the 5th position in the range from B10 to B20.

                            MATCH() Function in Excel

                            Points to Keep in Mind:

                            • If MATCH() function does not get any match, it returns Value not Available (#N/A!) error.
                            • MATCH() function does not distinguish between uppercase and lowercase letters.

                            If you want to know more about the MATCH() function, visit this link. 


                            INDEX and MATCH Multiple Criteria Without Array Formula


                            Now we go back to our main point. How to sort out the student obtaining in all the three subjects.

                            There are 3 criteria here. 

                            • in Mathematics, that is column B.
                            • Also in Physics, that is column C.
                            • And in Chemistry, that is column D.

                            Let’s try for one criterion first. Sort out the student with marks only in Mathematics.

                            First, we get the position of the cell in column C, which contains , in the range C4 to C23. We shall use the MATCH() function here.

                            The formula will be:

                            And you will get Because in the 14th cell of column C, there is a

                            MATCH Function in Excel

                            Now use this value to find out the name of the student. It is pretty straightforward. Use the INDEX() function to sort out the 14th value in the Student Name column, in the range B4 to B23.

                            So the formula will be

                            And you will get Ricky Ben.

                            INDEX Function in Excel

                            So the total formula will be

                            =INDEX(B4:B23,MATCH(,C4:C23,0),1)

                            =INDEX(B4:B23,MATCH(,C4:C23,0),1)

                            Use this and you will get the same result, Ricky Ben.

                            INDEX() and MATCH() Together in Excel

                            Now we sorted out the datum with one criterion. But how can we do this for multiple criteria, without using Array Formula? Here I am showing two ways.


                            Method 1: Using the CONCATENATE() Function

                            This is the easier one. First merge the columns to which your criteria belong,  into a new column.

                            Here the three criteria are in Mathematics, in Physics, and in Chemistry. They belong to columns C, D, and E respectively. So we merge them into a new column F

                            To merge them, you can either use this formula in the first cell of column F, F4

                            =CONCATENATE(C4,”,”,D4,”,”,E4)

                            And then drag the Fill Handle

                            Or you can directly merge them into F4 by using the Ampersand Symbol (&):

                            =C4&”,”&D4″,”&E4

                            And then drag the Fill Handle.

                            In both cases, you will find the numbers of three subjects of each student merged in one column F like this. 

                            CONCATENATE() Function in Excel

                            Then consider this as a single criterion and use the INDEX and MATCH formula for single criterion, shown earlier.

                            In this case, the formula will be

                            =INDEX(B4:B23,MATCH(“,,”,F4:F23,0))

                            And you will get Ricky Ben. Because he is the one with in all three subjects.

                            INDEX and MATCH Together in Excel

                            Special Note: Within the MATCH() Function, in the first argument (lookup_value), I covered that between Apostrophes(“”).

                            Though they were numbers before being merged, after being merged they were converted to texts. That’s why I had to use Apostrophes(“”).


                            Method 2. Using INDEX() Within INDEX() Function

                            This is a bit complex. I am showing you step by step so that you can understand.

                            Let’s compare with each mark in Mathematics. With this formula

                            It will return an array of Boolean values, TRUE or FALSE. TRUE if any mark is equal to , and FALSE otherwise. 

                            Then do the same for marks in Physics and Chemistry.

                            Then we multiply the three arrays. 

                            =(C4:C23=)*(D4:D23=)*(E4:E23=)

                            Though they were of Boolean values, after multiplication, they will turn into numbers, 1 and 0. 

                            As anything multiplied by 0 is 0, therefore after multiplication, the resultant array will contain 1 only if there were 1 in all the cells of the row, before multiplication.

                            In short words, in the resultant array, only the position where marks in all 3 subjects are , will have a 1. All others will have 0.

                            Then we enter this resultant array within an INDEX() function as range, while keep row number is 0, and column number to 1.

                            =INDEX((C4:C23=)*(D4:D23=)*(E4:E23=),0,1)

                            As the row number is 0, the INDEX() function will return the column with number 1, that means the resultant array which we used as the range.

                            Now we enter this into a MATCH() function and find out if there is any 1 within it. If there is, then where?

                            =MATCH(1,INDEX((C4:C23=)*(D4:D23=)*(E4:E23=),0,1),0)

                            Finally, we enter it within another INDEX() function as the row number, with the Name of the Students as its range and the column number as 1.

                            It will return the Name of the Student in that position.

                            And we will get the student with in all three subjects. In our case, that is Ricky Ben.

                            So the complete formula will be

                            INDEX(B4:B23,MATCH(1,INDEX((C4:C23=)*(D4:D23=)*(E4:E23=),0,1),0),1)

                            Non Array Formula with INDEX MATCH in Excel

                            So, we can sort out any datum from any data set using this formula, maintaining multiple criteria.

                            The best thing is that it is a Non – Array Formula. That means you do not need to press Ctrl + Shift + Enter to enter this formula. Only pressing Enter will do. 


                            Comparison with Array Formula

                            There is a comparatively shorter formula to do this. That is

                            =INDEX(B4:B23,MATCH(1,C4:C23=*D4:D23=*E4:E23=,0),1)

                            But this is an Array Formula. After writing this into the Formula Bar, you have to press Ctrl + Shift + Enter to enter this.

                            Excel will automatically put curly braces ({}) around this in the Formula Bar, as a sign of Array Formula.

                            Array Formula with INDEX MATCH in Excel


                            Conclusion

                            Using these methods, you can find out any datum matching multiple criteria from any data set. This is pretty convenient. Do you know any other method? Let us know in the comment section.

                            Sours: https://www.exceldemy.com/index-match-multiple-criteria-without-array/

                            Multiple criteria match index

                            Usually, having sex quickly and violently, we then lay for a long time caressing each other, talking and gaining strength for a new. Attempt. This is how it happened one evening, when suddenly Sasha asked me, tell me who you met before me. We had not discussed this topic before, and I looked at him a little surprised and hesitated, not knowing what to say.

                            Excel Magic Trick 606: INDEX \u0026 MATCH Two Lookup Values

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