13 west 13th street nyc

13 west 13th street nyc DEFAULT

In Support of Landmark Designation of 50 West 13th Street

March 22, 2021

Commissioner Sarah Carroll, Chair
NYC Landmarks Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007
Re: In support of landmark designation of 50 West 13th St.

Dear Chairwoman Carroll,

On behalf of the Preservation League of New York State, I write in support of the evaluation of 50 West 13th St. as an individual landmark. This site contains significant history deserving of protection under the rule of the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

With the passing of owner Edith O’Hara, of the 13th Street Repertory Company which occupies the building, we are concerned for the future of the building and its rich cultural history. Built in Greek revival style c. 1846-47, it retains its original form and many architectural details such as the ogee arches at the window lintels, a bracketed metal cornice at the roof, parlor floor windows, and cast-iron portico with a hipped metal hood. Local lure also points to a hidden passageway in the building rumored to be connected to the underground railroad. While other theories may indicate use as a speakeasy.

Recently, it was discovered this building had a strong link to African American history. Between 1858-84, Jacob Day was one of New York’s most prominent African American businessman and Abolitionist. During his time residing at the property were historic times spanning the Underground Railroad, the Civil War, Draft Riots, Emancipation and the adoption of Amendments 13, 14, 15, and Reconstruction efforts, which Mr. Day was active in.

When the building was altered to include a theater in 1958, the so-called “off-off Broadway” theater took on important social & cultural history. Under Edith’s direction, it championed upand-coming artists, including Bette Midler, Barry Manilow, Chazz Palminteri, Amy Stiller, Jamie DeRoy, Richard Dreyfus, and Christopher Meloni.

The history that resides within the walls of this building is something we believe should be further explored and retained for future generations. From the architecture to the history of Mr. Day as a prominent African American resident, to potential Underground Railroad connections, as well as the cultural significance of the off-off Broadway decades- 50 West 13th St. runs the gamut of historic importance we seek to celebrate.

Please feel free to contact me with any questions you might have.

Sincerely,

Jay DiLorenzo
President

Sours: https://www.preservenys.org/advocacy-updates/in-support-of-landmark-designation-of-50-west-13th-street

Residential dealmakers storm city’s investment sales market

Clockwise from left: 79 Clifton Place, 80-01 37th Avenue, 45 East Mosholu Parkway North (LoopNet, Google Maps)

Clockwise from left: 79 Clifton Place, 80-01 37th Avenue, 45 East Mosholu Parkway North (LoopNet, Google Maps)

Rising rents appear to have investors bullish on the ongoing recovery of the city’s residential market, with a majority of middle-market deals last week targeting residential and mixed-use properties.

Other markers of how the pandemic has refocused the city’s property market included an industrial purchase by warehouse giant Prologis, an Amazon-leased parking lot bought by Wildflower and another discounted hotel sale by middle-market lodging king Sam Chang.

Six deals closed in Manhattan, three in Brooklyn, three in Queens and two in the Bronx. In total, the 14 transactions fetched $245 million, well ahead of last week’s $173 million.

Below are more details on investment deals in the $10 million to $30 million range recorded during the second week of October.

1. The Carlyle Group bought a 40-unit apartment building at 79 Clifton Place in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, for $34 million. European investment firm Freo Group, which sold the 58,000 square-foot building, had bought it for $22.9 million in January 2020. The former knitting factory was built in 1939 and converted into loft apartments in 2001.

2.A&E Real Estate bought a 99-unit, mixed-use building at 80-01 37th Avenue in Jackson Heights, Queens, for $26.3 million. The 98,500 square-foot building, one of two recently acquired by A&E, has 87 residential units. The Joseph Bruno Trust, which managed the property since its development almost a century ago, sold the building.

3.Rettner Realty sold a portfolio of mixed-use buildings totaling 125 residential units at 45 East Mosholu Parkway North in Norwood and 741 East 217th Street in Olinville — both in the Bronx — and 501 West 147 Street in Hamilton Heights for a combined $24.5 million. The buyer of the 116,000 square-foot portfolio was an anonymous, family-owned limited liability company. Rosewood Realty brokered the sale.

4. Prolific hotel developer Sam Chang sold a nine-story hotel building at 548 West 48th Street  in Hell’s Kitchen for $22.7 million. Hengjiang Mu of All States Capital Group signed the sales deed for the buyer. Chang purchased the 28,500-square-foot hotel, which operates as a Comfort Inn, in 2018 for $29 million.

5. Land Finance Corporation, an affiliate of gun manufacturer Beretta USA, bought a 5,000 square-foot retail building at 991 Third Avenue in Lenox Hill for $19.8 million. The Heskel Group sold the building, which it had bought in 2012 for $18.4 million. The Beretta affiliate recently bought 28 Howard Street for $21.8 million, and sold 407 Park Avenue in May for $31 million.

6. Warehouse giant Prologis bought a 66,800 square-foot industrial building at 1124 Close Avenue in Soundview, Bronx, for $18.4 million. Seller Watclo Realty had owned the building since 1982.

7. North River Investment Company picked up 19,200 square feet of mixed-use space at 34 and 36 East 4th Street in Noho for $16.5 million. The buildings have a combined 34 residential units. Brooklyn-based Granite International Management was the seller, via East Fourth Corp., which had owned the buildings since 1995.

8. A Wildflower-affiliated limited liability company bought a 58,000 square-foot parking lot at 125 Shepherd Avenue and 12505 Flatlands Avenue as well as an adjacent parcel in New Lots, Brooklyn, for $14.5 million. Alan Soiefer’s Selar Realty was the seller. Amazon has agreed to lease the lots, a Wildflower representative said. The company owns an additional 236,000 square feet of industrial and parking space along Flatlands Avenue.

9. Prana Investments bought 98 residential units at 192 and 200 Nagle Avenue in Inwood for $13 million. Morris Lieberman sold the 87,000 square-foot buildings. Rosewood Realty brokered the deal.

10. A Bushwack Capital affiliate bought a 42,200 square-foot parcel at 25 Stewart Avenue in East Williamsburg, Brooklyn, for $12.2 million. Seller J Stewart Realty LLC purchased the vacant land from Yoel Goldman last year for $3 million. Bushwick Capital’s Dawson Stellberger recently bought an interest in 154 Scott Avenue, a manufacturing building in East Williamsburg.

11. Branko Mustac bought a 45-unit multifamily building at 30-47 29th Street in Astoria for $11.2 million. Three limited liability companies sold the 34,500 square-foot square-foot building.

12. Thor Equities sold two commercial condo units spanning 11,200 square feet at 24 West 40th Street for $10.8 million. Chinese textile company Loftex bought units, which will become a showroom for furnishings it supplies to home goods stores such as Ikea, Kohls and Walmart. Thor had initially asked $14.5 million for the condos.

13. Rockledge Properties bought three rent-controlled buildings with 72 total units at 90-16 171st Street and 90-75 179th Street in Jamaica, plus 106-15 217th Street in Queens Village, for $10.6 million. Noah Freedman was the seller.

14. Davean Holdings bought a 9,600 square-foot, mixed-use building at 164 First Avenue in the East Village for $10.4 million. Louise Pfister signed for the seller, Casabel LLC. Davean recently bought two similar buildings spanning 14,700 square feet in the Financial District for $10.1 million. Those buildings house two ground-floor bars and seven apartments.


Sours: https://therealdeal.com/2021/10/21/residential-dealmakers-storm-citys-investment-sales-market/
  1. Bike rack for 2013 rav4
  2. Driving directions to gadsden alabama
  3. Weather forecast st clair michigan

13 West 13th Street, 3CS

Norville House, Greenwich Village, Manhattan, NY 10011

WEB ID: 20652751

sold

2 BEDS | 1 BATH | Co-op

5 AVENUE and AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS

$930,000
    • Maintenance/Common Charges: $2,387
    • 25% Down: $232,500
  • 2 BEDS

  • 1 BATHS

  • POST-WAR

  • S EXPOSURE

  • BUILT 1962

The Details
About 13 West 13Th Street, 3CS, Greenwich Village, Manhattan, NY 10011

This sprawling South-facing convertible-two-bedroom gem is located on a prime tree-lined block in the heart of Greenwich Village, just off Fifth Avenue. The enormous rooms and flexible layout make this apartment stand out from others currently on the market. Now configured as two-bedroom layout, the apartment was originally built as an enormous one bedroom with an alcove for dining or an all-im...

Listing Courtesy of Corcoran

  • Doorman
  • Elevator
  • Enormous Rooms
  • Galley kitchen
  • Good light
  • Great closet space
  • Hardwood floors
  • Part-time Doorman

Greenwich Village

NYC’s village neighborhoods, collectively, stretch across Manhattan from Houston Street on the south to 14th Street on the north. The borders of central Greenwich Village are roughly Third and Sixth avenues (larger Greenwich Village includes the West Village, but the West Village has its own neighborhood vibe and is described separately). Today, a mix of residents are drawn by its lively energy and commercial activity around Union Square and on Broadway and Sixth Avenue. New York University, housed in a number of buildings around Washington Square, adds to the character of the area. Washington Square, the heart of the neighborhood, is one of New York’s iconic destinations. Visit on a warm spring day, with street musicians performing and political activists gathering under the arch dedicated to George Washington, and it becomes clear that much of Greenwich Village’s traditional character remains.

about the building

13 West 13Th Street

Apartment Building in Greenwich Village

5 AVENUE and AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS

82 UNITS

6 STORIES

1962 BUILT

Learn more about Norville House

Sales History

Sales History for NORVILLE HOUSE

09/23/20217-AS$712,500011
07/20/20213ABN$1,350,000021
07/12/20213-JS$1,050,000021

Sales History for 13 West 13th Street, 3CS

10/18/2021$930,000Sold
01/14/2011$715,000Sold

All information furnished regarding property for sale, rental or financing is from sources deemed reliable, but no warranty or representation is made as to the accuracy thereof and same is submitted subject to errors, omissions, change of price, rental or other conditions, prior sale, lease or financing or withdrawal without notice. All dimensions are approximate. For exact dimensions, you must hire your own architect or engineer. Images may be digitally enhanced photos, virtually staged photos, artists' renderings of future conditions, or otherwise modified, and therefore may not necessarily reflect actual site conditions. Accordingly, interested parties must confirm actual site conditions for themselves, in person.

Sours: https://www.corcoran.com/homes-for-sale/13-west-13-th-street-3cs-manhattan-ny-10011/20652751/regionId=1
13 West 13th Street #3DS New York, NY 10011

227 West 13th Street

Skip to content
Meridian Retail Leasing
227 W 13th Street Flyer

Located Between Seventh and Greenwich Avenues
West Village

Prime West Village Retail Space

Monthly Rent$19,000
Ground Floor2,300 SF
Basement2,500 SF
  • Prime West Village Retail Space
  • High Ceilings and Skylight in the Space
  • Steps from Jackson Square

Download setup

We use cookies to offer you a better browsing experience, analyze site traffic, personalize content, and serve targeted advertisements. Read about how we use cookies and how you can control them by checking our Privacy Policy. If you continue to use this site, you consent to our use of cookies. Privacy Policy page ACCEPTReject

Privacy & Cookies Policy

Sours: https://www.meridiancapital.com/retail-leasings/227-west-13th-street/

Street 13th nyc west 13

Rescuing an Off Off Broadway Theater With a Storied Past

streetscapes

Preservationists hope to save the 13th Street Repertory Company building, with a little help from the Underground Railroad.

When Edith O’Hara, the mother hen and indefatigable leader of the eclectic 13th Street Repertory Company for nearly half a century, died last fall at age 103, the future became decidedly shaky for one of Off Off Broadway’s longest-operating stages.

In an effort to ensure that it’s not the end of the run as well for the antebellum brick house where both the theater and Ms. O’Hara made their homes, preservationists are urging the city to grant landmark protection to the three-story Greek Revival structure.

The city Landmarks Preservation Commission told an advocacy group in January that the quaint 1840s rowhouse with the intricate cast-iron portico at 50 West 13th Street was not distinguished enough to warrant landmark protection on its architectural merits, noting that further study was needed to determine the building’s “cultural significance within the context of Off Off Broadway theater.”

Consequently, the group, Village Preservation, has dived into the archives to try to demonstrate that the building is a worthy cultural landmark based not only on its theatrical history but also on an intriguing, newly unearthed piece of African-American history involving a prominent 19th-century Black businessman and abolitionist.

The new research “is very helpful and we have added it to our records,” Kate Lemos McHale, the commission’s research director, wrote the group on Feb. 24.

A commission spokeswoman added in a statement to The Times that the city “is absolutely committed to recognizing Black history in the urban landscape,” which is why the agency recently launched Preserving Significant Places of Black History, “a world-class story map and educational tool.” She said that the city would “continue to review” 50 West 13th Street.

A place of opportunity for generations of theatrical neophytes of varying talents, the quirky, no-frills 13th Street Repertory Company was an early stop for such performers as Richard Dreyfuss and Chazz Palminteri. “Line,” a one-act play by Israel Horovitz, ran there for more than 40 years, an Off Off Broadway record. And “Boy Meets Boy,” New York’s first hit gay musical, was first staged there in 1974, the brainchild of Bill Solly, an Englishman whom Ms. O’Hara had taken in and allowed to live upstairs from the theater.

Whether the show will go on is unknown. The building is owned by White Knight Ltd., of which Ms. O’Hara’s three children collectively own a little over a third. The balance of the shares are owned in equal proportion by Stephan Loewentheil, a bookseller, and his ex-wife, Beth Farber. The O’Haras and Mr. Loewentheil previously fought a bitter, yearslong real estate battle that ended, in 2010, with an agreement that allowed Ms. O’Hara and her theater to remain in the building until her death. There is no provision for what comes next.

The Thirteenth Street Repertory Company has been placed in the hands of its artistic director, Joe John Battista, who has vowed to continue making theater under the group’s name. But whether that will happen on 13th Street or elsewhere — and whether the building will ultimately be sold — depends on the outcome of an offstage drama.

“It’s all still in the air at this point,” said Jill O’Hara, one of Edith’s daughters, who sits on White Knight’s board. “It’s a complex situation that’s not made any easier by the history with this guy,” she added, referring to Mr. Loewentheil.

The building is managed for White Knight by Nate Loewentheil, the son of Mr. Loewentheil and Ms. Farber.

“As someone who cares deeply about cities, I appreciate the history of 50 West 13th Street,” Nate Loewentheil said, “but the building has fallen into very significant disrepair over the past 15 years, so we are trying to figure out our next steps.” (Both his parents declined to comment.)

Ms. O’Hara said that her mother believed that the building was once part of the Underground Railroad, the network of activists who helped enslaved African-Americans flee north to freedom before the Civil War. That belief has been perpetuated in local lore because a trap door in the theater’s dressing room leads to a hidden basement chamber unconnected to the rest of the basement.

Although no evidence has emerged to support the Underground Railroad rumor, new research, performed by Village Preservation and supplemented by an independent historian and a reporter, suggests that the claim may not be outlandish.

From 1858 to 1884, city directories and other records show, the house was owned by Jacob Day, a prominent African-American businessman active in abolitionism and other civil rights efforts. By 1871, Day was one of the wealthiest Black residents of New York City, according to The New York Times, with a net worth of more than $75,000, or around $1.6 million in today’s dollars.

An 1880 issue of The People’s Advocate called Day “the fashionable caterer of East Thirteenth Street” and identified him as a leading member of “a colored aristocracy” in the city. “Beginning as a waiter, by economy and thrift after years of struggle he saved money enough to go into business himself,” the paper noted, adding that Day owned “several fine houses.”

Newspaper articles appear to document Day’s involvement in civil rights causes over more than 30 years. In 1885, the year after his death, his efforts to further African-American self-determination were recognized in a history of Black Americans. “The Colored population of New York was equal to the great emergency that required them to put forth their personal exertions,” wrote George Washington Williams, spotlighting Day, along with his fellow Greenwich Village resident and abolitionist Dr. Henry Highland Garnet, for doing “much to elevate the Negro in self-respect and self-support.”

Born in New York around 1817 to parents who were also born in the city, Day appears to have been publicly active in Black civil-rights efforts as a young man. Along with such prominent abolitionists as the New York publisher and Underground Railroad leader David Ruggles, a man named Jacob Day was among a group in 1840 that called, in the pages of The National Anti-Slavery Standard, for a “National Reform Convention of the Colored Inhabitants of the United States of America,” an effort to combat the colonization movement that aimed to resettle Black Americans in Africa.

Day was also a prominent member and the longtime treasurer of the Abyssinian Baptist Church, the city’s second oldest Black church, which moved to nearby 166 Waverly Place shortly after Day bought his house and place of business on 13th Street.

Tom Calarco, the author of several books on the Underground Railroad, said that an 1852 article in The Standard suggested a strong connection between the church and leading Underground Railroad figures.

The newspaper report detailed an anti-colonization meeting at the church that had been called by the Committee of Thirteen, a vigorous Underground Railroad organization. The Rev. John T. Raymond, the church’s pastor, was a member of the committee and served as president at the 1852 meeting.

Day was “a major leader of the Black community, and he was connected up with other important people that were in the abolitionist movement,” Mr. Calarco said. “We know for at least 26 years, he was still participating in these important meetings with people who were leaders of the movement, so you have to make that assumption that he, if not directly, was indirectly involved in the Underground Railroad.”

Mr. Calarco also shared a document showing that in 1846, Day was one of a roster of African-Americans given land grants in the Adirondack region of upstate New York by Gerrit Smith, a major underwriter of the Underground Railroad.

Mr. Calarco speculated that Day may have used his wealth to fund Underground Railroad operations, whose conductors were often pressed for cash. “They needed the money,” he said, “to pay for the food, to pay for the travel, to pay for the clothes, to pay for people who helped transport” fugitives on boats and trains.

After the Civil War, with slavery abolished, Day worked to secure the vote for all Black people in New York State. In 1866, The Standard reported, he was one of a group that called for a convention to remove the discriminatory provision in the state constitution that barred Black people from voting unless they owned property valued at the considerable sum of $250. “The war of steel is over … but the war of ideas must go on until in this country true democratic principles shall prevail,” the group wrote, echoing today’s battles over voter suppression.

In 1871, a year after the 15th Amendment to the United States Constitution finally prohibited the federal government and the states from denying or abridging the right to vote based on race or color, a massive jubilee parade of Black citizens wended its way uptown from Washington Square, with throngs of Black and white New Yorkers lining the route. At a “grand mass meeting” at the Cooper Union, The Times reported, Day was among the officers who issued a resolution declaring that the 15th Amendment could only improve the lot of Black Americans if “the exercise of the ballot shall at once be made safe, and our right to exercise it be maintained by civil authority.”

In 1880, when the Black civil rights leader Frederick Douglass spoke at a rally for the Republican presidential candidate James A. Garfield at the Cooper Union, Day was among the prominent citizens, Black and white, assembled onstage around him.

During the period Day lived on 13th Street, the city’s largest African-American neighborhood, known as Little Africa, had developed nearby south of Washington Square, around Minetta Lane and Minetta and Bleecker Streets. The Abyssinian Baptist Church, whose finances Day managed, had moved to the Village to serve this population. So did the Freedman’s Savings Bank, an institution founded to help former slaves after the Civil War. Day kept an account at the bank, perhaps to support its mission.

Reflecting on Day’s house on 13th Street, Sylviane A. Diouf, a historian of the African Diaspora who curated a digital exhibit called “Black New Yorkers” for the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, said: “It’s important to preserve and show that there was an African and then an African-American presence in that area from the Dutch years and that they had institutions and businesses. It’s important to stress that, contrary to what people think, African-Americans didn’t just arrive in Harlem during the Great Migration, but they had a presence for 300 years before that.”

By the late 19th century, fierce competition for housing from Italian immigrants was already pushing Black residents uptown from the Village to the Tenderloin district. And some of the lingering physical remnants of Little Africa were demolished in the 1920s by the extension of Sixth Avenue from Carmine Street to Canal Street.

“Virtually all of the great institutions and landmarks and homes of leading figures of the 19th-century African-American community of Greenwich Village have been lost or highly compromised,” saidAndrew Berman, the executive director of Village Preservation. “50 west 13th Street is one of very few remaining homes of a leading African-American figure, not just in business but in the civil rights arena, that is largely intact from the many decades that he lived and worked there in the 19th century.”

For weekly email updates on residential real estate news, sign up here. Follow us on Twitter: @nytrealestate.

Sours: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/12/realestate/streetscapes-greenwich-village.html
13 West 13th Street Apartment Walk Through

13 West 13th Street, 7-FS

Norville House, Greenwich Village, Manhattan, NY 10011

WEB ID: 6361141

in contract

2 BEDS | 1 BATH | Co-op

5 AVENUE and AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS

$1,135,000
    • Maintenance/Common Charges: $2,519
    • 25% Down: $283,750
  • 2 BEDS

  • 1 BATHS

  • POST-WAR

  • S EXPOSURE

  • BUILT 1962

The Details
About 13 West 13Th Street, 7-FS, Greenwich Village, Manhattan, NY 10011

Introducing apartment 7FS at the Norville House. Located in the heart of Greenwich Village, this top floor, light-filled two bedroom apartment is spacious and welcoming. Meticulously renovated, no detail has been left unturned.
Upon entering the apartment, you are greeted with a warmth and charm that beckons you inward. With oversized windows and southern exposure, natural light bathe...

Listing Courtesy of Compass

Greenwich Village

NYC’s village neighborhoods, collectively, stretch across Manhattan from Houston Street on the south to 14th Street on the north. The borders of central Greenwich Village are roughly Third and Sixth avenues (larger Greenwich Village includes the West Village, but the West Village has its own neighborhood vibe and is described separately). Today, a mix of residents are drawn by its lively energy and commercial activity around Union Square and on Broadway and Sixth Avenue. New York University, housed in a number of buildings around Washington Square, adds to the character of the area. Washington Square, the heart of the neighborhood, is one of New York’s iconic destinations. Visit on a warm spring day, with street musicians performing and political activists gathering under the arch dedicated to George Washington, and it becomes clear that much of Greenwich Village’s traditional character remains.

about the building

13 West 13Th Street

Apartment Building in Greenwich Village

5 AVENUE and AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS

82 UNITS

6 STORIES

1962 BUILT

Learn more about Norville House

Sales History

Sales History for NORVILLE HOUSE

10/18/20213CS$930,000021
09/23/20217-AS$712,500011
07/20/20213ABN$1,350,000021

All information furnished regarding property for sale, rental or financing is from sources deemed reliable, but no warranty or representation is made as to the accuracy thereof and same is submitted subject to errors, omissions, change of price, rental or other conditions, prior sale, lease or financing or withdrawal without notice. All dimensions are approximate. For exact dimensions, you must hire your own architect or engineer. Images may be digitally enhanced photos, virtually staged photos, artists' renderings of future conditions, or otherwise modified, and therefore may not necessarily reflect actual site conditions. Accordingly, interested parties must confirm actual site conditions for themselves, in person.

Sours: https://www.corcoran.com/homes-for-sale/13-west-13-th-street-7fs-manhattan-ny-10011/vow/6361141/regionId=1

Similar news:

I hastened to clarify the situation. - Not. Why is that. Everything is exactly so, - she quickly answered and helped me to immerse the fighter in the very depths of her body. - In.



3711 3712 3713 3714 3715