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Mutual Fund Center

Mutual Fund Screener

Use the Mutual Fund Screener to narrow down the thousands of available mutual funds to a manageable list that meets your criteria. Screening criteria include returns, Morningstar ratings, expenses, asset class/category, and more.

WellsTrade Mutual Fund Screened List

View a list of mutual funds, pre-screened based on objective criteria to help make selecting easier. The list is updated quarterly, and the funds are available for purchase with a WellsTrade brokerage account. Funds available through WellsTrade may not be available through Wells Fargo Advisors.

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Our full-service brokerage, Wells Fargo Advisors, offers you the helpful support of an investment professional in person or by phone. Funds available through Wells Fargo Advisors may not be available through WellsTrade.

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What is a mutual fund?

A mutual fund is an investment company that pools money from many investors and invests the combined holdings in a single portfolio of securities including stocks, bonds, other securities or assets or some combination of these investments. It is professionally managed according to stated investment objectives found in the fund’s prospectus.

Most mutual funds are managed by investment advisers who are registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission. It is the fund's manager who is responsible for selecting the fund's investments in an effort to meet the fund's objectives and implement its strategies.

Today, a wide variety of mutual funds are available and many funds are increasingly complex or specialized or employ complicated investment strategies, including hedging and leveraging through short selling and derivatives and might invest in assets such as global real estate, commodities, leveraged loans, start-up companies and unlisted securities.

It is important to have a complete understanding of the investment strategies and underlying products to understand the mutual fund’s value to associated risks. For example, the level and type of risk associated with mutual funds may vary significantly from one fund to another. Complex funds in particular are subject to a number of risks, including increased volatility and greater potential for loss, and are not appropriate for all investors. Before investing in any mutual fund, you should read about these risks, which are explained in detail in each mutual fund’s prospectus, and discuss your investment goals and objectives with your Financial Advisor.

Because each fund pursues its own unique investment objectives, each fund has its own set of specific risks. There is no assurance any Fund will achieve its investment objective. All investing involves risk including the possible loss of principal. Investments fluctuate with changes in market conditions due to numerous factors some of which may be unpredictable.

Options involve risk and are not appropriate for all investors.  Before opening an option position, a person must receive a copy of “Characteristics and Risks of Standardized Options.”  This is available from the Options Clearing Corporation or any listed options exchange.  You should read it carefully before investing.

Investment and Insurance Products are:
  • Not Insured by the FDIC or Any Federal Government Agency
  • Not a Deposit or Other Obligation of, or Guaranteed by, the Bank or Any Bank Affiliate
  • Subject to Investment Risks, Including Possible Loss of the Principal Amount Invested

Investment products and services are offered through Wells Fargo Advisors. Wells Fargo Advisors is a trade name used by Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC (WFCS) and Wells Fargo Advisors Financial Network, LLC, Members SIPC, separate registered broker-dealers and non-bank affiliates of Wells Fargo & Company.

WellsTrade® and Intuitive Investor® accounts are offered through WFCS.

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Mutual Funds: Diversify Your Investing

  • They are professionally managed and available at different investment minimums.
  • You’re getting exposure to a larger portfolio and spreading the risk.
  • Allow access to broad markets or focus on specific sectors or industries.

Diversification with mutual funds

If you’re like most investors with a retirement plan, chances are you hold shares in mutual funds. In fact, today more than half of all 401(k) plan assets are held in mutual funds.1 Mutual funds offer the advantage of professional management along with the potential benefits of diversification.

With so many choices, how do you know where to start?

From the beginning

As a mutual fund shareholder, you’re pooling your money with other investors to invest in securities such as stocks, bonds, cash and other investments. Having a diversified portfolio can help to spread out risk. Your shares represent part ownership of the fund, which in turn, gives you a “proportional right” to any income and capital gains generated from the investments.2

Mutual funds are popular because they offer an efficient way to diversify your investments without having to make a large initial outlay, and they’re generally cost-effective. Because a mutual fund manager researches, and selects the fund’s investments, and manages the fund’s allocation, rebalancing the portfolio when needed, and monitors the fund’s performance, you do not have to.

Redemption is also convenient. You can place an order to redeem your shares at the next available Net Asset Value (NAV). Your shares will be redeemed at the NAV determined after the close of the New York Stock Exchange at 4:00 PM Eastern Time.

Determine your objectives

call out The more clearly you define your investment objectives and your tolerance for risk, the better you’ll be able to determine which mutual funds are appropriate for you. end call out

The more clearly you define your investment objectives and your tolerance for risk, the better you’ll be able to determine which mutual funds are appropriate for you. As a mutual fund investor, you have goals for your investment. Start by choosing mutual funds that match your investment objectives, risk tolerance, and time horizon.

For example, let’s say your primary investment objective is generating income. You would look for funds providing ongoing, steady cash flow. On the other hand, if your objective is growth, you can invest in equity funds that have long-term growth of capital as the objective. If you’re not interested in seeing your account value fluctuate widely, then preservation of capital may be for you. Some mutual funds provide a combination of two or three of these objectives.

The more clearly you define your investment objectives and your tolerance for risk, the better you’ll be able to determine which mutual funds are appropriate for you.

Make your choice

There are thousands of mutual funds from which to choose. How do you know which funds meet your investment objective and tolerance for risk? Start by looking into some key fund categories:

  • Stock funds. Representing the largest mutual fund category, these funds invest in equities (e.g., large or small companies, domestic and international companies). Within this vast category of funds, you’ll find funds of varying investment objectives, sectors and geographic regions.
  • Bond funds. Also referred to as “fixed-income” funds, these funds may invest in a wide range of debt securities which can include municipal, U.S. government, corporate or foreign debt.
  • Money market funds. Often described as “cash alternatives,” these funds, by law, can invest only in certain high-quality, short-term investments with maturities of less than 13 months. Although they seek to maintain a stable NAV at $1 dollar per share and are considered less risky, it is possible to lose money investing in these funds.
  • Balanced funds. Sometimes referred to as “hybrid funds,” these funds invest in a combination of stocks and bonds. They may offer income, capital appreciation, or both.

Each mutual fund states its investment objectives prominently in its prospectus.

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) lists some of the individual funds within these categories within the Fund Analyzer (https://tools.finra.org/fund_analyzer/) available at www.finra.org. Whether growth, value, sector, target-date, etc., each fund has an investment objective and focus.

Assess your risk

Before buying a mutual fund, there’s a lot to think over. You must consider all facets of the fund, including its investment objectives, the type of securities it owns, the strategies the fund uses to meet its objectives, the potential return, and any risks involved in owning the fund.

For details about the fund, including its investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses, refer to its prospectus.

Consider both advantages and disadvantages

Mutual fund advantages include:

  • Diversification. You own a small part in a large portfolio of investments. This lessens the chance a drop in any single fund holding will have a big impact on your fund’s account value.
  • Professional management. You don’t have to be the expert if you don’t want to be. A professional portfolio manager is making the investment decisions for the fund.
  • Redemption. You can generally enter an order to sell your fund’s shares at any time the market is open. Your shares will be redeemed at 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time or after the New York Stock Exchange closes on the day you entered the sell transaction.
  • Minimum investment. You generally don’t need to have a large initial investment to own a particular fund. You can purchase a variety of funds for your portfolio.

But, mutual funds also have disadvantages, including but not limited to:

  • Fluctuation. Mutual funds experience price fluctuations similar to those of the securities that make up the fund. Make sure you understand the level of volatility for the fund and your tolerance for market swings.
  • No guarantees. Mutual funds cannot guarantee returns. Your shares, when sold, may be worth more or less that their original cost. Also, mutual funds are not guaranteed or insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or any other government agency. Unlike a bank deposit, which is insured by the FDIC up to applicable limits, mutual funds have no such guarantee.
  • Expenses. Mutual funds have annual operating costs, which include marketing, distribution and management and other fees. You may also pay transaction costs, which include commission fees and other sales charges.
  • Lack of control. Because you don’t pick the investments in a mutual fund, you don’t have influence over which securities the fund manager buys and sells. You also can’t pick the timing or level of capital gains, if any, the fund will realize.

Mutual funds vs. ETFs

call out While mutual funds have been popular for decades, exchange traded funds (ETFs) are relatively new but have been gaining in popularity. end call out

While mutual funds have been popular for decades, exchange traded funds (ETFs) are relatively new but have been gaining in popularity. As with mutual funds, ETFs are pools of investments. They may have lower expenses than mutual funds because of their passive structure (however, some mutual funds (index funds) are also passive in nature).

In addition, ETFs, like stocks, are traded throughout the day on a national stock exchange. Mutual funds are not traded and can be redeemed only once per day after the markets close, generally at 4 p.m. Eastern Time or after the New York Stock Exchange closes.

Below is a comparison chart highlighting some of the key similarities and differences between mutual funds and ETFs.

Mutual FundETF
Portfolio of investmentsYesYes
Pricing FrequencyEnd of dayThroughout the day
Minimum investmentYesNo
Active or passively managedGenerally activeGenerally passive
Relatively low initial costYesYes
TaxesGenerally less tax efficientGenerally tax efficient
Fee or commission to tradeVaries*Varies*

*except in fee-based advisory accounts

Mutual fund key points

Mutual funds have been around for nearly a century. They are accessible at generally low minimums, provide access to professional management, and are a way to have part ownership of a professionally researched and managed portfolio (however, some mutual funds (index funds) are also passive in nature).

As with any investment choice, there are no guarantees your mutual fund will meet its objectives. All investing involves risk including the possible loss of principal. Mutual funds have risks, and their taxes and fees can lower any return.

Next steps

  • Mutual funds are popular because they offer diversification and are professionally managed.
  • Mutual fund investing offers those with limited time a way to have part ownership of a professionally researched and managed portfolio.
  • Like all investments, mutual funds have risks, and their taxes and fees can lower any return.
  • Mutual funds are different from ETFs.

1401(k) assets held in mutual funds – Investment Company Institute/FAQs

2FINRA Investors – Smart Investing: Introduction to Mutual Funds

All investing involves some degree of risk, whether it is associated with market volatility, purchasing power or a specific security. There is no assurance any investment strategy will be successful or that a fund will meet its investment objectives. Stocks are more volatile than bonds and are subject to greater risks. Bonds are subject to interest rate, price and credit risks. Prices tend to be inversely affected by changes in interest rates. An investment in a mutual fund or exchange–traded fund (ETF) will fluctuate and shares, when sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. ETFs are subject to risks similar to those of stocks and may yield investment results that, before expenses, generally correspond to the price and yield of a particular index. There is no assurance that the price and yield performance of the index can be fully matched.

An investment in a money market fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or any other government agency. Although money market funds seek to preserve the value of your investment at $1.00 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in a money market fund.

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Types of Investments — Mutual Funds

What they are

A mutual fund is an investment company that pools money from many investors and invests the combined holdings in a single portfolio of securities that may include stocks, bonds, other securities and cash and cash alternatives, such as Treasury Bills, certificates of deposit (CDs) and money market funds. It is professionally managed according to stated investment objectives found in the fund’s prospectus. An investor then owns shares of the mutual fund and not the individual securities the fund holds.

Mutual funds are sold by prospectus only. The prospectus is a legal document which contains information on the fund’s investment objectives or goals, principal strategies for achieving those goals, principal risks of investing in the fund, fees, charges and expenses, past performance and other important information you should consider before investing.

How they work

Mutual funds generally offer broad diversification across different asset classes. Some mutual funds, such as target date or asset allocation funds, invest in other funds. These types of mutual funds offer diversification across hundreds or even thousands of securities.

Diversification is an investment strategy used to manage risk. By spreading your investments across different asset classes, industry sectors and types of investments, the fund seeks to reduce risk from any one investment. Although diversification can help manage risk it cannot guarantee a profit or protect against loss.

Types:

In general, mutual funds fall into three broad categories: equity, fixed income (bond), and money market. Popular funds within these categories include target date, asset allocation, global/international, and specialty.

Most can be purchased through a brokerage account. You can also purchase mutual funds directly from the fund company or through a workplace retirement plan such as a 401(k), 403(b), or 457 plan.

Advantages and disadvantages

When you buy any investment, it's important to understand both its advantages and disadvantages. In the case of mutual funds, they include:

Advantages

  • Reduced risk through diversification. A diversified portfolio has the potential to provide more consistent returns through lowered volatility than investing in individual asset classes. Mutual funds are professionally managed portfolios that generally offer broad diversification in an effort to spread risk across a large number of securities, different asset classes, sectors, industries, and investment styles.
  • Professional management. Mutual funds are professionally managed, which means a fund manager selects the fund’s investments, monitors performance, and rebalances when necessary.
  • Ease of reinvestment. Mutual funds allow you to automatically reinvest any capital gain distributions or dividends. The option to reinvest earnings or income provides a base on which earnings can accumulate, thus providing the potential to generate greater earnings on your investment.
  • Convenience. Mutual funds are common and can generally be bought with a low initial investment.  You can sell your shares at any time the market is open at the fund’s current net asset value (NAV), which is usually set at 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time or after the New York Stock Exchange closes.

Disadvantages

  • No guaranteed return. Mutual funds cannot guarantee returns. Your shares, when sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Also, mutual funds are not guaranteed or issued by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or any other government agency. Unlike a bank deposit, which is insured by the FDIC up to applicable limits, mutual funds have no such guarantee.
  • Market risk. Mutual funds are subject to market risk. The securities within the fund may fluctuate in response to general economic and market conditions and the perception of investors. Some funds may experience greater volatility than others. It is important to understand the fund’s level of volatility and your tolerance for market swings before investing.
  • Some have high expense ratios and fees. Some mutual funds have expense ratios that many experts consider high, as well as costly advertising fees and sales charges. You may also pay transaction costs, which include commission fees and other sales charges.
  • Lack of control. Because you don’t pick the investments in a mutual fund, you don’t have influence over which securities the fund manager buys and sells. You also can’t pick the timing or level of capital gains, if any, the fund will realize.

Ways to help manage risk

Know what you own. Reading a fund’s prospectus is a good way to learn about the fund, its goals, and fees. 

Don’t rely on market news. While it may be tempting to buy a fund you’ve heard good things about, try to avoid buying a fund solely based on past performance. Keep in mind that markets are cyclical — which means they go up, peak, and go down again. Buying or selling investments following market news may leave you one step behind the markets.

A carefully considered investment plan designed for long-term investing and based on your target asset allocation strategy can help you reach your long-term goals. An asset allocation strategy is an investment strategy that seeks to balance risk and reward by dividing your money among different asset categories, such as stocks, bonds, and cash. Your recommended asset allocation strategy is based on your individual investment goal, time frame, and risk tolerance. Asset allocation cannot eliminate the risk of fluctuating prices and uncertain returns, and it does not guarantee profit or protect against loss in declining markets.

Understand the fees. Pay close attention to a fund’s annual fund operating expenses, (also known as its expense ratio) when selecting a mutual fund, as mutual fund expense ratios vary widely. Operating a mutual fund involves costs, which is why every mutual fund charges an expense ratio. The fund’s expense ratio includes the fund’s management, marketing, and distribution fees, as well as other expenses such as administrative services that are stated as a percentage, and are deducted from the fund’s assets annually, regardless of the fund’s performance.

A fund’s operating expenses can sometimes take a large amount of the fund’s returns over time. The fund’s prospectus lists all fees and expenses associated with an investment in the fund. Investors can use websites such as Morningstar.com to see how a fund's expenses compare to other funds in the same Morningstar category. The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) offers a Fund Analyzer with information and analysis on more than 18,000 mutual funds.

Monitor their performance. If you diversify your own portfolio using individual stocks and bonds, ensure you routinely monitor the performance, pricing, and creditworthiness of each investment. Investing in an all-in-one mutual fund, such as a target date fund or an asset allocation fund can save you time and help you stay on track to meet your goal.

A target date fund is a mutual fund that invests in other mutual funds rather than individual stocks and bonds with a target retirement year in mind. With this type of fund, the fund’s investments become more conservative as the “target retirement year” approaches, which generally means the fund invests more in bonds and cash than in stocks.

An asset allocation fund is a mutual fund that invests in other mutual funds rather than individual stocks, bonds and cash that seeks to maintain a certain allocation in the primary asset categories through its investments in underlying funds based on a set investment objective.

Risk Considerations:

All investing involves some degree of risk, whether it is associated with market volatility, purchasing power or a specific security. There is no assurance any investment strategy will be successful or that a fund will meet its investment objectives.  Investing in mutual funds involves risk, including the possible loss of principal. An investment in a mutual fund will fluctuate and, shares, when sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Each fund is subject to its own specific risks which are detailed in the prospectus. Before investing, you should read the prospectus for a complete description of the investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses associated with an investment in a specific fund.

Asset Allocation Funds are subject to the risks of the underlying funds in which they invest. These funds are also indirectly subject to the underlying fund expenses as well as the expenses of the portfolio and the cost of this type of investment may be higher than a mutual fund that only invests in stocks or bonds.

Target Date Funds are subject to the risks associated with the underlying funds in which they invest. These risks change over time as the fund’s asset allocation strategy adjusts as it approaches its target date. There is no assurance any target date fund will achieve its investment objective. The principal value of an investment in a target date fund is not guaranteed at any time including at its target date. Most target date funds invest in a combination of equity, fixed income and short-term funds and the cost of this type of investment may be higher than a mutual fund that only invests in stocks or bonds.

Investing internationally entails special risks such as currency, political, economic, and market risks. These risks are heightened in emerging markets. Specialty funds may involve more volatility than other funds because of their narrow focus.

Investment and Insurance Products are:
  • Not Insured by the FDIC or Any Federal Government Agency
  • Not a Deposit or Other Obligation of, or Guaranteed by, the Bank or Any Bank Affiliate
  • Subject to Investment Risks, Including Possible Loss of the Principal Amount Invested

Investment products and services are offered through Wells Fargo Advisors. Wells Fargo Advisors is a trade name used by Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC (WFCS) and Wells Fargo Advisors Financial Network, LLC, Members SIPC, separate registered broker-dealers and non-bank affiliates of Wells Fargo & Company.

Retirement Professionals are registered representatives of and offer brokerage products through Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC (WFCS). Discussions with Retirement Professionals may lead to a referral to affiliates including Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. WFCS and its associates may receive a financial or other benefit for this referral. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. is a banking affiliate of Wells Fargo & Company.

Information published by Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Wells Fargo Advisors, or one of its affiliates as part of this website is published in the United States and is intended only for persons in the United States.

WellsTrade® brokerage accounts are offered through WFCS.

Wells Fargo & Company and its affiliates do not provide legal or tax advice. In limited circumstances, tax advice may be provided by Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Please consult your legal and/or tax advisors to determine how this information, and any planned tax results may apply to your situation at the time your tax return is filed.

Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. is a bank affiliate of Wells Fargo & Company.

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Performance

Figures quoted represent past performance, which is no guarantee of future results, and do not reflect taxes that a shareholder may pay on an investment in a fund. Investment return, principal value, and yields of an investment will fluctuate so that an investor's shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Performance shown without sales charges would be lower if sales charges were reflected. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance data quoted and assumes the reinvestment of dividends and capital gains.

For Class A, the maximum front-end sales charge is 5.75%. For Class C, the maximum contingent deferred sales charge is 1.00%. Administrator, A2, Institutional, Premier, R, R4, R6, Select, and Service Class shares are sold without a front-end sales charge or contingent deferred sales charge.

The manager has contractually committed to certain fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements. Without these reductions, the fund’s returns would have been lower and rankings may have been lower. These reductions may be discontinued.

Performance including sales charge assumes the sales charge for the corresponding time period. Public offering price (POP) is the price of one share of a fund including any sales charges. Net asset value (NAV) is the value of one share of the fund excluding any sales charges.

Investing in all mutual funds entails risk. Information about the risks of investing in a fund is available in each fund's prospectus.

Returns for periods of less than one year are not annualized.

The Morningstar Rating™ for funds, or star rating, is calculated for managed products (including mutual funds, variable annuity and variable life subaccounts, exchange-traded funds, closed-end funds, and separate accounts) with at least a three-year history. Exchange-traded funds and open-ended mutual funds are considered a single population for comparative purposes. It is calculated based on a Morningstar risk-adjusted return measure that accounts for variation in a managed product's monthly excess performance, placing more emphasis on downward variations and rewarding consistent performance. The Morningstar Rating does not include any adjustment for sales loads. The top 10% of products in each product category receive 5 stars, the next 22.5% receive 4 stars, the next 35% receive 3 stars, the next 22.5% receive 2 stars, and the bottom 10% receive 1 star. The Overall Morningstar Rating for a managed product is derived from a weighted average of the performance figures associated with its 3-, 5-, and 10-year (if applicable) Morningstar Rating metrics. The weights are: 100% 3-year rating for 36-59 months of total returns, 60% 5-year rating/40% 3-year rating for 60-119 months of total returns, and 50% 10-year rating/30% 5-year rating/20% 3-year rating for 120 or more months of total returns. While the 10-year overall star rating formula seems to give the most weight to the 10-year period, the most recent 3-year period actually has the greatest impact because it is included in all three rating periods. The Morningstar Rating is for this class only; other classes may have different performance characteristics. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

Some of Morningstar’s proprietary calculations, including the Morningstar Rating™, are not customarily calculated based on adjusted historical returns. However, for new share classes/channels, Morningstar may calculate an extended-performance Morningstar Rating. The extended performance is calculated by adjusting the historical total returns of the oldest share class of a fund to reflect the fee structure of the younger share class/channel, attaching this data to the younger share class’s performance record, and then compounding the adjusted plus actual monthly returns into the extended-performance Morningstar risk-adjusted return for the 3-, 5-, and 10-year time periods. The Morningstar risk-adjusted returns are used to determine the extended-performance Morningstar Rating. The extended-performance Morningstar Rating for this fund does not affect the retail fund data published by Morningstar, as the bell curve distribution on which the ratings are based includes only funds with actual returns. The Overall Morningstar Rating for multi-share funds is based on actual performance only or extended performance only. Once the share class turns three years old, the Overall Morningstar Rating will be based on actual ratings only. The Overall Morningstar Rating for multi-share variable annuities is based on a weighted average of any ratings that are available. 

While the inclusion of pre-inception data in the form of extended performance can provide valuable insight into the probable long-term behavior of newer share classes of a fund, investors should be aware that an adjusted historical return can provide only an approximation of that behavior. For example, the fee structures of a retail share class will vary from that of an institutional share class, as retail shares tend to have higher operating expenses and sales charges. These adjusted historical returns are not actual returns. The underlying investments in the share classes used to calculate the pre-performance string likely will vary from the underlying investments held in the fund after inception. Calculation methodologies used by Morningstar may differ from those applied by other entities, including the fund itself.

© 2021 Morningstar. All rights reserved. The information contained herein is proprietary to Morningstar and/or its content providers; may not be copied or distributed; and is not warranted to be accurate, complete, or timely. Neither Morningstar nor its content providers are responsible for any damages or losses arising from any use of this information. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

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