How to run blender benchmark

How to run blender benchmark DEFAULT

Blender Open Data is a platform to collect, display and query the results of hardware and software performance tests - provided by the Blender community. You can download the Open Data Benchmark with versions for Windows, Linux and macOS.

You can select any number of 7 benchmarks to run on your choice of Blender version and render device (CPU / GPU). The benchmark will also gather non-identifiable data on your system setup. Once the benchmark is complete you can share your results on Blender Open Data publicly.

Anonymous Data

All data is kept anonymous by default. No personally identifiable information is collected or displayed. You can however enable a display name to be shown with your results in the Open Data settings.

We’ve built the Blender Benchmark platform with maximum focus on transparency and privacy. We only use free and open source software (GNU GPL), the testing content is public domain (CC0), and the test results are being shared anonymized as public domain data – free for anyone to download and to process further.

We believe this is the best way to invite the Blender community to contribute the results of their performance tests, and create a world-class Open Dataset for the entire CG industry.

Run Offline

You can also run the benchmark in a completely offline environment. In order to do so, download and extract the benchmark script, download and extract the scene you are interested in, enter the script directory and run the following command:

path-to-blender-executable --background \
--factory-startup \
-noaudio \
--debug-cycles \
--enable-autoexec \
--engine \
CYCLES \
scene-path.blend \
--python \
main.py \
-- \
--device-type CPU

This will output the benchmark result as the launcher would.

What data do we collect?

When running a benchmark, the software will collect some non-identifiable information about your system for analysis. For example, we collect the operating system (E.g. Windows, Linux or macOS) to compare how efficient Blender runs on each. You can expand the sample below which shows an example of all the data we collect.

Sours: https://www.techspot.com/downloads/7305-blender-benchmark.html

How Fast Is Your Computer?—New Blender Open Data Benchmark Available

The folks behind the open-source Blender 3D modeling, renderer, and animation software package for multiple desktop operating systems have produced a new benchmarks suite (Blender Open Data Benchmark) that is currently in beta. It is available for download now but being in beta means it is far from being truly stable.

About Blender Open Data

“Blender Benchmark is a new platform to collect and display the results of hardware and software performance tests,” says the description at its website here. The goal here really is to assist developers and track performance during Blender’s actual development. Having comparisons between systems and installations will be useful.

Blender Open Data Benchmark

01 – Blender Benchmark is a new computer performance benchmark testing suite aimed at the 3D software market professional.

The Blender Benchmark will compute performance for CUDA, OpenCL, and CPU, along with GPU performance. Your data from your system tests can be shared (and ideally is shared) anonymously with the Blender Open Data platform. The current fastest GPU is the NVIDIA Titan V, while the current fastest CPU is the AMD EPYC 7551 32-core processor, a chip aimed at server platforms.

Getting Started

To download the beta benchmark suite now click on the link here. A few words of caution, given that we naturally explored this a few times prior to writing this article.

Firstly, this is a beta and the benchmark suite did crash on us a few times on a machine running macOS El Capitan. That is version 10.11.6. We were more successful with macOS Yosemite (10.10.5) which is ironic and we will test soon newer machines we have explore on.

The quick test is recommended as the test is anything but really quick. This test is not as fast as other benchmarks like the one from Maxon (Cinebench). So plan on giving up your machine for a bit to run this test suite.

For more info: Blender Open Data

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Related

Sours: https://architosh.com/2018/10/how-fast-is-your-computer-new-blender-open-data-benchmark-available/
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Today we present the Blender Benchmark, a new platform to collect and display the results of hardware and software performance tests. With this benchmark we aim at an optimal comparison between system hardware and installations, and to assist developers to track performance during Blender development.

The benchmark consists of two parts: a downloadable package which runs Blender and renders on several production files, and the Open Data portal on blender.org, where the results will be (optionally) uploaded.

We’ve built the Blender Benchmark platform with maximum focus on transparency and privacy. We only use free and open source software (GNU GPL), the testing content is public domain (CC0), and the test results are being shared anonymized as public domain data – free for anyone to download and to process further.

We believe this is the best way to invite the Blender community to contribute the results of their performance tests, and create a world-class Open Dataset for the entire CG industry.

How does it work?

Users download the Benchmark Client and run one of the two benchmarks (‘quick’ or ‘complete’). The benchmark will gather information about the system, such as operating system, RAM, graphics cards, CPU model, as well as information about the performance of the system during the execution of the benchmark. After that, the user will be able to share the result online on the Blender Open Data platform, or to save the data locally.

In order to provide control over the data that is shared online, the benchmark result is first associated with the Blender ID of the user, and uploaded on mydata.blender.org, where the user will be able to redact and anonymize the parts containing personal information (Blender ID username and hostname). Currently this information is removed by default. No other personal information is collected.

Blender Open Data Architecture

Blender Open Data portal

In order to visualize, share and explore the data, we’ve built opendata.blender.org. The data hosted on the website is available under Public Domain, it is updated in near-realtime after every benchmark and it is easily processable and well documented.

While hosting Blender Benchmark results will be the initial purpose of the Open Data portal, we plan to host other data sets in the future. For example, information about Blender downloads, telemetry information, etc. Each data set published on the platform will adhere to our Open Data principles, and its collection will be clearly communicated.

Blender Open Data principles

As initial guideline for our definition of Blender Open Data, we were inspired by the Eight Principles of Open Data. We believe that Blender Open Data should be:

  • Complete. All public data is made available. Public data is data that is not subject to valid privacy, security or privilege limitations.
  • Primary. Data is as collected at the source, with the highest possible level of granularity, not in aggregate or modified forms.
  • Timely. Data is made available as quickly as necessary to preserve the value of the data.
  • Accessible. Data is available to the widest range of users for the widest range of purposes.
  • Machine processable. Data is reasonably structured to allow automated processing.
  • Non-discriminatory. Data is available to anyone, with no requirement of registration.
  • Non-proprietary. Data is available in a format over which no entity has exclusive control.
  • License-free. Data is not subject to any copyright, patent, trademark or trade secret regulation. Reasonable privacy, security and privilege restrictions may be allowed.
  • Online and Free. Information is not meaningfully public if it is not available on the Internet at no charge, or at least no more than the marginal cost of reproduction. It should also be findable.
  • Permanent. Data should be made available at a stable Internet location indefinitely and in a stable data format for as long as possible.

We take a privacy-conscious approach when handling Benchmark data.

Timeline

  • August 10th: public beta; a test run to verify if everything works. Send feedback to devtalk.blender.org.
  • September: first official release.

Credits

The project has been developed by the team at Blender: Brecht van Lommel, Dan MacGrath, Francesco Siddi, Markus Ritberger, Pablo Vazquez, Sybren Stüvel and Sergey Sharybin.This project was commissioned by Ton Roosendaal, chairman Blender Foundation.

Sours: https://www.blender.org/news/introducing-blender-benchmark/
Blender Benchmarks: How to render faster in blender cycles vs cycles x (CPU vs CUDA vs Optix)

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To run blender benchmark how

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How to Choose the RIGHT CPU for Blender - Real-World Benchmarks

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