Fitbit versa 2 stress tracking

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Fitbit stress score explained: How stress tracking and management works

Fitbit has rolled stress tracking features out to all of its existing devices, as the company makes a play for mindfulness.

The announcement was made during James Park’s keynote for the launch of the Fitbit Luxe, the company’s premium grade fitness tracker.

We explain the stress score, and how you can use it. And don't forget our guide to wearable stress tracking and other devices that use the feature in different ways.

Which Fitbit devices can track stress?

Fitbit introduced Stress Management last year as part of the Fitbit Sense, which has a focus on mindfulness.

But now the daily stress score has been opened up to users of:

How does Fitbit stress management work?

 Fitbit stress management

Stress management scores in action

The Stress Management feature sits on the Fitbit Dashboard.

It tracks three metrics from your wrist: heart rate variability, exertion and sleep data to generate a single stress score.

Non-Premium users will just see their daily stress score, while those that have paid for Fitbit’s subscription service will see a full breakdown.

And you can add your own feedback on how you're feeling on any given day – however, the app doesn't use this feedback to train the algorithm.

Fitbit is making a play for mindfulness and has recently teamed up with Deepak Chopra to deliver Mindful Method content for Fitbit Premium.

How do you use it to manage stress?

How do you use it to manage stress?

The idea of the Stress Management score is to identify spikes in stress and then take action. Sadly, your Fitbit wearable can't destress for you – but there are tools on hand.

Most Fitbit devices have a guided breathing mode – which can help reduce stressful feelings. But improving your stress score means focusing on the individual aspects of the score. Hitting your fitness goals and getting Active Zone Minutes in will help with the exertion score, and you'll need some decent kip.

Pre-bed meditation can be a big boost to deep sleep and sleep quality – and there's a host of mindfulness content within the Fitbit app. You'll find that in the Discover section, if you're a Fitbit Premium user. The company has added content by meditation guru Deepak Chopra.

The Mindful Method series with Deepak Chopra consists of 30 meditations. Initial sessions have names like “Fall Asleep with Deepak Chopra’s Guided Beach Visualization”, “Managing stress at all times” and “Cultivate and abundance mindset”. They range from three minutes to 20 minutes long.

The Deepak Chopra content joins existing mindfulness content from Fitbit, although it clearly hopes this will attract new users into Fitbit Premium, which costs £7.99 per month or £79.99 per year.

"Our Stress Management Score was designed to help you understand your body's ability to handle stress, which is an important health metric that can impact your physical and mental health, said Dr. Samy Abdel-Ghaffar, research scientist behind Fitbit's Stress Management.

"If you receive a high score, it means you're showing fewer signs of physical stress, so you may consider taking on a new project or exercising, whereas if your score is lower you may want to give yourself a break by going to bed early or meditating."

"Over time, your score can help you understand connections between your stress level and your daily activities like exercise and sleep habits," he continued.

And that's the message from Fitbit. The stress score is designed to help you understand and quantify your mindfulness and build a connection between your habits and you mental health. What you do with that information is up to you.

Stress score vs EDA score

Fitbit stress score explained: How stress tracking and management works

The Stress Management feature is separate to the EDA sensor tech found on the Fitbit Sense that detects your skin’s stress response during guided breathing and meditation sessions.

That tracks physical stress responses, either on a spot-test or during some of the EDA compatible mindfulness sessions from Fitbit Premium.

FitbitFitness trackersHealth and wellbeing


Sours: https://www.wareable.com/fitbit/fitbit-brings-stress-score-to-all-devices-8394

Fitbit rolling out stress tracking to its other fitness trackers and smartwatches

(Pocket-lint) - Fitbit's CEO James Park announced during the company's Luxe fitness tracker reveal event that it would be rolling out its stress management feature to its other fitness trackers and smartwatches, including the Versa 3, Charge 4 and Inspire 2.

The premium Fitbit Luxe fitness tracker - which places a focus on fashion and style - is the second device from Fitbit to offer the stress management feature, which originally launched on the Fitbit Sense smartwatch.

The feature offers users a daily Stress Score, which is derived from heart rate variability data, sleep data and exertion data. It appears on the Fitbit Dashboard and users can provide feedback on any given day, though the feedback isn't taken into account to provide the score or change it.

Fitbit Premium users will get a breakdown of their Stress Score, while normal Fitbit users will only get the score itself. The idea of the Stress Score is to help users identify days with higher stress levels in order to understand their body's ability to handle stress, as well as promote action to reduce it, such as going to bed earlier or doing a guided breathing session on their fitness tracker or smartwatch, for example. 

Best Fitbit fitness tracker 2021: Which Fitbit is right for you?
Best Fitbit fitness tracker 2021: Which Fitbit is right for you? By Britta O'Boyle ·

Fitbit is rolling out the stress management feature to the Versa 3, Versa 2, Charge 4 and Inspire 2 from 20 April. Make sure your Fitbit app is up to date in order to get the feature.

Writing by Britta O'Boyle. Originally published on .

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Sours: https://www.pocket-lint.com/fitness-trackers/news/fitbit/156620-fitbit-rolling-out-stress-tracking-to-all-fitness-trackers-and-smartwatches
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How to Track Your Stress Levels With a Fitbit

We all know Fitbit’s smartwatches track your daily physical activity, but they can now help you track your stress levels, too. Fitbit recently announced the rollout of Fitbit Sense’s Stress Management tracking to the Fitbit Versa 3, Versa 2, Luxe, Charge 4, and Inspire 2.

These Fitbit devices will now calculate a daily stress management “score” based on a variety of factors, including your heart rate, physical activity levels, and sleep data. The Fitbit Sense also tracks electrodermal activity (EDA) to check for “fight or flight” responses.

Anyone who uses one of the supported Fitbit devices can check their daily stress score from the Fitbit app’s dashboard page. The score ranges from 1 to 100—but note that figure is not a measurement of how “stressed” you are, per se. Rather, a higher score means you’re doing more to reduce your daily stress—such as getting enough (but not too much) daily physical activity, getting adequate high-quality sleep every night, and using Fitbit’s premium mindfulness exercises.

Free users will see their overall daily scores, while Fitbit premium subscribers will get a more detailed breakdown of each tracked criteria, which will show you if you need to get more sleep or step up your gym time to get those stress-reducing hormones pumping.

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A perfect score doesn’t necessarily mean you’re not feeling stressed or anxious, mind you. It simply means your body is showing fewer signs of physical stress, and therefore is less likely to experience stress-inducing reactions.

That said, the Fitbit App’s Stress Management menu also has a check-in option that you can use to jot down some notes how you felt that day. Here’s how to use it:

  1. In the Fitbit app, tap “Stress management.”
  2. Scroll down and tap “How are you feeling?” under the Reflections section.
  3. Select the mood that best fits how you felt that day.
  4. Tap “Log reflection” to save your selection.

These check-ins are optional and are not factored into your daily Stress Management score. There are only five options—ranging from very stressed to very calm—so there’s not much room for nuanced feedback. Still, recording your feelings will help correlate your subjective experience with the data your Fitbit collects. Hopefully having all of this information on hand will give you peace of mind, and not just make you agitated as you try to game another app to boost your results.

[Wareable]

TechComputing

Sours: https://lifehacker.com/how-to-track-your-stress-levels-with-a-fitbit-1846742149
Fitbit Sense New Metrics: Stress Management and Health Metrics

How do I track and manage stress with my Fitbit device?

Track and manage stress in a variety of ways with the Fitbit app and your Fitbit device.

ClosedWhy should I track my response to stress?

Stress is how your body responds to the demands of everyday life. The source of stress can be positive, like a promotion or new baby, or negative, like an overwhelming workload or traumatic life event. In response to stress, the autonomic nervous system releases hormones, which provide the body with a burst of energy (known as the “fight or flight” response). This process can raise your heart rate, change your skin’s sweat level, and make you more alert or tense.

Small bursts of stress can motivate you to meet a deadline or goal, but an elevated stress level for an extended period of time can negatively affect your health and well-being. Continued strain on your body from unmanaged stress could lead to health problems, such as heart disease, high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes, depression, or anxiety.

Mindfulness tile

The Mindfulness tile in the Fitbit app includes mindfulness sessions and can help you track and understand the effects of your mindfulness practice.

ClosedWhy should I practice mindfulness with the Fitbit app?

Mindfulness is a stress management tool where you focus on being aware of what you're sensing and feeling in the moment, without interpretation or judgment. In the Fitbit app, choose a weekly mindfulness goal, set reminders to complete a mindfulness session, reflect on your stress level, and more.

ClosedHow do I change my mindfulness goal in the Fitbit app?

To start, your goal is 5 days per week.

To change your goal:

  1. From the Today tab , tap the Mindfulness tile .
  2. Tap the gear icon in the top right.
  3. Choose the number of days that you want to practice mindfulness.
  4. Tap the arrow in the top left, and tap Done.

Relax app

The Relax app can help you find moments of calm throughout the day with personalized, deep breathing sessions.

ClosedWhat are the benefits of deep breathing?

Deep breathing is a common meditation technique that can help you let go of stress and maintain a quieter state of mind. Research shows that taking a few minutes to relax each day can help reduce blood pressure and lower your risk of cardiovascular disease.

ClosedHow do I start a guided breathing session?

For instructions, choose your device.

ClosedBlaze
  1. On your device, navigate to the Relax screen.
  2. The 2-minute session is the first option, but you can swipe to choose the 5-minute session.
  3. Tap the screen and then tap the play symbol in the bottom right to start the session.
  4. Remain still and breathe deeply during the calibration period, which lasts 30-40 seconds. The phrase “sensing your breathing” will appear on your screen.
  5. When prompted, follow the guide (the circle on your screen) and breathe deeply. You can close your eyes because your watch will vibrate when it's time to inhale and exhale. If you want to turn off the vibration, tap the gear icon on the Relax screen.
  6. After you complete the exercise, press the back button to return to the menu.

Note: You can’t pause the session, but you can quit at any time. To exit, press the back button on your watch.

ClosedCharge 2
  1. On your tracker, navigate to the Relax screen.
  2. The 2-minute session is the first option, but you can tap to choose the 5-minute session.
  3. Press and hold the button to start the session.
  4. Remain still and breathe deeply during the calibration period, which lasts 30-40 seconds. The phrase “sensing your breathing” will appear on your tracker’s screen.
  5. When prompted, follow the guide (the circle on your screen) and breathe deeply. You can close your eyes because your tracker will vibrate when it's time to inhale and exhale.
  6. After you’ve completed the exercise, press the button to return to the menu.

Note: You can’t pause the session, but you can quit at any time. To exit, press and hold the button on your tracker.

ClosedCharge 3 and Charge 4
  1. On your device, tap the Relax app.
  2. The 2-minute session is the first option. To choose the 5-minute session:
    • Charge 3 and Charge 4—Swipe left.
    • Ionic and Versa series—Tap the gear icon . Press the back button to return to the Relax screen.
  3. Tap the play icon to start the session.
  4. Remain still and breathe deeply during the calibration period, which lasts 30-40 seconds. The phrase “sensing your breathing” appears on your screen.
  5. When prompted, follow the on-screen guide (the circle on your screen) and breathe deeply. You can close your eyes because your device vibrates when it's time to inhale and exhale.
  6. After the session, you see a summary that shows your alignment (how closely you followed the breathing prompt), your heart rate at the start and end of the session, and how many days you completed a guided breathing session this week.

Note: You can’t pause the session, but you can quit at any time by pressing the back button.

ClosedInspire HR and Inspire 2
  1. On your device, open the Relax app. The 2-minute session is the first option. Swipe up to choose the 5-minute session.
  2. Tap the play icon to start the session.
  3. Remain still and breathe deeply during the calibration period, which lasts 30-40 seconds. The phrase “sensing your breathing” appears on your screen.
  4. When prompted, follow the on-screen guide (the circle on your screen) and breathe deeply. You can close your eyes because your device vibrates when it's time to inhale and exhale.
  5. After the session, you see a summary that shows your alignment (how closely you followed the breathing prompt), your heart rate at the start and end of the session, and how many days you completed a guided breathing session this week.

Note: You can’t pause the session, but you can quit at any time by pressing the button (buttons on Inspire 2).

ClosedIonic, Sense, and Versa series
  1. On your device, tap the Relax app .
  2. The 2-minute session is the first option. To choose the longer session:
    • Ionic, Versa, Versa 2, and Versa Lite Edition—Tap the gear icon . Press the back button to return to the Relax screen. Tap the play icon to start the session.
    • Sense and Versa 3—Tap Edit, tap the time, then swipe to set the duration. Tap the duration, and swipe up to tap Start.
  3. Remain still and breathe deeply during the calibration period. The phrase “sensing your breathing” appears on your screen.
  4. When prompted, follow the on-screen guide (the circle on your screen) and breathe deeply. Your device vibrates when it's time to inhale and exhale.
    Relax app with the time remaining in the session
  5. On Sense and Versa 3, choose to log your reflection after the session, or tap Skip.
  6. See a summary of your session and how many days of mindfulness you completed this week.
  7. For Sense and Versa 3, open the Fitbit app and tap the Mindfulness tile to see more details about the session and your mindfulness practice history.

Note: You can’t pause the session, but you can quit at any time by pressing the button.

ClosedLuxe
  1. On Luxe, swipe right or left to the Relax app and tap to open it.
  2. To begin a session the same length as your previous session, tap Start. To set a custom length of time for the session:
    1. Swipe up and tap Custom.
    2. Swipe up or down to choose the number of minutes, then tap to set the minutes.
    3. Tap Start.
  3. Follow the on-screen instructions. When you're done, view your summary, and tap Done to close the app.

Relax app screen

ClosedAre there any health risks associated with doing a guided breathing session?

During the deep breathing session, you should feel comfortable and relaxed. If you feel like you’re unable to complete the full session, you can quit at any time. If you start to feel dizzy, faint, weak, or any other discomfort, stop the session immediately and return to breathing normally. If the feeling persists, lie down until you feel better, and consider seeking medical attention if symptoms continue to persist. Use caution or consult your doctor before use if you have any pre-existing cardiac or respiratory conditions.

Stress Management Score

Your stress management score in the Fitbit app can help you see how your body responds to stress based on your heart rate, sleep, and activity level data. You can also reflect on how stressed you are to see connections between how you feel and your score. This tile is available for Fitbit Charge 4, Fitbit Charge 5, Fitbit Inspire 2, Fitbit Luxe, Fitbit Sense, Fitbit Versa 2, and Fitbit Versa 3 users.

ClosedHow do I use my stress management score?

On a daily basis, your score can help you plan for your day:

  • A high score indicates that your body is showing fewer signs of physical stress, so you may consider taking on a new project or exercising.
  • A low score indicates that your body may be showing signs of stress, so you may want to take a break—go to bed early or meditate.

Over time, see trends in how your body responds to stress and how the actions you take affect your overall stress level.

ClosedHow is my stress management score calculated in the Fitbit app?

The score ranges from 1 to 100. A higher score indicates that your body is showing fewer physical signs of stress.

More than 10 factors tracked by your Fitbit device make up your score. These factors are broken down into 3 categories:

  • Responsiveness: heart-rate data and electrodermal activity (EDA), if available, to assess if your body shows signs of stress.
  • Exertion balance: impact of physical activity on your stress level.
  • Sleep patterns: effect of sleep duration and quality on your stress level.

To see a detailed breakdown of your score in the Fitbit app, purchase a Fitbit Premium subscription. For more information, see What should I know about Fitbit Premium?

ClosedWhat’s my responsiveness score in the Fitbit app?

When you're stressed, your autonomic nervous system releases hormones to prepare you for a “fight or flight” response, which can affect your skin sweat levels, your heart rate, and other heart activity.

You receive a higher score when your body shows fewer signs of this responsive activity.

ClosedWhat’s my exertion balance score in the Fitbit app?

The right amount of physical activity can help you better react to stress. This score is determined by recent activity, including steps, exercise, and level of fatigue.

You receive a higher score when you balance the benefits of exercise with the physical stress it can cause on your body. Either too much exercise or too little exercise can impact your score.

ClosedWhat’s my sleep patterns score in the Fitbit app?

Poor sleep can negatively affect your ability to deal with stress, while a high level of stress can make it harder to fall asleep. This score is determined by the amount and quality of sleep you get.

You receive a higher score when your sleep patterns indicate a low level of physical stress.

ClosedHow can I improve my stress management score?

Try to identify the stressors in your life and determine strategies to manage them. Some tips to manage stress include:

  • Get regular exercise to help boost your mood and improve your health.
  • Set a consistent bedtime and try to sleep for at least 7 hours a night.
  • Try a relaxing activity such as meditation, mindfulness, or breathing exercises.
  • Set goals and priorities to determine what must be done immediately and what can wait (source).

The Fitbit app has tools to help you manage stress, including mood logging to reflect on how you feel, and content related to mindfulness, sleep, activity, and nutrition. Unlock additional content and tips in the app with a Fitbit Premium subscription. For more information, see What should I know about Fitbit Premium?

EDA Scan app (Fitbit Charge 5 and Fitbit Sense Only)

Enjoy a quiet moment or a longer mindfulness session and see your body’s response.

ClosedWhat’s an EDA response?

Electrodermal activity (EDA) responses are tiny changes in the sweat level of your skin. These changes may be due to stress or other factors such as movement, noise, or temperature variations. For example, you might notice that your hands feel sweaty before you speak in front of a group of people.

While your EDA response may vary, you should typically expect fewer EDA responses the calmer you are.

ClosedHow does my Fitbit device measure my EDA response?

The electrodes on your device can detect tiny changes in the sweat level on your skin (which changes your skin conductance). Because your sweat level is controlled by the sympathetic nervous system, these changes can indicate meaningful trends about your body’s response to stress. Your device detects EDA responses on your palm or fingertips because there's a high density of sweat glands located there versus in other parts of the body.

ClosedSense

Sense detects your EDA responses from your palm through electrodes on the top of the device.

ClosedCharge 5

Charge 5 detects your EDA responses from your fingertips, through electrodes on the sides of the device.

ClosedHow do I start an EDA scan on my Fitbit device?
ClosedCharge 5
  1. On your tracker, swipe left or right to the EDA Scan app and tap to open it.
  2. To begin a scan the same length as your previous scan, tap the play icon. To change the length of time for the scan, swipe up and tap Edit lengththentap your desired number of minutes.
  3. Gently hold the sides of your device with your thumb and index finger.
  4. Remain still and keep your fingers on your device until the scan is complete.
  5. If you remove your fingers, the scan pauses. To resume, place your fingers back on the sides of your device. To end the session, tap End session.
  6. When the scan is complete, tap a mood to reflect on how you feel, or tap Skip.
  7. Swipe up to see the summary of your scan, including your number of EDA responses, heart rate at the start and end of the session, and reflection if you logged a reflection.
  8. Tap Done to close the summary screen.
  9. To see more details about your session, open the Fitbit app on your phone. From the Today tab Fitbit logo, tap the Mindfulness tilethen  Your Journey.

Someone holding the tracker with their thumb and finger on either side

ClosedSense
  1. On Fitbit Sense, tap the EDA Scan app .
  2. Tap Quick Scan for a 2-minute scan or Guided Session for a scan lasting up to 60 minutes.
  3. If you chose Guided Session, start a meditation session in the Fitbit app. For instructions, see the steps above.
  4. Place your hand on top of the screen. Note that your palm must touch all 4 sides of the metal frame.
    A person's palm on the face of their watch
  5. Remain still during the scan. For best results, keep your hand on the watch for the full duration of the scan.
  6. If you remove your hand, the scan pauses. To resume, place your hand back on the screen.
  7. If you chose Quick Scan, Sense vibrates after the scan is complete. Remove your hand, and tap Log It to record your reflection, or tap Skip. Then swipe up to see a summary of your scan.
  8. If you chose Guided Session, remove your hand and tap End to complete the scan.
  9. To see details about your scan or session, tap the Mindfulness tile in the Fitbit app thenYour Journey.
ClosedWhy didn’t the EDA scan work?

If you received an error, try these tips:

  • If your device can’t detect your EDA response:
    • Charge 5—keep your fingers on the sides of your tracker for at least 90 seconds and remain still to get a reading.
    • Sense—keep your hand over the watch face for at least 90 seconds and remain still to get a reading.
  • If your device can’t detect your heart rate, try tightening your band. The band should be snug but not constricting. If you experience any discomfort, loosen the band, and if it persists give your wrist a break by taking it off.

Thanks for your feedback.

2077

Sours: https://help.fitbit.com/articles/en_US/Help_article/2077.htm

Tracking fitbit stress versa 2

Fitbit has the worst luck. In the spring of 2020, it released an affordable, outdoorsy fitness trackerjust as the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic forced many people to stay home. Late in the year it released the Sense, which has a new stress-management tool to help cope with—in my case—said pandemic, racial injustice, life-threatening wildfires and toxic smoke, and the disaster that is remote schooling.

I took the Sense’s stress test in a hotel room on the Oregon coast, where my family and I fled to briefly escape Portland’s hazardous air quality. I got a Stress Management score of 93. I found that to be remarkable, considering I was extremely stressed, not sleeping, panic-spiraling over my kids’ blackening lungs, had been trapped in my house for more than a week, and had eaten only French fries for the past three days.

A good fitness tracker doesn’t just have sensitive sensors that collect tons of data. It also displays that data in an easily digestible way and provides simple, actionable advice. While the Sense does measure new biometrics, like measuring your blood oxygen and taking your stress levels through electrodermal activity (EDA), I’m not sure it actually helps you.

Too Much Trouble

The Sense is a good-looking fitness tracker. The square face has gently curved corners, no inscribed "Fitbit" at the bottom, and a glowing AMOLED screen that shows images in well-lit, striking detail. As is the case with all of Fitbit’s trackers, it also comes with a staggering variety of accessories. I like the sports wristbands, but with the Sense I opted for the woven coral (which I would not recommend, as it showed dirt within a few days).

Fitbit also has a variety of proprietary faces and a bunch of well-designed, and less well-designed, user ones. Previously, you had to load a specific SpO2 face to check your blood oxygen readings, and only while you were sleeping. But Fitbit has since enabled sleep blood oxygen tracking on the backend, meaning you now don't need a specific clock face to track your blood oxygen. Congratulations, you get to keep your Memoji on your watch face instead! (I'm kidding. Take that Memoji off right now.)

The company also added new SpO2-specific faces to the app gallery, in case you want to keep checking your blood oxygen minute to minute.

The SpO2 face has a scale that lets you see at a glance whether you're getting enough oxygen while you sleep. Over a week, I never got a score below 94 percent, which both I and the Sense registered as "fine." It’s difficult to take an SpO2 measurement while you’re asleep, but I did cross-check with a fingertip pulse oximeter to verify that the Sense’s HR and SpO2 measurements were reasonably accurate, which they were.

Every other day or so, the Sense had trouble taking my SpO2 measurements, and even on days when it worked, it sometimes took several hours (on a Garmin, it takes minutes). Fitbit's representatives told me the Sense was tested across a wide range of skin tones, but optical sensors do have a history of malfunctioning with people who are not white.

The Best at Stress

The Sense’s other new biometrics are stress measurements. Fitbit claims that electrodermal activity, or EDA, as measured by electrical pulses in your sweat, is a reliable indicator of stress. You measure your EDA by tapping to take an EDA scan and placing your palm over the metal bezel. The Sense will measure how many EDA responses you get in the span of two minutes.

There’s long-standing research to back this up. Skin conductivity has long been used in polygraph tests to measure arousal, along with heart rate and respiration. The Sense combines this EDA scan with nine other inputs, including activity and sleep quality, to give you a Stress Management score of 0 to 100. The higher the score, the better prepared you are to handle stress.

This seems like a very similar metric to the Oura Ring’s Readiness score or Garmin’s Body Battery, only you have to tap farther into the Fitbit app and into the Stress tile to get to it. And while EDA seems like a good way of measuring flight response while, say, watching Hereditary, it doesn’t seem to be great at gauging the long-term stress of living under multiple constant threats.

Unfortunately, I got to test how the Sense measured stress firsthand. Some days—for example, the day that some of our friends had to evacuate due to wildfires, I had a go-bag packed by the door as smoke crept into every crevice of our home, and several friends’ houses burned to cinders—I had 16 EDA responses, versus my normal one to 5.

But what about it? The Sense didn't have any useful tips except telling me to breathe, which was ironic given that our air quality was so bad. Even on days when my head was about to explode, my Stress Management score stayed over 90. Today, a normal day, my Stress Management score is 74 because I had a hard workout yesterday. The score seems only marginally related to stress or my ability to manage it. The only useful piece of actionable advice I got was seeing that my heart rate lowered by about 10 beats per minute every time I sat quietly through a two-minute scan. But you don't need a watch to tell you to sit down and close your eyes every now and again.

Data for All

The truth is, these new biometrics might not be made for you at all. Many public and private institutions are currently vying for your wearable data in the race to predict Covid-19 before an outbreak starts. It’s not hard to imagine that researchers will soon be clamoring for your blood oxygen and EDA responses.

If you can help others, that might make the Sense worth it for some people, but right now, the Sense seems like an overreach, especially if you find the SpO2 readings to be unreliable, like me.

Many of my favorite features, like Sleep Tracking and Fitbit Coach, also remain locked under Fitbit Premium. A Premium subscription costs $80 every year. Add in the $330 Sense hardware, and you've spent as much as an Apple Watch Series 6 costs. At that price, you should probably just get an Apple Watch (if you own an iPhone).

Updated January 2021: We've mentioned new features Fitbit added in a software update that rolled out in November 2020.

Sours: https://www.wired.com/review/fitbit-sense-watch/
Fitbit Sense, Versa 3 \u0026 2 - Now has SpO2!

This morning, Fitbit released its latest fitness-tracking wearable, the Fitbit Charge 5. It's equipped with a host of health-related features and new premium content.

Dubbed its most advanced health-and-fitness tracker to date, the Charge 5 has tools for monitoring real-time activity, stress levels, heart health and sleep – all with a design that’s 10% slimmer and 200% brighter than its predecessor, the Charge 4.

The device’s standout feature is Fitbit Premium’s new Daily Readiness Score that takes into account users’ health metrics to guide them towards a workout geared to their body’s needs or to a day of rest. The new feature will soon be available in the Fitbit app for premium members with the Charge 5, as well as the Sense, Versa 3, Versa 2, Luxe and Inspire 2 devices.

Fitbit included many of the health-monitoring capabilities available in its other devices in the Charge 5, including measurements for heart rate, ECG, breathing rate, skin temperature variation, SpO2, sleep quality and VO2 Max. It provides recommendations for Active Zone Minutes, has a built-in GPS and comes with an EDA sensor used to give stress management scores.

All of these measurements and more can be viewed in the Health Metrics dashboard in the Fitbit app to help track progress over time.

Like its other wearables, when someone purchases the Charge 5, they will get six months of Fitbit Premium for free. Users get access to more than 500 workouts, mindfulness and nutrition sessions from brands like Daily Burn, barre3 and obé, as well as content from newly announced partnerships with Calm and LES MILLS.

The Charge 5 is available today for preorder and costs $179.95. It will launch with worldwide availability in the fall.

WHY THIS MATTERS

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, fitness wearables were becoming a popular health tool for consumers, with roughly one in five U.S. adults saying they regularly wear a smartwatch or fitness tracker, according to a Pew Research Center survey from 2019.

But as the pandemic increased consumers’ awareness of their health, more people began adopting health-monitoring devices like fitness trackers and smartwatches. In fact, the fitness-tracker market grew by 19.5% in 2020, according to an article in Fortune Business Insights.

It predicts that the market will continue growing in the coming years, going from $36.34 billion in 2020 to $114.36 billion in 2028.

THE LARGER TREND

Fitbit is no stranger to product launches. It has already released several devices so far this year, including the Luxe, a stylized fitness tracker, and the Ace 3, a wearable for kids. The company also began offering blood-glucose tracking on its connected app.

Fitbit might also begin straying away from its traditional smartwatch form. A recent patent registration reveals it's working on a smart ring.

Other heavy hitters in the wearable space include Apple, Garmin and Samsung.

Sours: https://www.mobihealthnews.com/news/fitbit-launches-newest-wearable-stress-management-features

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Fitbit expands Stress Score tool to more fitness trackers, smartwatches including Versa 3

During its launch of the new Luxe tracker, Fitbit is also expanding a popular tool to more of its smartwatches and trackers. Starting this week, Fitbit is bringing Stress Management and Stress Score tools to more devices.

The ability to track your stress and generate a Stress Score launched first on last year’s Fitbit Sense smartwatch and will also be available on the Fitbit Luxe when it launches this spring. If you don’t want to invest in new hardware, though, the functionality is also being backported to the rest of the company’s portfolio.

Specifically, Fitbit is opening up the Stress Score to a few devices that have a heart rate sensor and are still for sale. The full list includes:

  • Fitbit Versa 3
  • Fitbit Inspire 2
  • Fitbit Charge 4
  • Fitbit Versa 2

When this feature arrives on older Fitbit devices, it’ll show up as a new tile on the Fitbit dashboard. The data is gathered using factors such as heart rate variability, sleep data, and exertion levels, too. Those all combine to create your daily Stress Score without requiring the EDA sensor that’s found in the Sense. If you don’t have Fitbit Premium you’ll only be able to see that score, but with the monthly subscription, you’ll also see more details on what contributed to your stress level.

Fitbit says this expansion will bring Stress Score to “millions more users” around the world, something that’s important as one in two people are feeling the “effects of the pandemic on their mental health.”

Fitbit confirmed to 9to5Google that this feature is rolling out now.

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Sours: https://9to5google.com/2021/04/20/fitbit-stress-score-versa-3-charge-inspire/


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