The game of life 2007

The game of life 2007 DEFAULT

The Game of Life

Board game

For other uses, see The Game of Life (disambiguation).

The Game of Life 人生ゲーム DSCFjpg

Japanese-language version of the modern edition of The Game of Life

DesignersBill Markham
PublishersMilton Bradley Company and Winning Moves Games USA
Publication; 61&#;years ago&#;()
GenresBoard game
Players2 to 4 or 6
Setup time5 minutes (approx.)
Playing time1 hour (approx.)
Random chanceHigh (spinning a wheel, card-drawing, luck)
Age range8+
Skills requiredCounting, reading

The Game of Life, also known simply as Life, is a board game originally created in by Milton Bradley, as The Checkered Game of Life. The Game of Life was America's first popular parlour game.[1] The game simulates a person's travels through his or her life, from college to retirement, with jobs, marriage, and possible children along the way. Two to four or six players can participate in one game.[3] Variations of the game accommodate up to ten players.

The modern version was originally published years later, in It was created and co-designed by toy and game designer Reuben Klamer[4] and was "heartily endorsed" by Art Linkletter. It is now part of the permanent collection of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History and an inductee into the National Toy Hall of Fame.

History[edit]

The Checkered Game of Life board

The game was originally created in by Milton Bradley as The Checkered Game of Life, and was the first game created by Bradley, a successful lithographer. The game sold 45, copies by the end of its first year. Like many 19th-century games, such as The Mansion of Happiness by S. B. Ives[page&#;needed] in , it had a strong moral message.[5]

The game board resembled a modified checkerboard. The object was to land on "good" spaces and collect points. A player could gain 50 points by reaching "Happy Old Age" in the upper-right corner, opposite "Infancy" where one began. Instead of dice&#;&#; which were associated with gambling&#;&#; players used a six-sided top called a teetotum.

Modern game[edit]

In the modern version, the Game of Life, was introduced. A collaboration between Reuben Klamer and Bill Markham, it consists of a track which passes along, over, and through small mountains, buildings, and other features. A player travels along the track in a small plastic automobile, according to the spins of a small wheel on the board with spaces numbered one through ten. Each car has six holes into which pegs are added as the player "gets married" and "acquires children". Some "early modern" editions have eight cars. The modern game pegs or "people" are pink and blue to distinguish the genders. Each player starts the game with one peg that matches his/her gender.

There is also a bank which includes money in $5,, $10,, $20,, $50,, and $, bills; automobile, life, fire, and/or homeowners' insurance policies (depending on the version); $20, promissory notes and stock certificates. Other tangibles vary between versions of the game. $ bills were dropped in the s as were $1, bills in

Versions[edit]

s version[edit]

The Game of Life, copyrighted by the Milton Bradley Company in , had some differences from later versions. For example, once a player reached the "Day of Reckoning" space, he/she had to choose one of two options. The first was to continue along the road to "Millionaire Acres," if the player believed he/she had enough money to out-score all opponents. The second option was to try to become a "Millionaire Tycoon" by betting everything on one number and spinning the wheel. The player immediately won the game if the chosen number came up, or went to the "Poor Farm" and was eliminated if it did not. If no player became a Millionaire Tycoon, the one with the highest final total won the game. In addition, there were spaces that forced a player to go back; in the case a player landed on one of these, they were forced to take the shortest route and pay no attention to any penalties and rewards in doing so.

This version had Art Linkletter as the spokesman, included his likeness on the $, bills (with his name displayed on the bills as "Arthur Linkletter Esq.") and a rousing endorsement from Linkletter on the cover of the box. It was advertised as a "Milton Bradley th Anniversary Game" and as "A Full 3-D Action Game."

Winning Moves currently[when?] markets a classic s edition.

s/s versions[edit]

About halfway through the production of this version, many dollar values doubled. This description focuses on the later version with the larger dollar amounts. The late s version also replaced the convertibles from earlier versions with minivans. Early s-era convertibles were still used in the edition. The "Poor Farm" was renamed "Bankrupt!" in which losing players would "Retire to the country and become a philosopher", and "Millionaire Acres" was shortened to "Millionaire!" in which the winner can "Retire in style". Like the s version, there were spaces that forced a player to go back; in the case a player landed on one of these, they were forced to take the shortest route and pay no attention to any penalties and rewards in doing so.

The gold "Revenge" squares added a byline, "Sue for damages", in the edition.[6]

version[edit]

The Game of Life was updated in to reward players for good behavior, such as recycling trash and helping the homeless, by awarding players "Life Tiles." The spaces that forced players to go back were removed, starting with this version.

The PC and Sony PlayStation video game adaptations of The Game of Life are based on this version. Players could play either the "classic" version, using the Life Tiles, or the "enhanced" version, where landing on a space with a Life Tile allow players to play one of several mini-games.

version[edit]

An updated version of the game was released in with a few gameplay changes. The new Game of Life reduced the element of chance, although it is still primarily based on chance and still rewards players for taking risks.

version[edit]

The version removed the lawsuit square which was replaced by a lawsuit card. A new "keep this card for k" feature was added as well.

version[edit]

The version includes pegs and squares for acquiring pets.

Other versions[edit]

Board games[edit]

Video games[edit]

Television show[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Game_of_Life
The Game of Life()

The Game of Life, also known simply as LIFE, is a board game originally created in by Milton Bradley, as The Checkered Game of Life. The game simulates a person's travels through his or her life, from high school graduation to retirement, with jobs, marriages and children (or not) along the way. Two to six players can participate in one game; however, variations of the game have been made to accommodate a maximum of eight or ten players. The modern version was originally published one hundred years later, in (then "endorsed" by Art Linkletter, with a circular picture of him on the box) by the Milton Bradley Company (now a subsidiary of Hasbro).

History[]

File:CheckeredGameofLife.jpg

The game was originally created in by Milton Bradley as The Checkered Game of Life. This was the first game created by Bradley, a successful lithographer, whose major product until that time was a portrait of Abraham Lincoln with a clean shaven face, which did not do very well once the subject grew his now-famous beard. The game sold 45, copies by the end of its first year. Like many games from the 19th century, such as the The Mansion of Happiness by S.B. Ives in , it had a strong moral message.[1]

Bradley's game did not include dice, but instead used a teetotum, a six sided top (dice were considered too similar to gambling).

The game board was essentially a modified checkerboard. The object was to land on the "good" spaces and collect points. A player could gain fifty points toward this goal by reaching "Happy Old Age" in the far corner, opposite "Infancy" where one began.

In , the one hundredth anniversary of the game, the form of the game now known as The Game of Life, was introduced, designed by Reuben Klamer. There were many re-publishings over the years, including , , , , , , , and

Setup[]

The game consists of a track, on which players travel by spinning a small wheel with spaces numbered 1 through 10, located in the middle of the board. The board also contains small mountains, buildings, and other similar pieces, making the playing area three-dimensional. Playing pieces (pawns) are small, colored plastic automobiles which come in six different colors (red, blue, white, yellow, orange, and green), and each pawn has six holes in the top in which the blue and pink "people pegs" are placed throughout the game as the player "gets married" and has or adopts "children". (Some "early modern" editions have eight automobiles.)

Each game also includes a setup for a bank, which includes play money (in denominations of $1,, $5,, $10,, $20,, $50,, and $,), insurance policies (automobile, life, fire, and/or homeowners' insurance depending on the version), $20, promissory notes, and stock certificates. Other tangibles vary with the game version.

s version[]

The Game of Life copyrighted by the Milton Bradley company in had some differences from later versions. For one, once a player reached the Day of Reckoning, he could end up at the "Poor Farm", or he could become a Millionaire Tycoon and move on to Millionaire Acres.

This version had Art Linkletter as the spokesman, included his picture on the $, bills, and a rousing endorsement from Linkletter on the cover of the box. It was advertised as a "Milton Bradley th Anniversary Game" and as "A Full 3-D Action Game!"

Salaries[]

knnlTo determine one's salary, a player could travel one of two routes at the beginning of the game. The shorter route was entitled Business and resulted in the player receiving a set salary of $5, per Pay Day. The longer route was entitled College and could earn the player anywhere between $6, and $20, per Pay Day. Both of these initial routes joined back together at the first pay day.

s/s version[]

About halfway through the production of this version, many dollar values doubled (possibly to reflect inflation). This description focuses on the later version with the larger dollar amounts. The late s version also replaced the familiar convertibles from earlier versions with Chrysler-esque minivans. (s era convertibles were still used in some early s sets.)

Salaries[]

To determine one's salary, a player could travel one of two routes at the beginning of the game. The shorter route was entitled Business and resulted in the player receiving a set salary of $12, per Pay Day. The longer route was entitled College and could earn the player anywhere between $16, and $50, for every Pay Day. Both of these initial routes joined back together at the first Pay Day.

"Share the Wealth" cards[]

Distributed with this game were a number of "Share the Wealth" cards. Each player started out with one, and earned another card if "Pay Day" was reached by exact count. There were three types: Collect, Pay, and Exemption, and they were used as follows:

  • If a player landed on a space where money was collected from the bank, or received a Pay Day, an opponent with a Collect card could steal half the collected money from that player.
  • If a player landed on a space in which money was paid to the bank, or had to pay Taxes, the player could present a Pay card to an opponent, who immediately had to pay half of the first player's penalty.
  • If a player had an Exemption Card, a Share the Wealth card levied was canceled; both cards were then removed from the game.

Life Events[]

Upon adding a member to the family (getting married, having children, etc.) the player "collected presents" from each of the other players. At marriage, this amount was determined by spinning the wheel: spinning 1, 2, or 3 was worth $2, per opponent; 4, 5, or 6 was worth $1,; 7 through 10 earned nothing. In the case of children, the player was awarded a flat $1,; if the player had twins or adopted two children, the amount was doubled. A house cost a flat $40,, and buying one was one of the red spaces (i.e. all players had to buy a house at the time they landed on or passed this space.)

Insurance and Stock[]

In this version, the three insurance policies (automobile, life, and fire) prevented the player from being affected by a number of "tragedy" spaces throughout the board (house fires, car wrecks, etc.) which cost the player a significant amount of money if landed on without being insured. Buying life insurance activated certain spaces which awarded dividends if landed on. Automobile and fire insurance could be lost permanently if the player landed on a "careless" or "reckless driver" space (at least one edition had the humorous misspelling "Wreckless driver".) Life insurance had the possibility of "maturing" with large financial gains if a person holding a policy landed on the corresponding space.

The Stock certificate played a much more important (and realistic) role in this version than in later versions. Purchasing a Stock certificate cost $50,; however, many of the high-payout spaces (such as "striking oil" with its $, payout) were only active if the player owned stock. In addition, a couple of white spaces allowed the player the opportunity to "play the market" if he or she desired, in a game similar to the Lucky Day space (explained below). If the bearer landed on a space indicating a rise in stock prices, the player collected money accordingly, and if they landed on a "stock prices drop" space, they likewise lost money.

Lucky Day[]

Several of the spaces were marked "Lucky Day"; if the player landed on a Lucky Day they immediately received $20, (paid with two $10, bills.) The player could keep the money or gamble it for the chance to turn it into $, To gamble, the player placed each of the $10, bills on one of the numbers printed on a large "number strip" provided with the game, and spun the wheel. If it landed on an empty number, the player lost the $20,; however, if it landed on a number with a $10, bill, the player was given $, Comparing the payout () to the odds of winning (), it was always advantageous to gamble here.

Retirement[]

When a player reached the end of the game they could retire to the "Millionaire" space if they thought they had the most money. In some circumstances, all players would retire here after reaching the end of the game, at which point they would count their money. The player with the most money won the game.

If a player was trailing near the end of the road they could make one final gamble in an attempt to become the "Millionaire Tycoon". The player selected one number on the number strip, and placed their car on it. Upon spinning the wheel, 9 of the 10 numbers forced the player to move to the "Bankrupt" space, losing the game. However, if the correct number was selected, the player became the Millionaire Tycoon and automatically won the game.

version[]

The Game of Life was updated in to reward players for "good" behavior, such as recycling trash and helping the homeless ("penalty" spaces in previous versions.) The version of the game proceeds as follows:

Careers and Salaries[]

There are still two routes at the beginning of the game, now labeled Career and College. Selecting the College route now places the player in debt from the very start; however, the probability of landing a better job and a higher salary is much better than selecting the Career route. If the person lands on a "trade a salary card" space, the player had the option of "trading up". At the shared end of both paths, the player's career and salary are decided by chance. A Career Card (with such occupations as a teacher, police officer, athlete, and travel agent), as well as a Salary Card (ranging in $10, increments from $20, to $,) are selected, as outlined below.

If a player chooses Career, the shorter path is taken. At its end, one occupation card and one salary card are chosen. If the selected Career card says "Degree Required", another Career Card must be drawn. The player continues the game with that specific career and salary unless another event affects the player.

If a player chooses College, two Promissory Notes must be taken from the bank for tuition, and the player must take the longer path (which in this version is also more "dangerous" than the Career path). However, at its end, three Career cards and three Salary cards are chosen, and the player may choose one from each set after looking at them.

Types of spaces[]

As in the s version, most of the spaces on the game board are orange, and their instructions are only followed if they are landed on. The "Pay Day" spaces are green and impact the player when landed on or passed over. Red spaces now always signify a major life event (e.g. graduation, marriage, buying a house, retirement), and must be stopped on even if the spin is greater than the number needed to land on them. The "decision" spaces are now blue, and if landed on, the player can choose to follow them or do nothing. "Taxes Due" is now a normal orange space, and is also only active if landed on.

Occupation spaces[]

Most of the spaces requiring the player to pay money to the bank have a symbol next to them, each of which corresponds to that on one of the career cards. If any opponent has that career card, the money is paid to that opponent instead of the bank. If the player himself has that career, no money is paid.

LIFE Tiles[]

A major change to the game in this version is the collection of "LIFE Tiles" as one progresses through the game. Every time a player lands on a space marked with the LIFE logo they collect a LIFE tile, (a small rectangular game piece with the "LIFE" logo on one side and an event on the other along with a sum of money collected from this accomplishment). (These also replace the previous "collecting presents" rule.) On each of these tiles is a major life event (e.g. climbing Mt. Everest, curing the common cold, building a better mousetrap, etc.). Each of these tiles bears an amount from $50, to $, The tiles are not revealed until all players have "retired", at which point they are flipped over and their total is added to the player's money total.

If at any time the draw pile of LIFE Tiles is depleted, a player may steal one from any active player remaining in the game, or certain "retired" players (see Retirement section below.)

Buying a house[]

One of the red spaces in the game is buying a house. At this point in the game, the player must immediately draw one House Deed and pay to the bank whatever that house costs (ranging from a $, Victorian mansion, to a $40, "split-level" shack.) From then on, homeowners' insurance may be purchased for a price listed on the house deed.

Insurance and Stock[]

In this version, there are two insurance policies (automobile and home owners') that prevent the player from being affected by a number of "tragedy" spaces throughout the board. Purchasing a Stock certificate still costs $50,, however its role is very limited in this series. Upon purchasing stock, the player chooses a stock card numbered between 1 and 9. From that point, any time any player spins that number, the stockholder collects $10, from the bank. A player may only hold one stock card at a time unless landing on a space marked "Stock Market Zooms", at which point a free stock card is chosen. Likewise, "Stock Market Slumps" costs the stockholder one stock card. Each number has only one stock and will not be available to others as they are being purchased.

Retirement[]

When a player reaches the end of the game, there are two options to "retire". One is to place their car at Millionaire Estates (largely unchanged from the previous version), or, may retire at Countryside Acres (previously the "Bankrupt" space). Each has its benefits and risks.

If a player thinks he or she will end the game with the most cash, the best option is to retire at Millionaire Estates. Four LIFE Tiles are placed here before the start of the game. After all players have finished the game, they count their cash on hand; whoever has the most cash receives these four tiles (in the rare occurrence of a tie, they are split). However, if other players are still playing the game and the LIFE Tile draw pile is empty, these players may still steal tiles from anyone retired at this space.

If a player is not confident in the amount of cash on hand, they may retire to Countryside Acres. By retiring here, they collect one LIFE tile, and no other players can steal tiles from him/her for the remainder of the game.

After all players have retired, the amounts on the LIFE Tiles are revealed, and whoever has the most money (cash on hand added to the combined total of one's LIFE Tiles + house value) is the winner.

CD-ROM version[]

In , a CD-ROM version of the game was produced by Hasbro which added computerized moves and short animations to the game. An option was also given for players to compete in games over the Internet.

Several features of the s version were also resurrected for this version of the game, such as "collecting presents" for marriage and kids (one spin at $2, times spin for marriage, one spin at $1, times spin for a child, two spins at $1, per spin for twins) and exacting "Revenge" on other players (If one landed on a Pay Day space, one would take an amount of money equal to one's salary from a player of one's choice. Players retired at Countryside Acres were presumably immune from being selected). Also the routine for retiring changed. Retired players still spun the wheel on their turn, this time to gain or lose money. The difference between Countryside Acres and Millionaire Estates is that the former only had one space in which the player could lose money, but the payouts were lower. The latter offered bigger payouts, but also had more numerous and severe penalty spaces, thus adding more risk to retiring here. This changed retiring strategy quite a bit, making come-from-behind victories possible if Millionaire Estate retirees' luck turned for the worse:

Number spunCountryside Acres Millionaire Estates
1-$5,-$25,
2$5, $25,
3$10, -$50,
4$15, $50,
5$20, -$75,
6$25, $75,
7$30, -$,
8$35, $,
9$40, -$,
10$45, $,

Life's Little Games[]

Different versions of the game were offered on the CD-ROM. The Classic game followed the rules of the current board game. An Enhanced Game was also offered which replaced the LIFE Tiles with "Life's Little Games" (simple arcade type games which offered the player a chance to win bonus money). In the Enhanced game, when a player landed on a space that would ordinarily award them a LIFE tile, they instead spun the wheel. Random items were assigned to each space, being either a cash amount or one of the games. One exception was spinning 10, which allowed the player to spin again and multiplied the player's winnings from whatever they landed on. The space started at Double, and the multiplier increased by one for each successive spin of The other exception was spinning 5, which was marked "Revenge" and gave the player another spin, but not before choosing one opponent from whom to take one's winnings from the game (or presumably give to, if the player finished with a negative score in Up or Down). Players retired at Countryside Acres are immune from being selected for revenge.

The values used in "Life's Little Games" were typically $5,, $10,, $25,, $50,, $75,, and $, Regardless of whether a player clicks DONE, exhausts all turns, or (in the case of Skunk Money) loses the accumulated winnings, all boxes are revealed before the next player spins.

Safe Crackers[]

The player has four tries to reveal as high an amount as possible. If satisfied that (s)he cannot achieve a higher amount with any remaining attempts, the player clicks DONE.

Up or Down[]

There is one of each denomination from $5, to $, There is also one of each denomination in the negative, which subtracts this amount from a player's potential gain (and is painted the complementary color). A player can choose as many spots as seen fit and stop at any time by clicking the DONE box.

Get a Life[]

All letters in the word L-I-F-E must be uncovered in six clicks or fewer. Every letter appears alone in three different spots on the grid, in the form and colors of the Life ident. If the word is revealed in four clicks, the player gains $, In five clicks, the gain is $75, In six, it is $50, During the course of this game, a corner display, again in the form of the LIFE ident, keeps track of the player's progress by indicating which letters have and have not yet been uncovered.

Treasure Chest[]

There are two of each denomination from $5, to $, The player has six tries to reveal two identical amounts. The game ends upon a match or exhausting all six turns.

Skunk Money[]

There are no $75, or $, spots on this board. One spot is worth $50,; two are worth $20,; six are worth $10, One spot reads DOUBLE YOUR WINNINGS and thus doubles the potential amount. The other two spots contain a skunk. If a skunk is uncovered, the game ends and no money is gained. A player can stop at any time by clicking the DONE box.

Cannonball[]

There are two of each denomination from $5, to $, Like Treasure Chest, the idea is to uncover two spots containing the same denomination. Unlike Treasure Chest, a player can achieve more than one match over the course of the game. In this take on the Memory Game, the player has four tries and therefore eight clicks to get as many matches as possible.

Crane Dump[]

Only included in the PC version, this game involved a player moving a crane left or right on top of a game board very similar to Plinko from The Price is Right. When the player was satisfied with the crane's position, they dropped the ball into the board, where it would land in a slot on the bottom. The slots were labeled with money amounts ranging from $10, to $, No more than one ball at a time could occupy a slot. If a second ball did land in a slot, both balls would be destroyed, leaving the slot empty. After six balls, the total winnings were tallied and awarded to the player. The player could also stop early by clicking the "stop" button.

Trash Can[]

Another PC exclusive, this game was essentially the converse of Crane Dump. It involved the player moving a white bucket between the slots of Crane Dump. When they were satisfied with the bucket's position, they dropped the ball from the crane above (the crane in this game was stationary) in hopes that it would land in the bucket. The player was allotted six balls; each ball that successfully landed in the bucket awarded the player $50,, making the maximum possible winnings $,

(40th anniversary) edition[]

Template:Expand

A 40th anniversary edition was released in The biggest change to this game was the replacement of the Travel Agent with a Computer Consultant, and changes to corresponding career spaces.

edition[]

An updated version of the game's format was released in with a few gameplay changes. The new Game of Life was more realistic and tried to add in extra elements to reduce chance, although it is still primarily chance based and still rewards players for taking risks.

Starting College[]

In the version one who started College would receive $40, in debt. The current version places such a player $, in debt. One still receives the same benefits for starting College as in the version.

Career Renovations[]

You can only get the lower salary cards for a starting wage. Special attributes were also added to the careers.

Jobs in Life[]

  • Doctor: Degree required. the doctor is the only person capable of getting the yellow salary card without luck/wasting tiles.
  • Computer Consultant: Any time the spinner stops between numbers or comes off the track, collect $50, to fix it.
  • Artist: Collect $10, from a player who buys your art (spins a 1).
  • Salesperson: Collect 5, when another player buys stock or insurance.
  • Athlete: You may trade in 4 life tiles to get the yellow salary card ($,).
  • Accountant: Degree required. the accountant collects taxes.
  • Teacher: You may draw a career card after all players have a job. You get the benefits but not an extra salary.
  • Entertainer: If two 8s, 9s, 10s, are spun in a row, replace your salary with the yellow salary card ($,) if necessary.
  • Police Officer: Collect $10, from any opponent who speeds (spins a 10).
  • all jobs have a circle label. if a person lands on a space with this label on it, all money goes to you.

Selling one's house[]

There is an addition of a new space where a player can sell his house. The sale price of one's house is determined by multiplying (or dividing) the original price of the house by an amount determined by spinning the wheel (similar to the enhanced game on the CD-ROM). If a low number is spun, the player loses profit, a mid-range number breaks even, and a high number nets a tremendous profit. If one sells his house in this manner, another house is bought, and the process is repeated (without option) at the end of the game.

LIFE tile reductions[]

In the version the LIFE tiles ranged in value from $50, to $, This often changed the outcome of the game as it made it possible for the poorest person in the game to win right at the end when they were redeemed. To alleviate this problem, the LIFE tiles have been reduced in value down to a range between $10, and $50,

Current Version[]

Yet another version of the game was released in with a few more gameplay changes. The primary change is that all of the jobs except the Police Officer lost their special abilities. Other changes include a return in Share the Wealth cards, the Lucky Spin and withdrawing insurance policies. There are many more stop spaces, with choices similar to Twists and Turns.

Jobs in Life[]

No Degree Required[]

  • Salesperson: Salary $20–50,; taxes $5,
  • Hair Stylist: Salary $30–60,; taxes $10,
  • Mechanic: Salary $30–60,; taxes $10,
  • Police Officer: Salary $40–70,; taxes $15,; collect $5, from anyone spinning a 10
  • Entertainer: Salary $50, (no max); taxes $20,
  • Athlete: Salary $60, (no max); taxes $25,

Degree Required[]

  • Teacher: Salary $40–70,; taxes $15,
  • Computer Designer: Salary $50–80,; taxes $20,
  • Accountant: Salary $70–,; taxes $30,
  • Veterinarian: Salary $80–,; taxes $35,
  • Lawyer: Salary $90, (no max); taxes $40,
  • Doctor: Salary $, (no max); taxes $45,

Retirement[]

  • In Retirement, you can not be sued or otherwise penalized. However, you may collect on your long-term Investment card.

Notes[]

  • The game was endorsed by Art Linkletter in the s. It is now part of the permanent collection of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. It spawned a book, The Game of Life: How to Succeed in Real Life No Matter Where You Land (Running Press), by Lou Harry.
  • The highest sum of money that a player can earn in the most current "Game of Life" is $3,,, and can only be achieved if the player lands on all of the spaces that give money and has the highest possible salary.
  • In the current version it is possible to become a grand parent without having had or adopted kids.
  • In the case of a stock card the player holding a stock receives pay anytime the number is spun. including spins for home resale value.

Criticism[]

  • Some critics have noted that luck plays too large a role in determining the winner of the game, with Life Cards, which are essentially random, being the prime determinant of the winner. Aspects of the game where a user has to make a decision, such as attending college or purchasing insurance, have a very small effect in the outcome.[2]

Other versions[]

  • Super Jinsei Game series
    • Super Jinsei GameSuper Famicom video game ()
    • Super Jinsei Game 2Super Famicom video game ()
    • Super Jinsei Game 3Super Famicom video game ()
  • The Game of Life in Monstropolis (Monsters, Inc.) ()
  • Sailor Moon Edition (Japan Only)
  • The Game of Life Card Game ()
  • Fame Edition (or Game of Life Junior/travel version) ()
  • Star Wars: A Jedi's Path ()
  • Pirates of the Caribbean ()
  • The Simpsons Edition ()
  • Bikini Bottom SpongeBob SquarePants Edition ()
  • Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest ()
  • The Game of Life/Yahtzee/PaydayGame Boy Advance game
  • Twists and Turns Edition ()
  • The Game of LifeWii game ()
  • Indiana Jones Edition (, Target exclusive)
  • Pokémon Edition (Japan only)
  • Spongebob Squarepants Edition ()
  • Family Guy Collectors Edition ()
  • The Game of LifeWiiWare game () (Japan Only)
  • The Wizard of Oz Edition ()
  • The Game of Life Classic EditioniPhone game ()

In Popular Culture[]

Template:In popular culture

  • The post apocalypticAnime series Desert Punk has a character who became rich by discovering and reprinting the Game of Life.
  • In the R.E.M. song "Man on the Moon", The Game of Life is mentioned along with other board games.
  • In the episode of the television show South Park entitled "The Death of Eric Cartman" during season 9 of the series, the children can be seen playing a game called "LIVING," which is an obvious cameo appearance of the game.
  • It appeared on an episodeTemplate:Which? of That '70s Show.
  • Adult Swim's Robot Chicken sketch, involving a blue and pink peg. As the segment goes on it gradually turns to dark humor.

References[]

External links[]

Sours: https://boardgamemanuals.fandom.com/wiki/The_Game_of_Life
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The Game of Life

Number of Players

2 to 6 players

Overview

The Game of Life, also known simply as&#;Life, is a&#;board game&#;originally created in by&#;Milton Bradley, as&#;The Checkered Game of Life.&#;The Game of Life&#;was America's first popular&#;parlor game.&#;The game simulates a person's travels through his or her life, from college to retirement, with jobs, marriage, and possible children along the way. Two to six players can participate in one game. Variations of the game accommodate eight to ten players.

The modern version was originally published years later, in It was created and co-designed by toy and game designer&#;Reuben Klamer and was "heartily endorsed" by&#;Art Linkletter. It is now part of the permanent collection of the&#;Smithsonian's&#;National Museum of American History&#;and an inductee into the&#;National Toy Hall of Fame. It later spawned a book,&#;The Game of Life: How to Succeed in Real Life No Matter Where You Land(Running Press), by&#;Lou Harry.

History

The game was originally created in by&#;Milton Bradley&#;as&#;The Checkered Game of Life. This was the first game created by Bradley, a successful lithographer, whose major product until that time was a portrait of&#;Abraham Lincoln&#;with a clean-shaven face, which did not do well once the subject grew his famous beard. The game sold 45, copies by the end of its first year. Like many games from the 19th century, such as&#;The Mansion of Happiness&#;byS. B. Ives&#;in , it had a strong&#;moral&#;message.

The-game-of-life.jpg

Bradley's game did not include&#;dice, instead using a&#;te totum, a six-sided&#;top. (Dice were considered too similar to&#;gambling.)

The game board was essentially a modified&#;checkerboard. The object was to land on the good spaces and collect points. A player could gain 50 points by reaching "Happy Old Age" in the upper-right corner, opposite "Infancy" where one began.

In , the th anniversary of&#;The Checkered Game of Life, the first modern version of&#;The Game of Life, a collaboration between&#;Reuben Klamer&#;and Bill Markham, was introduced. The game was re-published many times over the years, including , , , , , , and

Modern game

The modern game consists of a track on which players travel by spinning a small wheel (in the center of the board) with spaces numbered 1 through The board also contains small&#;mountains, buildings, and other&#;three-dimensional&#;objects. Playing pieces are small, colored, plastic&#;automobiles&#;which come in red, blue, white, yellow, orange, and green; each car has six holes in the top in which blue and/or pink "people pegs" are placed throughout the game as the player "gets married" and has or adopts "children". Some "early modern" editions have eight cars.

Each game also includes a setup for a&#;bank&#;which includes play money in denominations of $5,, $10,, $20,, $50,, and $, bills; automobile, life, fire, and/or homeowners' insurance&#;policies (depending on the version); $20,&#;promissory notes&#;and&#;stock&#;certificates. Other tangibles vary between versions of the game. $ bills were dropped in the s as were $1, bills in

How to Play

Before you start the game, make sure that each piece is attached to the board in the correct spot. Next, mix up the Life tiles and take four (don't look at them) and place them near Millionaire Estates. The rest of the tiles are for the draw pile. Separate the other cards into four piles: a Salary pile, House Deeds pile, Career pile and

The-Game-of-Life (1).jpg

Stocks pile. They go face down at any edge of the board. The same thing occurs with the Homeowner's Insurance Policies, Bank Loans and Automobile Insurance Policies.

Banker

Choose one player as the banker. The banker organizes the money, then gives each person $10, Now, each player chooses a car and a peg to place in the driver's seat.

Who Goes First?

Decide who goes first by spinning the wheel. The player with the highest number goes first. If there is a tie, the players with the highest number spin again.

Taking Your First Turn

On your very first turn, you must decide whether you want to begin a career or go to college.

Career

If you want to begin a career, put your car on the Career space and have another player hold the Career deck and spread them out so you can pick one. Some cards say Degree Required; if you pick one of these then you must pick again. After you get your career, have the player spread out the Salary Cards and pick one of those. You now have a career and a salary and should spin the wheel as you would on any other turn.

College

If you wish to go to college, place your car on the College space, then have the bank loan you $40, for college tuition. Spin and move your piece as you would on any other turn. After a few turns, you eventually land on the Job Search space. Stop here, whether you have moves left or not. Have a player spread out the Career Deck. Pick three random cards, look at them, and choose one of those cards as your Career. Now do the same thing with the Salary Card: pick three to choose from and select one to keep.

Regular Game Play

Game-of-life-board-game-boardxjpg

On each consecutive turn, you spin the wheel. Move ahead the indicated number of spaces. If that space is already taken by another player, move to the space just ahead of that player. Read the space and follow the instructions. When you have completed any tasks or directions, then your turn ends.

Stocks, Insurance and Loans

At the beginning of each regular turn you may also choose to buy stocks or insurance and take out loans from the bank. Once you have spun the wheel to take your turn, you no longer have the option to purchase these items.

Tile Colors

As you play the game you will also encounter different colors of tiles. Each tile color has a different meaning.

  • Green tiles are your Pay Days. When you pass or land on one of these (similar to&#;Monopoly), simply receive your salary.
  • Blue tiles mean you can follow the instructions on the space if you want to.
  • Orange tiles mean you have no choice but to follow the directions on the space.
  • Red spaces mean you have to stop on the space, even if you have moves left. Follow the instructions on the space and spin again. Each red space has unique instructions because it deals with Job Searching, Getting Married and Buying a House.

Other Spaces

Throughout the game board are other game spaces that require you to take specific actions.

  • Landing on a life tile space means you take one LIFE tile from the pile, unless there are none left, which means you take one from another player.
  • Career spaces match the career cards, so if another player lands on this space and someone has this card, the first player pays the second player. If you own the career card, then you pay nothing. If no one has this card, then the player who lands on it pays the bank.
  • The Buy a House space requires you to stop and purchase a home. Draw a card from the House Deeds pile and pay for the house you've chosen. You must pay the full amount, even if that requires you to take a loan from the bank.
  • Other spaces require you to get married or add children to your family. When you land on these, add pegs to your vehicle according to the instructions. You also get to take a LIFE tile on these spaces.

Retirement and Winning the Game

When you have reached the end of the game, you must choose whether to retire at Millionaire Estates or Countryside Acres. If you retire at Millionaire Estates, you have the chance to receive four additional LIFE tiles if you are the richest person to retire there. At the end of the game, all players repay their loans and add up their LIFE tiles and money. The player with the most money wins the game.

Playing by the Rules

Sometimes life doesn't work out the way you want it to and that's also true in the Game of Life. Even if you do not get the salary you want or end up with a car full of kids, you must continue to play by the rules. If you try to cheat your way to success in the game, just as in real life, you will find that you will probably fall before you reach the top.

Let's_Quickly_Play_The_Game_of_Life_()

Revisions and Expansions

s version

The Game of Life, copyrighted by the Milton Bradley Company in , had some differences from later versions. For example, once a player reached the Day of Reckoning, they had to choose between moving on to Millionaire Acres (if they had a lot of money), or trying to become a Millionaire Tycoon (if they had little or no money) with the risk of being sent to the "Poor Farm".

This version had&#;Art Linkletter&#;as the spokesman, included his likeness on the $, bills (with his name displayed on the bills as "Arthur Linkletter&#;Esq.") and a rousing endorsement from Linkletter on the cover of the box. It was advertised as a "Milton Bradley th Anniversary Game" and as "A Full 3-D Action Game."

Winning Moves&#;currently markets a classic 's edition.

s/s versions

About halfway through the production of this version, many dollar values doubled. This description focuses on the later version with the larger&#;dollar&#;amounts. The late s version also replaced the convertibles from earlier versions with minivans. Early s-era convertibles were still used in the edition.

The "Revenge" squares were renamed "Sue for damages" in the edition.

version

The Game of Life&#;was updated in to reward players for good behavior, such as recycling trash and helping the homeless.

version

An updated version of the game was released in with a few gameplay changes. The new&#;Game of Life&#;reduced the element of&#;chance, although it is still primarily based on chance and still rewards players for taking risks.

Other versions

  • Super Jinsei Game series
    • Super Jinsei Game&#;Super Famicom&#;video game ()
    • Super Jinsei Game 2&#;Super Famicom&#;video game ()
    • Super Jinsei Game 3&#;Super Famicom&#;video game ()
  • The Game of Life in Monstropolis&#;(Monsters, Inc.) ()
  • Sailor Moon&#;Edition&#;(Japan Only)
  • The Game of Life Card Game&#;()
  • Fame Edition&#;(or&#;Game of Life Junior/travel version) ()
  • Star Wars: A&#;Jedi's Path&#;()
  • Pirates of the Caribbean&#;()
  • The Simpsons&#;Edition&#;()
  • Bikini Bottom&#;SpongeBob SquarePants&#;Edition&#;()
  • Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest&#;()
  • The Game of Life/Yahtzee/Payday&#;Game Boy Advance&#;game
  • Twists and Turns&#;Edition&#;()
  • The Game of Life Express&#;()
  • Monsters, Inc.&#;version
  • The Game of Life&#;Wii&#;game ()
  • Indiana Jones&#;Edition&#;(, Target exclusive)
  • Pokémon&#;Edition&#;(Japan only)
  • SpongeBob SquarePants&#;Edition&#;()
  • Family Guy&#;Collectors Edition&#;()
  • The Game of Life&#;WiiWare&#;game () (Japan Only)
  • The Wizard of Oz&#;Edition&#;()
  • The Game of Life - Haunted Mansion Theme Park Edition&#;()
  • The Game of Life Classic Edition&#;iPhone&#;game ()
  • Hasbro Family Game Night 3&#;for&#;Xbox ,&#;Wii, and&#;PlayStation 3&#;video game platforms, and was also later released as part of the Hasbro Family Game Night Fun Pack, which consisted as a compilation of both&#;Hasbro Family Game Night 2&#;and&#;Hasbro Family Game Night 3.
  • Rite Aid Pharmacy, The Game of Life Collect and Win&#;game ()
  • The Game of Life High School Edition&#;(aka "Pink Edition")
  • LIFE: Rock Star Edition
  • Game Show Edition&#;on&#;The Hub&#;()
  • The Game of LIFE: It's a Dog's Life Edition&#;()
  • LIFE: My Little Pony Edition (Announced for release late )&#;
  • The Game of Life: Edition&#;for&#;iOS&#;and&#;Android&#;by&#;Marmalade Game Studio&#;()&#;

Links and References

Official Rules

BoardGameGeek Review

Sours: https://board-games-galore.fandom.com/wiki/The_Game_of_Life
History of The Game Of Life

Components

  • Gameboard
  • 6 Plastic Car Pawns
  • Pink and Blue "People" Pegs
  • 3 Mountains
  • 1 Bridge
  • 7 Buildings
  • Label Sheet
  • Spinner Base, Ring and Dial
  • Stack of Play Money, Bank Loans and Pay Raises
  • 25 LIFE Tiles
  • 24 Spin to Win Tokens
  • Deck of 54 Cards
  • Banker's Tray
  • Spin to Win Strip
  • Story Sheet
  • 5 Special Coins

Object of the Game

Travel the path of LIFE making decisions, building a family, earning money (and paying some out too), buying homes and collecting LIFE tiles.

Have the highest value at the end of the game and win.


Setup

Attach the Buildings, Mountains, Bridge and Spinner
  1. Buildings, Mountains & Bridge: Match the circled letters on the plastic buildings, mountains and bridge to the letters on the gameboard.

    Then insert each piece by first sliding the long tab through the slot and under the gameboard, then press down to secure the small tab into place.

  2. Spinner: Match the circled letter on the plastic spinner to the letter on the gameboard.

    Then insert the 3 posts on the spinner base into the 3 holes in the gameboard. NOTE: The spinner can be removed at any time and passed around for easier play.


Game Elements

Life Tiles

Each LIFE tile carries a dollar amount that counts toward your total cash value at the end of the game.

Place the LIFE tiles value-side down on the table and mix them up. Then randomly draw three tiles and stack them LIFE-side-up at Millionaire Estates. Place the remaining tiles near the edge of the gameboard to form a draw pile.


Spin to Win Tokens

Place all of the Spin to Win tokens in a pile near the edge of the gameboard.


Spin to Win Strip

Place the multi-color Spin to Win strip along any edge of the gameboard.


Cards

Separate the cards into six decks (according to the card backs): College Career cards, Career cards, Starter Home Deeds, House Deeds, Share the Wealth cards, and Long-Term Investments.

Shuffle each deck separately and then place them facedown in piles near the gameboard.

Now deal three Share the Wealth cards to each player.


Long-term Investments

At the beginning of any of your turns you may buy one Long-Term Investment card. Pay the banker $10, and take any Long-Term Investment card from the deck.

It's your choice which one you pick. From now on, whenever any player (including you) spins the number on your Long-Term Investment card, you collect $5, from the bank!

You can only have one Long-Term Investment at a time.


Money, Bank Loans and Pay Raises

Choose one player to be the banker. This player is in charge of all money paid to and from the bank as well as issuing bank loans and handing out pay raises.



The banker separates the Bank Loans, Pay Raises and money by denomination and places each into the slots in the Banker's Tray.

The banker then gives each player $10,


Cars and Pegs

Carefully twist the pink and blue pegs off their plastic runners. Discard the runners. Put the pegs in a pile near the edge of the gameboard.

Choose a car and fit a people peg into the driver's seat (don't forget to buckle up!). All players do the same. Place any extra cars back in the box.



Game Play

All players spin the spinner. The player with the highest spin takes the first turn. Play then continues clockwise.

On your turn, spin the spinner. (If the spinner arm stops between numbers, spin again). Then move your car the number of spaces spun.

Always move your car forward, in the direction of the arrows. (Just like in real life, you can't go back in time!) If you land on an occupied space, move ahead to the next open space. Now, follow the space directions. This ends your turn. Your first turn is an exception.

On your first turn, decide to either Start a Career or to Start College. College offers more career and salary options, but it takes time - and it puts you in debt!


Start a Career

If you decide to start a career, place your car on the START CAREER space, then do the folIowing:

Draw a Career Card: Have another player fan out the Career card deck facedown, while you randomly draw one card. The card will list your career, salary, salary maximum and taxes due.


Note: You may not choose a College Career card. These are reserved for college graduates only.

Place your Career card faceup in front of you. Now spin the spinner and move as you would on a regular turn.



Start College

If you decide to go to college, place your car on the START COLLEGE space. Borrow $, from the bank for tuition (see BANK LOANS).

Now spin and move as you would on a regular turn.



Job Search

When you reach the JOB SEARCH space, stop -- even if you have moves left. Then do the following:

Choose Your Career Card: Have another player fan out the Career Card deck facedown, while you draw 3 cards at random. Look at the cards, choose any 1 card, then return the other 2 cards to the deck. See the Career Guidance section, below.

Choose Your salary Card: Now choose your Salary Card the same way (pick 1 card from the 3 cards you draw).

Place your Career Card and your Salary Card faceup in front of you. Now spin and move again.


The Spaces


Space Colors

As you move your car, notice the space colors - they're important!


Gold Spaces

Most spaces are gold. Whenever you land on a gold space, you must follow the directions.

Collect/pay Spaces

Collect from or pay to the bank the amount of money indicated on the space.


Life Spaces

These spaces show pictures of LIFE tiles, and are all about family activities, community service and good deeds! Whenever you land on a LIFE space, take one LIFE tile from the draw pile.

If the draw pile runs out, take one LIFE tile from any opponent. Do not look at the value side of the LIFE tile, just place it LIFE-side-up in front of you.


Taxes Due

Pay the bank the amount of taxes shown on your Career/College Career card.


Tax Refund

Collect from the bank the amount of taxes shown on your Career/College Career card.


Lose your Job

Land here and you MUST trade in your Career/College Career card for a new one. Have another player fan out the Career card deck facedown.

Randomly draw one card.



Important: When you lose your job, you also lose all of your pay raises and you must choose your new career from the Career card deck, NOT the College Career card deck regardless if you went to college or not.


Babies and Twins

Whenever you land on a Baby Boy or Baby Girl space, add one "people" peg to your car, collect a $5, baby gift from each of the other players and take one LIFE token from the draw pile.

If you land on a Twins space, add two "people" pegs to your car, collect a $5, gift from each of the other players and take one LIFE tile from the draw pile.


Spin to Win

Land on one of these spaces and all players get a chance to Spin to Win. Play any Spin to Win cards to increase your chances.

Take one Spin to Win token from the draw pile (matching the color of your car) and place it on any number on the Spin to Win strip.

Then pay your investment (up to $50,) to the bank. Now spin the spinner.

  • If the number spun matches the number you chose, the bank pays you 10 times the amount you invested.

  • If the number spun does not match the number you chose, you lose your investment. Place the token back in the draw pile.


Green Spaces

Pay Day

Whenever you land on or pass over a green PAY DAY space, collect your salary from the bank.


Pay Day - Pay Raise

Some PAY DAY spaces have Pay Raises attached to them.

When you land on or pass over a PAY DAY space with a Pay Raise on it, take a Pay Raise from the bank and place it near your Career card.

Then add that $10, to your current salary. If your salary is already at its maximum, just collect your current maximum salary and ignore this raise.




Orange Spaces

Whenever you reach an orange space, STOP! - even if you have moves left. Follow the directions, then, spin and move again. Most orange spaces represent important LIFE choices that you will have to make.


College Career Choice

Choose your College Career card: Have another player fan out the College Career cards facedown, then randomly draw two cards. Look at the cards and choose one.

The card will list your career, salary, salary maximum and taxes due. Place the card you chose faceup in front of you and return the other card to the deck.


Buy a Starter Home

Take a look at all the available Starter Home cards. Decide which one you want to buy and pay the bank the price on the card. If you're short on cash, you MUST borrow from the bank.


Return to School

Before you spin, choose to return to school or continue on the path of life. If you choose to return to school, pay $50, to the bank.


Change Career

You may choose to change your Career card for a College Career card or you may take a $20, salary increase.

  • If you choose to take a new College Career card, have another player fan out the College Career cards facedown and randomly draw two cards. Choose either card for your new career; or choose neither and keep your current Career card. Return the cards you didn't choose to the deck.

  • If you choose the salary increase, take two Pay Raises from the bank and place them near your Career card.


Family Path

Before you spin, choose either to take the family path and increase your chances of having children, or to continue on the path of life.


Buy a "better" House

Decide if you want to sell your Starter House and buy a better one. If so, look at the House cards and choose the house you want to buy.

If you decide to buy a better one, sell your Starter House back to the bank for the selling price listed on its card, then pay the bank the price on the new card. If you're short on cash, borrow from the bank.

Note: You can never own two houses at the same time. If you already own a house, you must sell it before you can buy a new one.


Risky Path

Before you spin, decide if you want to take the Risky path, which contains many Spin to Win opportunities, or the Safe path, and spend time with your family.


Get Married

Add one "people" peg to your car and take a LIFE tile. Then spin for your wedding gifts.

If you spin a 10, 9 or 8, the other players must each give you $10, If you spin a 7, 6 or 5, the other players must each give you $5, If you spin a 4, 3, 2 or 1, you receive nothing.

Note: If you can't afford to give a wedding gift, you MUST borrow from the bank.


Blue Lawsuit Spaces

Whenever you land on a blue Lawsuit space, collect $, from the player of your choice.


Bank Loans

You may borrow money from the bank during any of your turns. Take one or more bank loans (each loan is worth $20,). The banker gives you the matching amount from the bank.

Repay all loans to the bank with $5, interest (that means you must repay $25, for each bank loan). You may pay these off at any time during the game or wait until you retire at the end of the game.


Share the Wealth Cards

There are five kinds of Share the Wealth cards. If you have any, keep them facedown so only you will know what they are. Use these cards when you choose, but use them wisely. Here's what they can do


Highway Patrol

Any opponent caught speeding (spinning"10") must pay the Police Officer $5,! It's up to the Police Officer to notice when a player spins a "10". If you don't notice, the "speeder" gets away and pays no fine.

Note: If there's no Police Officer in the game, there's no fine for spinning "10".



Collect Card: Give these cards to your opponents when they land on gold COLLECT spaces. Now they have to give YOU half of the money they collected. After you play the card, discard it to the bottom of the deck.

Pay Card: Give these cards to your opponents when YOU land on a gold PAY space. Your opponent must now pay the bank half of what you owe for the space. After you play the card, discard it to the bottom of the deck.

Important: If you can't split an amount equally, the person who played the card always collects/pays the lower amount.

You cannot use COLLECT or PAY cards to split amounts of $5, or less.


Exemption Card: These cards allow you to ignore COLLECT or PAY cards when an opponent gives you one, as well as LAWSUITS. Just show this card to your opponent, then discard it along with your opponent's card to the bottom of the deck.

Note: Only one card may be given to an opponent in a turn. If two or more players wish to give an opponent a card, each of you must spin the spinner.

If you spin the highest number, only you give your opponent a card.


Spin To Win (2): These cards allow you to use two Spin to Win tokens instead of one when someone lands on a Spin to Win space. Take two tokens (matching the color of your car) from the draw pile and place them on any two numbers on the Spin to Win strip. Give your investment to the bank.

Now, spin the spinner. If the number spun matches one of your numbers, the bank pays you 10 times the amount you invested. If the number does not match, you lose your investment. Return the two tokens to the pile and discard the card to the bottom of the deck.


Spin To Win (4): These cards allow you to use four Spin to Win tokens instead of one when someone lands on a Spin to Win space. Take four tokens (matching the color of your car) from the draw pile and place them on any four numbers on the Spin to Win strip. Give your investment to the bank.

Now, spin the spinner. If the number spun matches one of your numbers, the bank pays you 10 times the amount of money you invested.

If the number does not match, you lose your investment. Return the four tokens to the pile and discard the card to the bottom of the deck.



Retirement

When you reach the end of the path of life, STOP! - even if you have moved left. Then do the following:

  • Repay to the bank any, and all, outstanding loans with interest.
  • Sell your house back to the bank for the amount listed on the card.
  • Place your Career card and Pay Raise(s) out of play.
  • Keep your Long-Term Investment card - you will still spin on your turn and can still collect whenever your number is spun!
  • Keep your Share the Wealth cards. These can still be played.
  • Collect a $10, retirement gift from each of your children by collecting the amount from the bank.
  • Choose to retire at Millionaire Estates or Countryside Acres (wherever you decide to retire, wait there until all other players have retired).

Retiring at Millionaire Estates



  • If you are the first player to retire at Millionaire Estates, take a look at the three LIFE tiles there, choose one and return the other two to the space.

    The second player to retire may choose from the remaining two LIFE tiles and the third player to retire will take the last LIFE tile. Any players arriving after that get no tiles for retiring at Millionaire Estates.

  • If you retire at Millionaire Estates, your LIFE tiles are NOT safe! If the draw pile runs out, players may take tiles from you when they land on LIFE spaces.


Retiring at Countryside Acres



You get no additional LIFE tiles for retiring at Countryside Acres, however, your LIFE tiles are safe!

If the draw pile runs out, players cannot take tiles from you when they land on LIFE spaces.


End of the Game

Once all players have retired, you add up your total value.

  1. Count your cash.
  2. Turn over your LIFE tiles money-side-up and add up the dollar amounts.
  3. Add the two figures together (cash value plus LIFE tile value).

The player with the highest total value wins!



Continue Reading

Sours: https://www.ultraboardgames.com/the-game-of-life/game-rules.php

2007 of the game life

Spread your pussy, or I'll miss, he demands, and loudly slaps on the bulging ass. Well they rape me, a thought flashed, but obediently I try to push my already wet pussy apart. Oops, Thierry deftly drove his cock, pulling me up to him, fingers gripping the elastic flesh of the ass.

History of The Game Of Life

Beautiful legs in seductive stockings and sandals looked at me. Having put myself in order a little, I decided to freshen up a little and go out to the balcony, but before that. I feel an emptiness in my ass, I inserted one of the largest anal plugs. I did not experience much discomfort, on the contrary, I felt more confident, put on transparent panties over it and went out onto the balcony.

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