Aluminum tooling plate vs 6061

Aluminum tooling plate vs 6061 DEFAULT

Contact US

INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Thanks. We have received your request and will respond promptly.

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!

  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

Join Us!

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Students Click Here

Eng-Tips Posting Policies

Contact US

Aluminum vs Jig Plate

Aluminum vs Jig Plate

dsjon10(Mechanical)

(OP)

I have a recent machining job where I had specified Aluminum type optional on the print.  The shop came back and asked if I could use jig plate aluminum.  What is jig plate aluminum and how does it differ from ?

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.


Resources

Low-Volume Rapid Injection Molding With 3D Printed Molds

Learn methods and guidelines for using stereolithography (SLA) 3D printed molds in the injection molding process to lower costs and lead time. Discover how this hybrid manufacturing process enables on-demand mold fabrication to quickly produce small batches of thermoplastic parts. Download Now

Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM)

Examine how the principles of DfAM upend many of the long-standing rules around manufacturability - allowing engineers and designers to place a part’s function at the center of their design considerations. Download Now

Industry Perspective: Education and Metal 3D Printing

Metal 3D printing has rapidly emerged as a key technology in modern design and manufacturing, so it’s critical educational institutions include it in their curricula to avoid leaving students at a disadvantage as they enter the workforce. Download Now

Taking Control of Engineering Documents

This ebook covers tips for creating and managing workflows, security best practices and protection of intellectual property, Cloud vs. on-premise software solutions, CAD file management, compliance, and more. Download Now

Sours: https://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=

What Is The Difference Between T Rolled Plate And Cast Tool &#; Jig Plate?

single

For manufacturers who frequently work with aluminum and other metals, being able to distinguish between and properly select the right materials for their specific tasks is of paramount importance. Not only is aluminum highly sought after because of the tremendous diversity of its alloys, but its amazing versatility allows for all kinds of shapes, sizes, and use cases. However, because of the complicated naming conventions and the wide variety of brand names, even experts can sometimes get confused regarding the different aluminum products available on the market.

This is especially true when comparing aluminum T rolled plate and cast tool & jig plate. Although they are different products, rolled T had a previous trade name of type tooling plate. This has led to a great deal of uncertainty and frequent purchasing mistakes, as many manufacturers confuse the term tooling plate and cast tooling plate.

However, they are two completely different products. Cast tooling plate, cast tool & jig plate, and CT & J all refer to cast aluminum products, which is not at all similar to rolled plate. The truth is that you need to be aware that there are many crucial differences between T rolled plate and cast tool and jig plate.

What Is Cast Tool And Jig Plate?

The term cast tool & jig plate, also referred to as CT & J, is a generic designation that includes several types of plate. For example, Clinton carries both Vista ATP-5 and Alpase KS cast plates. These are plates made from a modified aluminum alloy. There is little difference between these two plates, except for the flatness deviation, which only comes into play on thicknesses that are 5/8” or greater.

For all intents and purposes, it’s possible to lump the various CT&J plates together. Obviously, when it comes time for a purchasing decision, you will need to examine the differences closely to match your application’s requirements with the perfect grade, but broadly speaking, when comparing cast tooling plate to T, we can make a number of generalizations.

CT & J is a good option when stringent flatness tolerances and dimensional control are a consideration. CT&J plate like what we offer at Clinton Aluminum is made using a precise machined finish that has extremely tight thickness and flatness tolerances, especially when you are comparing it to rolled plate alloys like T CT & J also has excellent weldability, anodizing qualities, and corrosion resistance, while also being vacuum and pressure integrity guaranteed.

Industries, where you are likely to find CT & J in frequent use, include the automotive & aerospace industries, as well as in plastic molds including injection and blow molds, and assembly and machining jigs.

What About T Rolled Plate?

According to the Aluminum Association, flat-rolled products, such as sheet, plate, and foil account for the largest volume of aluminum bought in the United States by a wide margin. Rolled aluminum is more common than all other options, including castings, extrusions, wire, rod, bar, forgings, and more.

Aluminum sheet is amazingly versatile, and after being rolled it becomes suitable for a great number of finishing, fabrication, and joining processes. In general, it is rectangular in cross-section and is at least inches thick, with sheared or sawed edges. It can come either flat or coiled, with a wide variety of shapes and fabrications. Surface treatments can be added as desired.

In particular, Type Tooling Plate was the original trade name from Alcoa for what is now known as T rolled plate. This heat-treated alloy plate is harder and more machinable than many other aluminums. To achieve the T temper, the material must be solution heat-treated, stress relieved, and artificially aged. The metal then has to be stretched according to the desired wrought product.

T has many common uses, such as in watercraft, including sailboats and canoes, motor vehicle bodies, scaffolding, transmission towers, furniture, chemical equipment, marine applications, and hardware.

What is the comparison between CT & J and T?

A careful look at the respective properties of cast tool and jig plate and T rolled plate shows the following:

The thickness tolerance for CT & J is within inches, while for T it varies according to the thickness. The flatness deviation for CT & J is within inches from to inches. Above 5/8 of an inch, it is within inches. For T it is 3/16 of an inch for thicknesses between and 3 inches. From 3 to 8 inches, the deviation is 1/8 of an inch.

The typical yield strength for CT & J is 18 ksi, while for T it is 40 ksi. The typical tensile strength for the former is 41 ksi, and for the latter, it is 45 ksi. Their elongation in 2 inches is % and 12%, respectively. There are minimal differences between their densities, but CT & J has a Brinell hardness of 70, while for T it is The thermal conductivity is 81 btu/ft for the former, and btu/ft for the latter.

They each have excellent welding characteristics, but CT & J has better anodizing and machinability properties.

Summary

Choosing between the many options for aluminum alloys and grades can be tough. That’s why it’s important to consult with experts whose job it is to make sure you succeed. At Clinton Aluminum, our motto has always been the right material for the job. We do more than just sell products. We partner with our customers to ensure their long-term competitiveness.

Our service technicians take pride in helping our customers find the best alloy for any particular job. To learn more about the advantages and disadvantages of T, get in touch with one of our friendly and knowledgeable representatives today.

Resources: http://www.aluminum.org/sites/default/files/Rolling_Aluminum_From_The_Mine_Through_The_Mill.pdf

Sours: https://www.clintonaluminum.com/what-is-the-difference-betweentrolled-plate-and-cast-tool-jig-plate/
  1. Hard riddles to solve
  2. Monster truck clip art
  3. Boku no hero manga
  4. Rochester colonial windows and doors
  5. Solo backpack sprayer parts

Aluminum Guide

Mic 6 Cast Aluminum Plate

Mic6 Cast aluminum tooling plate offers superior dimensional stability and flatness compared to rolled plates. Being a cast product, it possesses very low internal stresses. Fully stress-relieved, Mic6 is a free cutting aluminum alloy with excellent machining characteristics, producing small, uniform chips in a variety of high speed operations. Considered a 7xxx series aluminum grade as Zinc is the main alloying element. Mic6 comes with both sides machined to a surface finish of 20 RMS or better and to a thickness tolerance of +/" with PVC protection on both sides. Fully weldable and corrosion resistant, Mic6 Cast Plate is a good alternative to Plate when strength can be sacrificed. Some applications include: tooling, base plates, jigs and fixtures, guages, rubber and plastic molds, printing machinery, templates, hydro press form blocks, index tables, electronics, routing tables, chip printers, vacuum chucks, automotive and aircraft tooling.

Mic6 is a registered trademark of Arconic.


Mechanical Properties
Tensile Strength25 ksi
Yield Point15 ksi
Elongation 2" %3
Hardness Brinell65
Sours: https://keymetals.com/aluminum_guide.html
6061 Aluminum Grade Guide - Metal Supermarkets

Cast Aluminum Tool & Jig Plate

Cast Aluminum Plate

Aluminum Cast Tool & Jig plate is vertical cast, stress-relieved, machined plate providing sound dimensional stability with minimal or no distortion even after extensive machining operations.

Cast Aluminum Plates/ Cast Tool & Jig Plate have a precision machined surface for superior flatness, flat within '', and +/- '' thickness tolerance, and are protected with PVC plastic on both sides. Cast Aluminum Plate typically has a surface finish of 25 RMS or better. ATP 5 has a tensile strength of 41KSI a Hardness of 70HB and a Yield Strength of 18 KSI.

Cast Tool & Jig Plate ATP 5 is typically stocked in '' x '', '' x '' and '' x '', domestically partnered with Vista Metals out of Fontana CA, our Vista Metals ATP-5™ cast aluminum plate can be produced in custom widths and lengths with a very short lead-time. ATP 5 has outstanding machinability and responds very well in today’s high speed cutting environments. ATP 5 is the preferred choice for engineers that require a dimensional stable product that has great strength to weight ratio. Vista Metals cast aluminum plate (ATP5) is also available in metric thicknesses, in as little as weeks lead-time delivered with a minimum order of only pounds.  ATP 5 cast tooling plate applications include, but are not limited to, Computer & Electronics, Pharmaceuticals, Machining fixtures, Drill jigs, Index tables, Semi-Conductor, Automotive Molds.

Standard Cut Tolerance: -0'' to +1/8''

Precision cutting (+/- '') available. call for a quote

Cast Aluminum Tooling Plate or Jig Plate

Is known by various trade names:

Mic 6® (a registered trademark of Aloca Inc)

Alpase KS® (a registered trademark of TST, Inc)

Alca 5™ (a trademark of PCP Canada)

Vista Metals ATP 5™ (a trademark of Vista Metals Corp.)

Alimex

Band saw cut Circles now available! Click Here: Circle Cut Cast Plate

Sours: https://www.midweststeelsupply.com/store/castaluminumplateatp5

Vs 6061 aluminum tooling plate

Likes Likes:  0
  1. ,  AM#1
    Join Date
    Aug
    Location
    Nevada,Iowa
    Posts
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    28
    Likes (Received)
    86

    Post

    I have always called cast aluminum "aluminum tooling plate". There are several machines at work that have pieces of aluminum that have cracked and broke, when I ordered new parts they told me they were waiting for materials and he refered to it as MIC 6. What is this stuff, and is there a beter alloy to handle a bit more shock?

    Luke

  2. ,  AM#2
    Join Date
    Jul
    Location
    Houston, TX USA
    Posts
    32,
    Post Thanks / Like

    Post

    MIC 6 is cast aluminum tooling plate.

    There are better aluminums available for strength applications, such as T

    Tooling plate is nice on flatness, finish and parallelism - but maybe you don't require those features

    John

  3. ,  PM#3
    Join Date
    Feb
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Post

    "MIC 6 is cast aluminum tooling plate"

    And ground isn't it?

    Randy

  4. ,  PM#4
    Join Date
    Oct
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    24
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    The Mic 6 I have seen was cast Al. Blanchard ground, guaranteed to be flat. It really sucks to cut. It doesn't form nice chipspretty gummy. It's lacking the alloying agents of it's cousins. The one advantage to Mic it's extremeley stable. When a larger pattern is cut out of a sheet it usually stays relatively flat. Make the same part with a tempered alloy (T6, T-3, etc.) and expect to see a lot of movement.

  5. ,  PM#5
    Join Date
    Mar
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7
    Likes (Received)
    12

    Post

    "The Mic 6 I have seen was cast Al. Blanchard ground, guaranteed to be flat. It really sucks to cut. It doesn't form nice chipspretty gummy."

    Here and I thought it was just me!

    Best,

    BW

  6. ,  PM#6
    Join Date
    Apr
    Location
    Benton, IL USA
    Posts
    4,
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7
    Likes (Received)
    48

  7. ,  PM#7
    Join Date
    Jan
    Location
    waverly nebraska
    Posts
    91
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    Also for what's worth, it doesn't anodize especially well.

    Bernie

  8. ,  PM#8
    Join Date
    Jan
    Location
    Temple, Texas
    Posts
    2,
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)

    Post

    I have used this material for several years because I often need jig plate. Here is the source of inexpensive material that I have used in the past.

    http://www.sandsmachine.com/alumweb.htm

    I have no connection with this supplier other than I am a happy customer. I keep quite a bit of it around. It is a little gummy to machine, but not really that bad.

  9. ,  AM#9
    Join Date
    Nov
    Location
    Near Flagstaff, AZ, USA
    Posts
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    8

    Post

    It really sucks to cut. It doesn't form nice chipspretty gummy.
    That's why I've referred to it as "sh*t plate" for the last 25 years. [img]tongue.gif[/img]

  10. ,  PM#10
    Join Date
    May
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    2,
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    Likes (Received)

    Post

    The real question is why the machine parts actually broke If the machines that contain the MIC 6 (cast) parts are being used in ways for which they weren't designed, you may want to consider duplicating the parts out of wrought alloy (or even ). If, on the other hand the design is lousy, and the parts broke in "normal" use, you might want to discuss that at some length with the machine manufacturer.

    I agree with most of the observations about the material characteristics. My company builds optical metrology gear that requires a high degree of stability, so we use (and specify) a lot of cast aluminum plate. It is typically precision surfaced to flatness and thickness, it is gummy, and its structural strength is not as good as wrought plate, but -- it IS very stable. It requires some elbow grease application of fine Scotchbrite to get a decent anodize finish. What kind of machine are you trying to repair?

  11. ,  PM#11
    Join Date
    Jan
    Location
    Temple, Texas
    Posts
    2,
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)

    Post

    Just a point about jig plate. Jig plate exists because it can be made flat and stay flat (ie, its stable). It is a cast material (no matter what alloy). Rolled material has too much residual stress to be stable. Because jig plate is cast - it contains no cold work. It also contains no alloying metals that would harden and strengthen it. So it is pretty soft. Machines poorly compared to T6 and is weaker. But it is stable. So if you want flat stable material, get jig plate - and be prepared for the other properties.

  12. ,  PM#12
    Join Date
    Jun
    Location
    California
    Posts
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7
    Likes (Received)
    46

    Post

    Just wondering if all cast aluminum tool plate was referred to as Mic 6?We have some BIG cast aluminum tooling fixtures.Some are in the neighborhood of 1"x48"x".They are flat but not within ,,more like which is pretty good for something that size.Also,they don't appear to come blanchard ground as mentioned above but more like a "stripped" finish.Very shiny & only radial lines in one direction are visible.And it comes in with the backing tape on both sides that we peel off.Anyway,just wondering if this was the same as Mic 6 or something different.

  13. ,  AM#13
    Join Date
    Oct
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    39
    Likes (Received)
    17

    Post

    We also use plenty of this cast plate and try to spec Alpase KS from Clinton Aluminum if we can. It's closer to a series aluminum and the Mic 6 is a series. What we buy is not ground but machined in one pass with a very large facemill after casting. The Alpase actually machines very nicely for us. http://www.clintalum.com/aluminum/alpase.htm
    http://www.alro.com/SECPromos/promos_alumplate.htm

  14. ,  AM#14
    Join Date
    Jan
    Location
    Temple, Texas
    Posts
    2,
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)

    Post

    TruPo -
    As may be obvious from jbhill's comments, jig plate is a generic term to describe cast plate. It is available in several alloys. Mic6 is just one of them.

  15. ,  AM#15
    Join Date
    Nov
    Location
    littlestown,pa
    Posts
    1,
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    72
    Likes (Received)
    22

    Post

    Little bits from past experience.
    castk tensile
    castk tensile
    welds great, machines freat
    3 digit suffix-tensile stress releived
    can go over 90K tensile-tough to weld

    Thats all I have at AM, no books around,to check othe facts, but if you need any more, email and I'll check. Good luck and God Bless

  16. ,  AM#16
    Join Date
    Aug
    Location
    Nevada,Iowa
    Posts
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    28
    Likes (Received)
    86

    Post

    Thanks for the info, guys. I've been up in northern Minnesota on vacation and not able to get out here.

    It sounds like tooling plate and MIC 6 are the same.

    The parts that have broke are three different parts from three different vintage palletizers. Some of them I have replaced with while others may be a bit difficult since they are about 3/4"x18"x24".

    I did mention to the manufacture that these failure have occurred on their new machines and not there older ones. He seemed interested, but I doubt there will be much change. I don't see our factory expanding with any lines in the future; meaning more problems won't be arriving.

    Luke

  17. ,  AM#17
    Join Date
    Nov
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    3,
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    Likes (Received)

    Post

    Tooling plate (down here) is t6 that is "kinda" flat. But not Mic6.

    With my suppliers, Mic6 is only called Mic

    (I got burned one day sasking for tooling plate, when what I wanted was MicDamn Trident metals)

    I machine lots of Mic6, and IMHO it machines better than , b/c it does not load up flutes.
    But that is just me.

    Doug.

  18. ,  AM#18
    Join Date
    Jan
    Location
    Lockport, NY
    Posts
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7
    Likes (Received)
    8

    Post

    DougWhen you machine it, what speed and feed rates do you typically use, and how do they differ from machining ? What type of features do you typically machine in Mic6-slots, holes, etc?

  19. ,  PM#19
    Join Date
    Mar
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Has anyone tried Formodal tooling plate? I have heard really good reviews elsewhere but not sure if they are sold a ton of places in the US.

Quick NavigationGeneral - ArchiveTop
  • Site Areas
  • Settings
  • Private Messages
  • Subscriptions
  • Who's Online
  • Search Forums
  • Forums Home
  • Forums
  • Manufacturing Today
    1. CNC Machining
    2. CAD / CAM
    3. Additive Manufacturing/3D Printing
    4. Robots and Automation
    5. Manufacturing in America and Europe
    6. Shop Management and Owner Issues
    7. General
    8. Material Handling and Rigging
    9. Fabrication: CNC Laser, Waterjet, Plasma, Welding & Fab
    10. EDM Machining
    11. Abrasive Machining
    12. Metrology
    13. Woodworking and Woodworking Machinery
    14. General - Archive
  • Specific Machine Forums
    1. Haas
    2. Makino
    3. Mazak
    4. Okuma
    5. Baileigh [Sponsored Forum]
    6. Toyoda
    7. DMG MORI, Gildemeister, Maho CNC
    8. Deckel, Maho, Aciera, Abene Mills
    9. Schaublin, Cazeneuve, Weiler, Graziano, Mori Seiki Lathes
    10. Cincinnati Milacron, Kearney Trecker, VN, USA Heavy Iron
    11. Bridgeport and Hardinge Mills and Lathes
    12. Monarch Lathes
    13. South Bend Lathes
    14. Warner & Swasey Alumni
  • Open Discussion
    1. Machine Reconditioning, Scraping and Inspection
    2. Antique Machinery and History
    3. Gunsmithing
    4. Transformers, Phase Converters and VFD
    5. Greatest Hits and Links
  • Commerce
    1. Career Opportunities
    2. Career Opportunities Wanted
    3. Manufacturing Resource
    4. Machinery for Sale or Wanted
    5. Tooling, Parts and Accessories For Sale or Wanted
  • Machinery Manual, Brochure and Photo Archives
    1. Machinery Manuals & Brochures
    2. Member and Shop Photos
    3. Machinery Photos
  • Forum features
    1. Images and Links
    2. Interesting Facts

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Forum Rules

Notice

This website or its third-party tools process personal data (e.g. browsing data or IP addresses) and use cookies or other identifiers, which are necessary for its functioning and required to achieve the purposes illustrated in the cookie policy. To learn more, please refer to the cookie policy. In case of sale of your personal information, you may opt out by sending us an email via our Contact Us page. To find out more about the categories of personal information collected and the purposes for which such information will be used, please refer to our privacy policy. You accept the use of cookies or other identifiers by closing or dismissing this notice, by scrolling this page, by clicking a link or button or by continuing to browse otherwise.

Sours: https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/
7075 vs 6061 test

That is, the tiger is most likely not an invention, but we threw away the weapon. With knives against the tiger, ha. Yes, he will tear us apart before we have time to take the knives. Or maybe, at night, sneak up and carry one by one. And who will he start with, I wonder.

You will also be interested:

The excited guy kissed and sucked, licked and bit all parts of the woman's body, which he could only reach. Cyril's hands found the fastener of the bra on the back of his groaning mistress and took it off. Before the gaze of an excited man, the gorgeous breasts of an adult woman appeared - large, elastic, the nipples were not very large.

But the main thing was their color - tenderly pink, and against the background of the dark skin they looked simply amazing.



234 235 236 237 238