Sertraline dosage 200 mg

Sertraline dosage 200 mg DEFAULT

Sertraline, Oral Tablet

Important warnings

  • Serotonin syndrome: This drug may cause a possibly life-threatening condition called serotonin syndrome. The symptoms of serotonin syndrome include hallucinations and delusions, agitation, coma, fast heart rate, and changes in blood pressure. They also include dizziness, loss of consciousness, seizures, shakiness, muscle tremor or stiff muscles, sweating, nausea, and vomiting.
  • Severe allergic reaction: This drug can sometimes cause a severe allergic reaction. Call or go to the emergency room right away if you have swelling of your face, tongue, or throat, or you have trouble breathing. A severe allergic reaction may cause death. You should not take this medication again if you have ever had an allergic reaction to it.
  • Increased bleeding: This drug may increase your risk for bleeding or bruising if used with aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen or naproxen, or the blood thinner warfarin. Talk with your doctor if you’re taking or planning to take any prescription or over-the-counter medications that increase the risk of bleeding.
  • Sexual problems (dysfunction): This drug may cause sexual problems. Symptoms may include decreased sex drive, delayed orgasm or inability to have an orgasm, problems getting or keeping an erection, and ejaculation problems. Contact your doctor if you experience any changes in sexual function.

What is sertraline?

Sertraline oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand-name drug Zoloft. It’s also available as a generic drug. Generic drugs usually cost less. In some cases, they may not be available in every strength or form as the brand-name version. This drug is also available as an oral solution.

Why it’s used

This drug is used to treat major depressive disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, social anxiety disorder, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

This drug may be used as part of a combination therapy. This means you may need to take it with other medications.

How it works

This drug belongs to a class of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way. These drugs are often used to treat similar conditions.

This drug works by increasing the amount of serotonin, a natural substance in your brain, that helps maintain mental health balance. This can improve the symptoms of depression and anxiety.

Sertraline side effects

Sertraline oral tablet may cause drowsiness, insomnia, or both. It may also cause other side effects.

More common side effects

The adult side effects for this drug are slightly different from the side effects for children. Side effects for adults and children can include:

  • nausea, loss of appetite, diarrhea, and indigestion
  • change in sleep habits, including increased sleepiness and insomnia
  • increased sweating
  • sexual problems, including decreased sex drive and ejaculation failure
  • tremor or shaking
  • tiredness and fatigue
  • agitation

Additional side effects for children can include:

  • abnormal increase in muscle movement or agitation
  • nose bleed
  • more frequent urination
  • urine leakage
  • aggressiveness
  • heavy menstrual periods
  • slowed growth rate and weight change. You should closely watch your child’s height and weight while they take this drug.

If these effects are mild, they may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. If they’re more severe or don’t go away, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Serious side effects

Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency. Serious side effects and their symptoms can include the following:

  • Suicide attempts
  • Acting on dangerous impulses
  • Aggressive or violent behavior
  • Thoughts about suicide or dying
  • New or worse depression
  • New or worse anxiety or panic attacks
  • Agitation, restlessness, anger, or irritability
  • Trouble sleeping
  • An increase in activity or talking more than normal
  • Serotonin syndrome. This condition can be life-threatening. Symptoms can include:
    • hallucinations and delusions
    • agitation
    • loss of consciousness
    • seizures
    • coma
    • fast heart rate
    • changes in blood pressure
    • muscle tremor or stiff muscles
    • dizziness
    • shakiness
    • sweating
    • nausea
    • vomiting
    • muscle rigidity
  • Severe allergic reactions. Symptoms can include:
    • trouble breathing
    • swelling of your face, tongue, eyes, or mouth
    • rash, itchy welts (hives) or blisters, alone or with fever or joint pain
  • Abnormal bleeding
  • Seizures or convulsions
  • Manic episodes. Symptoms can include:
    • greatly increased energy
    • severe trouble sleeping
    • racing thoughts
    • reckless behavior
    • unusually grand ideas
    • excessive happiness or irritability
    • talking more or faster than usual
  • Changes in appetite or weight. You should check the weight and height of children and adolescents often while they take this drug.
  • Low sodium levels. Seniors may be at greater risk for this. Symptoms can include:
    • headache
    • weakness or unsteadiness
    • confusion, problems concentrating or thinking, or memory problems
  • Eye pain
  • Changes in vision, including blurred and double vision
  • Swelling or redness in or around your eyes

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible side effects. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always discuss possible side effects with a healthcare provider who knows your medical history.

Sertraline may interact with other medications

Sertraline oral tablet can interact with other medications, vitamins, or herbs you may be taking. An interaction is when a substance changes the way a drug works. This can be harmful or prevent the drug from working well.

To help avoid interactions, your doctor should manage all of your medications carefully. Be sure to tell your doctor about all medications, vitamins, or herbs you’re taking. To find out how this drug might interact with something else you’re taking, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Drugs you should not use with sertraline

Do not take these drugs with sertraline. When they are used with sertraline, they can cause dangerous effects in your body. These drugs include:

  • Pimozide. Taking this drug with sertraline can cause serious heart problems.
  • Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) such as isocarboxazid, phenelzine, and tranylcypromine. Taking these drugs with sertraline increases your risk for serotonin syndrome. You must also wait 14 days between taking these drugs and taking sertraline.
  • Linezolid, intravenous methylene blue. Taking this drugs with sertraline increases your risk for serotonin syndrome.

Interactions that increase the risk of side effects

Taking certain medications with sertraline may result in increased side effects. These drugs include:

  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen, naproxen, aspirin and warfarin. Taking these drugs with sertraline increases your risk for bleeding or bruising.
  • Triptans such as sumatriptan. Your risk for serotonin syndrome is increased when you take these drugs with sertraline. Your doctor should watch you closely if you take these drugs together.
  • Lithium. Taking this drug with lithium increases your risk for serotonin syndrome.
  • Serotonergic medications such as fentanyl, tramadol, and St John’s wort. Taking these drugs with sertraline increases your risk for serotonin syndrome.
  • Cimetidine. Taking cimetidine with sertraline may cause a build-up of sertraline in your body. Your dose of sertraline might need to be lowered if you take it with cimetidine.
  • Tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline, desipramine, and imipramine. Taking sertraline with these drugs may cause these drugs to build up in your body. Your doctor may need to adjust your dosage of tricyclic antidepressants while you take sertraline.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs interact differently in each person, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible interactions. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always speak with your healthcare provider about possible interactions with all prescription drugs, vitamins, herbs and supplements, and over-the-counter drugs that you are taking.

Sertraline warnings

Sertraline oral tablet comes with several warnings.

Allergy warning

This drug can cause a severe allergic reaction. Symptoms can include:

  • trouble breathing
  • swelling of your face, tongue, eyes, or mouth
  • rash, itchy welts (hives) or blisters, alone or with fever or joint pain

If you have an allergic reaction, call your doctor or local poison control center right away. If your symptoms are severe, call or go to the nearest emergency room.

Don’t take this drug again if you’ve ever had an allergic reaction to it. Taking it again could be fatal (cause death).

Alcohol interaction

Drinking alcohol while you take sertraline can increase your risk for sleepiness. It can also affect your ability to make decisions, think clearly, or react quickly. If you drink alcohol, talk to your doctor.

Warnings for people with certain health conditions

For people with glaucoma: Taking this drug may trigger a glaucoma attack. If you have glaucoma, talk to your doctor before taking this drug.

For people with bipolar disorder: Taking this drug may trigger a manic episode. If you have a history of mania or bipolar disorder, talk to your doctor before using this drug.

For people with seizures: Taking this drug increases your risk for seizures. If you already have seizures, talk to your doctor before taking this drug. If you have a seizure while using this drug, you should stop taking it.

For people with kidney problems: If you have kidney problems or a history of kidney disease, you may not be able to clear this drug from your body well. This may increase the levels of this drug in your body and cause more side effects. This drug may also decrease your kidney function, making your kidney disease worse.

For people with liver problems: If you have liver problems or a history of liver disease, your body may not be able to process this drug as well. This may increase the levels of this drug in your body and cause more side effects.

Warnings for other groups

For pregnant women: This drug is a category C pregnancy drug. That means two things:

  1. Research in animals has shown adverse effects to the fetus when the mother takes the drug.
  2. There haven’t been enough studies done in humans to be certain how the drug might affect the fetus.

Talk to your doctor if you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant. This drug should only be used if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Call your doctor right away if you become pregnant while taking this drug.

For women who are breastfeeding: This drug may pass into breast milk and may cause side effects in a child who is breastfed. Talk to your doctor if you breastfeed your child. You may need to decide whether to stop breastfeeding or stop taking this medication.

For seniors: The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk for side effects. If you are over the age of 65 years, you may be at higher risk for developing muscle problems while taking this drug, including low salt levels in the blood (known as hyponatremia).

For children: This medication has not been studied in children as a treatment for major depressive disorder, panic disorder, post-traumatic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder. It should not be used for these disorders in people younger than 18 years.

This medication has only been studied in children with obsessive-compulsive disorder. For treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder, it should not be used in people younger than 6 years.

How to take sertraline

This dosage information is for sertraline oral tablet. All possible dosages and drug forms may not be included here. Your dosage, drug form, and how often you take the drug will depend on:

  • your age
  • the condition being treated
  • how severe your condition is
  • other medical conditions you have
  • how you react to the first dose

Forms and strengths

Generic: sertraline

  • Form: Oral tablet
  • Strengths: 25 mg, 50 mg, mg
  • Form: Oral solution
  • Strengths: 20 mg/mL

Brand: Zoloft

  • Form: Oral tablet
  • Strengths: 25 mg, 50 mg, mg
  • Form: Oral solution
  • Strengths: 20 mg/mL

Dosage for major depressive disorder

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

  • The typical starting dose is 50 mg per day.
  • Your doctor will slowly increase your dose every week, as needed.
  • The maximum dose is mg per day.

Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

The use of this drug to treat children with this condition has not been studied. It should not be used in people younger than 18 years.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk for side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

Dosage for obsessive-compulsive disorder

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

  • The typical starting dose is 50 mg per day.
  • Your doctor will slowly increase your dose every week, as needed.
  • The maximum dose is mg per day.

Child dosage (ages 0–5 years)

The use of this drug to treat this condition in children hasn’t been studied. It shouldn’t be used in people younger than 6 years.

Child dosage (ages 6–12 years)

  • The typical starting dose is 25 mg per day.
  • Your doctor will slowly increase your dose every week, as needed.
  • The maximum dose is mg per day.

Child dosage (ages 13–17)

  • The typical starting dose is 50 mg per day.
  • Your doctor will slowly increase your dose every week, as needed.
  • The maximum dose is mg per day.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk for side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

Dosage for panic disorder

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

  • The typical starting dose is 25 mg per day. This is usually increased to 50 mg per day after 1 week.
  • Your doctor will slowly increase your dose every week, as needed.
  • The maximum dose is mg per day.

Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

The use of this drug to treat children with this condition has not been studied. It should not be used in people younger than 18 years.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk for side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

Dosage for post-traumatic stress disorder

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

  • The typical starting dose is 25 mg per day. This is usually increased to 50 mg per day after 1 week.
  • Your doctor will slowly increase your dose every week, as needed.
  • The maximum dose is mg per day.

Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

The use of this drug to treat children with this condition has not been studied. It should not be used in people younger than 18 years.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk for side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

Dosage for social anxiety disorder

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

  • The typical starting dose is 25 mg per day. This is usually increased to 50 mg per day after 1 week.
  • Your doctor will slowly increase your dose every week, as needed.
  • The maximum dose is mg per day.

Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

The use of this drug to treat children with this condition has not been studied. It should not be used in people younger than 18 years.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk for side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

Dosage for premenstrual dysphoric disorder

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

The typical starting dose is 50 mg per day, throughout your menstrual cycle.

Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

The use of this drug to treat children with this condition has not been studied. It should not be used in people younger than 18 years.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk for side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this list includes all possible dosages. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always to speak with your doctor or pharmacist about dosages that are right for you.

Take as directed

Sertraline oral tablet is used for long-term treatment. It comes with serious risks if you don’t take it as prescribed.

If you stop taking the drug suddenly or don’t take it at all: Your depression will not get better. It may even get worse. Do not stop taking this drug without first talking to your healthcare provider. Stopping your drug too quickly may cause serious symptoms, including:

  • anxiety, irritability, high or low mood, restlessness, and changes in your sleep habits
  • headache, sweating, nausea, and dizziness
  • electric shock-like sensations, shaking, and confusion

If you miss doses or don’t take the drug on schedule: Your medication may not work as well or may stop working completely. For this drug to work well, a certain amount needs to be in your body at all times.

If you take too much: You could have dangerous levels of the drug in your body. Symptoms of an overdose of this drug can include:

  • tiredness
  • vomiting
  • fast heart rate
  • nausea
  • dizziness
  • agitation
  • tremors

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor or local poison control center. If your symptoms are severe, call or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

What to do if you miss a dose: Take your dose as soon as you remember. But if you remember just a few hours before your next scheduled dose, take only one dose. Never try to catch up by taking two doses at once. This could result in dangerous side effects.

How to tell if the drug is working: You will know that this drug is working if you notice that your depression symptoms are less severe or happen less often. This may take up to 4 weeks. When you do start to feel better, don’t stop taking it. Continue to take it as your doctor told you.

Important considerations for taking this drug

Keep these considerations in mind if your doctor prescribes sertraline oral tablet for you.

General

  • You can take this drug with or without food.
  • You can cut or crush the tablet.
  • Not every pharmacy stocks this drug. When filling your prescription, be sure to call ahead.

Storage

  • Store this drug at room temperature between 59°F and 86°F (15°C and 30°C). Keep it away from light.
  • Don’t store this medication in moist or damp areas, such as bathrooms.
  • Keep the bottle closed tightly.

Refills

A prescription for this medication is refillable. You should not need a new prescription for this medication to be refilled. Your doctor will write the number of refills authorized on your prescription.

Travel

Always carry your drugs with you when you travel.

  • When flying, never put it into a checked bag. Keep it in your carry-on bag.
  • Don’t worry about airport x-ray machines. They can’t hurt your medication.
  • You may need to show airport staff the pharmacy label for your medication. Always carry the original prescription-labeled box with you.
  • Don’t put this medication in your car’s glove compartment or leave it in the car. Be sure to avoid doing this when the weather is very hot or very cold.

Clinical monitoring

Your doctor will monitor you for certain health issues. This is done to make sure you stay safe while you take this drug. Your doctor will check:

  • Your mental health and symptoms of depression. Your doctor will monitor your symptoms of depression to make sure that this drug is working and that you’re not having suicidal thoughts. They’ll watch you closely during the first few months after you start taking this drug or if you have had dose changes.
  • Sodium levels. Your doctor may check the amount sodium in your body. Your doctor may do this when you start using this drug and at other times while you are taking it.
  • Eye pressure. Your doctor may check the pressure of your eyes regularly while you take this drug. Your doctor will do this if you have a history of increased eye pressure or are at risk for certain types of glaucoma.
  • Cholesterol levels. This drug can increase your cholesterol. Your doctor will check your cholesterol levels to make sure that they are not getting too high.
  • Liver function. Your doctor will check how well your liver is working while you take this drug. If your liver isn’t working well, your doctor may decide to lower your dose of this drug.

Insurance

Many insurance companies require a prior authorization for this drug. This means your doctor will need to get approval from your insurance company before your insurance company will pay for the prescription.

Are there any alternatives?

There are other drugs available to treat your condition. Some may be better suited for you than others. Talk to your doctor about other drug options that may work for you.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.

Sours: https://www.healthline.com/health/sertraline-oral-tablet

Sertraline - Brand name: Lustral

1. About sertraline

Sertraline is a type of antidepressant known as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI).

It's often used to treat depression, and also sometimes panic attacks,obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Sertraline helps many people recover from depression, and has fewer unwanted side effects than older antidepressants.

Sertraline comes as tablets, which are available only on prescription.

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2. Key facts

  • It usually takes 4 to 6 weeks for sertraline to work.
  • Side effects such as feeling sick, headaches and trouble sleeping are common. They're usually mild and go away after a couple of weeks.
  • If you and your doctor decide to take you off sertraline, your doctor will probably recommend reducing your dose gradually to help prevent extra side effects.

3. Who can and cannot take sertraline

Sertraline can be taken by adults for depression or obsessive compulsive disorder.

Sertraline can be taken by children aged 6 to 17, but only for obsessive compulsive disorder.

Check with your doctor before starting sertraline if you:

  • have had an allergic reaction to sertraline or any other medicines in the past
  • have a heart problem – sertraline can speed up or change your heartbeat
  • have ever taken any other medicines for depression – some rarely used antidepressants can interfere with sertraline to cause very high blood pressure, even when they have been stopped for a few weeks
  • are trying to become pregnant, already pregnant or breastfeeding
  • have an eye problem called glaucoma – sertraline can increase the pressure in your eye
  • have epilepsy or are having electroconvulsive treatment – sertraline may increase your risk of having a seizure

If you have diabetes, sertraline can make it more difficult to keep your blood sugar stable.

Monitor your blood sugar more often for the first few weeks of treatment with sertraline and adjust your diabetes treatment if necessary.

4. How and when to take it

Take sertraline once a day. You can take sertraline with or without food.

You can choose to take sertraline at any time, as long as you stick to the same time every day.

If you have trouble sleeping, it's best to take it in the morning.

Dosage

The usual dose of sertraline is 50mg a day in adults. But it might be started at a lower dose, then increased gradually to a maximum dose of mg a day.

If you have liver problems, your doctor might give you a lower dose or advise you to take sertraline less often.

The usual dose of sertraline in children aged 6 to 12 is 25mg a day, but this may be increased to 50mg a day after a week.

The usual dose of sertraline in children aged 13 to 17 is 50mg a day. Children aged 6 to 17 might have their dose increased up to mg a day, if needed.

What if I forget to take it?

If you occasionally forget to take a dose, do not worry. Take your next dose the next day at the usual time. Never take 2 doses at the same time to make up for a forgotten one.

If you forget doses often, it may help to set an alarm to remind you. You could also ask your pharmacist for advice on other ways to help you remember to take your medicine.

What if I take too much?

The amount of sertraline that can lead to an overdose varies from person to person.

Urgent advice: Call your doctor straight away if:

You have taken too much sertraline and have symptoms such as:

  • being sick (vomiting)
  • shaking
  • feeling sleepy
  • dizziness
  • fast heart rate
  • fits or seizures

If you need to go to A&E, do not drive yourself – get someone else to drive you or call for an ambulance.

Take the sertraline packet, or the leaflet inside it, plus any remaining medicine with you.

Information:

You can report any suspected side effect using the Yellow Card safety scheme.

Visit Yellow Card for further information.

6. Pregnancy and breastfeeding

Sertraline and pregnancy

It's important for you and your baby that you stay well during your pregnancy.

If you become pregnant while taking sertraline, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking your medicine unless your doctor tells you to.

Sertraline has been linked to a very small increased risk of problems for your unborn baby.

But if your depression is not treated during pregnancy, this can also increase the chance of problems.

You may take sertraline during pregnancy if you need it to remain well. Your doctor can explain the risks and the benefits, and will help you decide which treatment is best for you and your baby.

Sertraline and breastfeeding

If your doctor or health visitor says your baby is healthy, sertraline is one of the preferred antidepressants to take when breastfeeding. It has been used by many breastfeeding mothers without any problems.

Sertraline passes into breast milk in tiny amounts and has been linked with side effects in a very few breastfed babies.

But it's important to continue taking sertraline to keep you well. Breastfeeding will also benefit both you and your baby.

If you notice that your baby is not feeding as well as usual or seems unusually sleepy, or if you have any other concerns about your baby, talk to your health visitor or doctor as soon as possible.

Non-urgent advice: Tell your doctor if you're:

  • trying to get pregnant
  • pregnant
  • breastfeeding

For more information about how sertraline can affect you and your baby during pregnancy, read the leaflet about the best use of medicines in pregnancy (BUMPS).

7. Cautions with other medicines

Some medicines and sertraline can interfere with each other and increase the chances of you having side effects.

  • any medicines that affect your heartbeat – sertraline can speed up or change your heartbeat
  • any other medicines for depression – some antidepressants can interfere with sertraline to cause very high blood pressure even when they have been stopped

Mixing sertraline with herbal remedies and supplements

Do not take St John's wort, the herbal remedy for depression, while you're being treated with sertraline as this will increase your risk of side effects.

Important: Medicine safety

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you're taking any other medicines, including herbal medicines, vitamins or supplements.

8. Common questions about sertraline

Sours: https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/sertraline/
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Zoloft for anxiety: Is Zoloft good for anxiety? When does it start working?

Living with anxiety can make daily life difficult. Fortunately, there are many treatment options available for anxiety that can help people find relief from their symptoms. Zoloft is one medication that may help. In this guide, we’ll explain to you what Zoloft is and how to take it for anxiety.

Taking Zoloft for anxiety

Anxiety is a prevalent condition that affects people all over the world. An estimated 31% of all adults will experience an anxiety disorder at some point in their life, and SingleCare’s anxiety survey found that 62% of respondents experienced some degree of anxiety. Zoloft is the brand name of a generic medication called sertraline. It’s a type of antidepressant called a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) that treats anxiety by slowing down the reabsorption of serotonin. Zoloft treats several mental health conditions:  

Zoloft may treat anxiety if psychological treatments, like cognitive behavioral therapy, aren’t working or if a psychiatrist thinks it will improve someone’s quality of life. SSRIs like Zoloft aren’t always the best medication for anxiety, as they can worsen anxiety in some cases. People with mild or occasional anxiety should talk with their doctor about other anxiety medications before taking Zoloft.

What’s the right Zoloft dosage for anxiety?

The right dosage of Zoloft for anxiety varies by the severity of anxiety and whether the patient has other medical conditions. In general, though, the initial therapeutic dosage of Zoloft for anxiety is 25 mg or 50 mg per day.  

Zoloft tablets are available in three dosage strengths: 25 mg, 50 mg, and mg. The maximum dose of Zoloft is mg per day (which can be taken as two mg tablets).   

Most studies suggest that the most effective dose of Zoloft is 50 mg per day. This dose is proven to be the most effective and tolerable dose for most patients. People who don’t respond to 50 mg per day may be advised by their doctor to increase their dose of Zoloft by 50 mg per day at weekly intervals to a maximum of mg per day. For example, a doctor might recommend taking 50 mg daily for one week, then mg daily for one week, etc.

Zoloft is also available in liquid form as an oral solution. The oral solution comes as a clear, colorless solution with a menthol scent that contains 20 mg of sertraline per mL, at 12% alcohol. It comes in a 60 mL bottle with a calibrated dropper with 25 mg and 50 mg graduation marks. Zoloft oral solution must be mixed (just before taking) into 4 ounces of water, orange juice, lemonade, ginger ale, or lemon or lime soda before consumption.      

When does Zoloft start working for anxiety?

Zoloft doesn’t work immediately, so don’t stop taking Zoloft if your symptoms don’t improve right away. It takes two to six weeks to start reducing anxiety symptoms. Some people may feel a reduction in their anxiety symptoms within the first week of taking Zoloft, but this shouldn&#;t be expected for everyone. 

How does Zoloft make you feel?

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, some of the earliest signs that Zoloft is working are improvements in sleep, energy, or appetite. These improvements could happen one to two weeks into taking the medication. 

More significant changes, like feeling less depressed or regaining interest in daily life, may take six to eight weeks to occur. Over time, many people will notice a substantial difference in their anxiety symptoms, and some people may eventually have no symptoms at all.

Side effects

Here are the most common side effects of Zoloft you may experience when you start taking it: 

  • Headache
  • Dizziness 
  • Loss of appetite
  • Lightheadedness 
  • Dry mouth
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Increased sweating
  • Restlessness
  • Sexual side effects like sexual dysfunction
  • Fatigue
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Nervousness 

Although it’s rare, Zoloft may cause more serious side effects like unusual weight loss, low sodium blood levels, increased risk of bleeding (especially when combined with certain drugs like blood thinners or NSAIDs), seizures, allergic reactions, and withdrawal symptoms. 

Warnings

Zoloft also comes with a black box warning for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Short-term studies have shown that antidepressants increased the risk of suicidality in children, adolescents, and young adults compared to a placebo. However, people of any age who take Zoloft should be monitored, so seek medical advice right away if you’re taking Zoloft and start to have extreme mood changes and/or suicidal thoughts or behaviors.

The Food and Drug Administration also warns patients against taking sertraline (Zoloft) if they are pregnant, breastfeeding, have preexisting eye problems (sertraline makes patients more susceptible to developing glaucoma), and those with bipolar disorder who are not also taking a mood stabilizer.

Interactions

Talk to your doctor about how to take Zoloft if you’re taking any of the following medications:

  • Other medications that increase serotonin because of the risk of serotonin syndrome
  • Disulfiram
  • Triptans 
  • Blood thinners such as warfarin 
  • NSAIDs such as ibuprofen 
  • St. John’s Wort 
  • Lithium 
  • Nardil (phenelzine) 
  • Parnate (tranylcypromine) 
  • Marplan (isocarboxazid) 
  • Azilect (rasagiline) 
  • Emsam (selegiline)
  • Orap (pimozide)

Zoloft taken with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) or other drugs that increase serotonin (such as other antidepressants, triptans, and dextromethorphan, which is found in cough and cold products) could cause serotonin syndrome, a life-threatening emergency that can cause hallucinations, seizures, comas, tremors, delirium, and other serious side effects.

What is the most effective antidepressant for anxiety?

There is no single antidepressant that’s best for treating anxiety. What works for one person may not work for another. Depression symptoms will completely go away for about 1 out of every 3 people who take SSRIs, but more research still needs to be done on why SSRIs work for some people and not for others. Your healthcare provider is the best person to ask which antidepressant will be most effective for you.  

“Other SSRI medications can be effective for anxiety such as Prozac or Celexa or Paxil, yet each has some side effects—notably lowered libido and weight gain,” says Uma Naidoo, MD, a psychiatrist at Mass General Hospital in Boston. “Benzodiazepines are very effective in the short term while under the care of a doctor, but these are potentially addicting medications and must be used with immense caution and only as a short-term measure, e.g., grief following the death of a family member,” says Dr. Naidoo.  

Zoloft alternatives

Effexor XR (venlafaxine ER)A serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) that treats depression and improves mood and energy levels75 mg/day taken with foodNausea, dry mouth, drowsinessGet coupon
Prozac (fluoxetine)An SSRI used to treat major depressive disorder, OCD, bulimia nervosa, and panic disorder20 mg/dayNervousness, insomnia, nauseaGet coupon
Lexapro (escitalopram)An SSRI that treats generalized anxiety disorder and major depressive disorder mg/dayInsomnia, nausea, decreased libidoGet coupon
Xanax (alprazolam)A benzodiazepine that relieves short-term anxiety mg, up to three times dailyXanax is a controlled substance because of its potential for abuse or dependence.Get coupon
Paxil (paroxetine)An SSRI that treats depression and other psychological conditions20 mg/dayNausea, drowsiness, dry mouth, sexual side effects, headache, weaknessGet coupon
Celexa (citalopram)An SSRI that’s usually prescribed for depression, but doctors can also prescribe it to help alleviate symptoms of anxiety20 mg/dayInsomnia, nausea, fatigue, increased sweating, dizziness, dry mouthGet coupon

As mentioned earlier, your healthcare provider is the best person to ask about how to treat your anxiety. Medications can be effective in treating anxiety, but Dr. Naidoo says you may have other options as well. She mentions dietary changes, mindfulness, breathing exercises, and physical exercise as additional ways to combat anxiety. Your physician can help you come up with a treatment plan that will fit well into your life. 

Sours: https://www.singlecare.com/blog/zoloft-for-anxiety/
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