Knitted log cabin blanket pattern

Knitted log cabin blanket pattern DEFAULT

Log Cabin Spectrum Blanket

A log cabin design borrowed from the quilting world, a color story filched from nature, and our newest yarn, Woolly Wool, straight from the sheep&#; Our Log Cabin Spectrum Blanket takes the best of all worlds for a blanket that is colorful, soft, cuddly, and absolutely beautiful!

Log Cabin Spectrum Blanket | Purl Soho

The gorgeous family of colors is thanks to Woolly Wool&#;s exceptional palette, a world of misty tones that bring to mind a landscape on the verge of blossoming!

Log Cabin Spectrum Blanket | Purl Soho

Woolly Wool is a single-ply super bulky with a soft and gentle beauty. It is (surprise!) % wool, warm, cozy, and definitely woolly! We love that its plumpness gives this traditional log cabin pattern a bold look with oversize stitches and a distinctive texture.

Log Cabin Spectrum Blanket | Purl Soho

On US 17 needles, this one is a total gas to knit, so fast, so interesting, and so fun! Get in on the action with our Log Cabin Spectrum Blanket Bundle, available in this Crib size and in an even bigger Throw size.

Log Cabin Spectrum Blanket | Purl Soho

Designed for Purl Soho by Jake Canton.

Share your progress + connect with the community by tagging your pics with #PurlSoho, #PurlSohoBusyHands, #PurlSohoLogCabinSpectrumBlanket, and #PurlSohoWoollyWool. We can’t wait to see what you make!

Materials

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Our Log Cabin Spectrum Blanket Bundle includes 9 (13) skeins of Purl Soho’s Woolly Wool, % wool. Each skein is yards/ grams.

  • Color A: 1 (1) skein in Heirloom White; approximately 57 (93) yards required.
  • Color B: 1 (1) skein in Ice Pond; approximately 54 (87) yards required.
  • Color C: 1 (1) skein in Gray Owl; approximately 36 (65) yards required.
  • Color D: 1 (1) skein in Peach Lily; approximately 72 () yards required.
  • Color E: 1 (1) skein in Winter Green; approximately 61 () yards required.
  • Color F: 1 (2) skein(s) in Juniper Berry; approximately () yards required.
  • Color G: 1 (2) skein(s) in Purple Moor; approximately 78 () yards required.
  • Color H: 1 (2) skein(s) in Blossom Pink; approximately () yards required.
  • Color I: 1 (2) skein(s) in Green Agave; approximately 97 () yards required.

You’ll also need…

  • US 17 (12 mm), inch circular needles
  • Spare US 11, 13 or 15, inch circular needles

NOTE: Spare needles are for putting stitches on hold that you later knit. If you’d rather use scrap yarn, you can. Just be sure you have spare needles to slip the on-hold stitches onto so you can knit them when the time comes!

Gauge

8 stitches and 16 rows [8 garter ridges] = 4 inches in garter stitch

NOTE: For the Crib size, you’ll use just about the full skein of Yarn H, and for the Throw size, you’ll use just about the full skein of Yarn D. To avoid running out of yarn, make sure to achieve this gauge and use Yarn C (of which you have plenty) for your swatch.

Sizes

Crib (Throw)

Finished Dimensions: 30 inches wide x 42 inches long (40 inches wide x 54 inches long)

Notes

Construction

Log Cabin Spectrum Blanket | Purl Soho

Garter Ridge

A “garter ridge” equals two rows of garter stitch. It looks like a prominent horizontal ridge and is an easy way to count rows!

Picking Up Stitches

For the cleanest pick-up edge, insert the needle into the outer most bump along the edge of the garter ridge.

Pattern

A Block

With Color A, cast on 12 (16) stitches. We used a basic Long Tail Cast On.

Row 1 (wrong side): Knit to end of row.

Row 2 (right side): Knit to end of row. Mark right side of fabric with scrap yarn or removeable stitch marker.

Knit every row until you have 36 (44) garter ridges (see Notes), ending with a wrong-side row. [Piece measures approximately 18 (22) inches from cast-on edge]

Slip all 12 (16) stitches onto spare needles (or scrap yarn). Cut Color A.

B Block

With right side facing you, turn piece 90 degrees clockwise so left selvage is at the top.

With Color B, pick up and knit (see Notes) 36 (44) stitches along top edge.

Knit every row until you have 12 (16) garter ridges, ending with a wrong-side row. [Piece measures approximately 6 (8) inches from pick-up edge]

Slip all 36 (44) stitches onto same spare needles (or scrap yarn). Cut Color B.

C Block

With right side facing you, turn piece 90 degrees clockwise so cast-on edge is at the top.

With Color C, pick up and knit 12 (16) stitches along B Block selvage, then 12 (16) more stitches along A Block cast-on edge. [24 (32) stitches]  

Knit every row until you have 12 (16) garter ridges, ending with a wrong-side row. [Piece measures approximately 6 (8) inches from pick-up edge]

Slip all 24 (32) stitches onto same spare needles (or scrap yarn). Cut Color C.

D Block

With right side facing you, turn piece 90 degrees clockwise so right selvages are at the top.

With Color D, pick up and knit 12 (16) stitches along C Block selvage, then 36 (44) more stitches along A Block selvage. [48 (60) stitches]

Knit every row until you have 12 (16) garter ridges, ending with a wrong-side row. [Piece measures approximately 6 (8) inches from pick-up edge]

Slip all 48 (60) stitches onto same spare needles (or scrap yarn). Cut Color D.

E Block

With right side facing you, turn piece 90 degrees clockwise so on-hold stitches from A Block are at the top.

With Color E, pick up and knit 12 (16) stitches along selvage of D Block, then with same working needles, knit across 12 (16) on-hold A Block stitches, then pick up and knit 12 (16) stitches along selvage of B Block. [36 (48) stitches]

Knit every row until you have 12 (16) garter ridges, ending with a wrong-side row. [Piece measures approximately 6 (8) inches from pick-up edge]

Slip all 36 (48) stitches onto same spare needles (or scrap yarn). Cut Color E.

F Block

With right side facing you, turn piece 90 degrees clockwise so on-hold stitches from B Block are at the top.

With Color F, pick up and knit 12 (16) stitches along selvage of E Block, then with same working needles, knit across 36 (44) on-hold B Block stitches, then pick up and knit 12 (16) stitches along selvage of C Block. [60 (76) stitches]

Knit every row until you have 12 (16) garter ridges, ending with a wrong-side row. [Piece measures approximately 6 (8) inches from pick-up edge]

With right side facing you, bind off knitwise, leaving last bind-off stitch on the needle. Cut color F.

G Block

With right side facing you, turn piece 90 degrees clockwise so on-hold stitches from C Block are at the top.

With Color G, pick up and knit 12 (16) stitches along selvage of F Block, then with same working needles, knit across 24 (32) on-hold C Block stitches, then pick up and knit 12 (16) stitches along selvage of D Block. [49 (65) stitches, including bind-off stitch from F Block]

Row 1 (wrong side): Knit to end of row.

Row 2 (right side): Slip 1 with yarn in front (wyif), knit to end of row.

Repeat Rows 1 and 2 ten (15) more times, then repeat Row 1 once more. [12 (16) garter ridges, measures approximately 6 (8) inches from pick-up edge]

With right side facing you, bind off knitwise, leaving last bind-off stitch on the needle. Cut Color G.

H Block

With right side facing you, turn piece 90 degrees clockwise so on-hold stitches from D Block are at the top.

With Color H, pick up and knit 12 (16) stitches along selvage of G Block, then with same working needles, knit across 48 (60) on-hold D Block stitches , then pick up and knit 12 (16) stitches along selvage of E Block 5. [73 (93) stitches including bind-off stitch from G Block]

Row 1 (wrong side): Knit to end of row.

Row 2 (right side): Slip 1 wyif, knit to end of row.

Repeat Row 1 and 2 ten (15) more times, then repeat Row 1 once more. [12 (16) garter ridges, measures approximately 6 (8) inches from pick-up edge]

With right side facing you, bind off knitwise, leaving last bind-off stitch on the needle. Cut Color H.

I Block

With right side facing you, turn piece 90 degrees clockwise so on-hold stitches from E Block are at the top.

With Color I, pick up and knit 12 (16) stitches along selvage of H Block, then with same working needles, knit across 36 (48) on-hold E Block stitches, then pick up and knit 12 (16) stitches along selvage of F Block. [61 (81) stitches including bind-off stitch from H Block]

Row 1 (wrong side): Slip 1 wyif, knit to end of row.

Row 2 (right side): Slip 1 wyif, knit to end of row.

Repeat Row 1 and 2 ten (15) more times, then repeat Row 1 once more. [12 (16) garter ridges, measures approximately 6 (8) inches from pick-up edge]

With right side facing you, bind off knitwise.

Finishing

Weave in the ends and steam block, if desired.

Log Cabin Spectrum Blanket | Purl Soho
Log Cabin Spectrum Blanket | Purl Soho

January 22, | Purl Bee

TAGS: Blankets, Free Knitting Pattern, Garter Stitch, Jake Canton For Purl Soho, Log Cabin, Purl Soho's Woolly Wool, Quick Projects, Super Bulky Weight Yarn

Sours: https://www.purlsoho.com/create//01/22/log-cabin-spectrum-blanket/

7 Log Cabin Knitting Patterns

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Sours: https://www.allfreeknitting.com/Knitting-Collections/Log-Cabin-Knitting-Patterns
  1. 2014 ford fiesta se problems
  2. Young black and fabulous
  3. Demography used in a sentence
  4. Another word for confident

Log Cabin Scrap Blanket

When I describe myself as a knitter, I always use the word &#;stashless&#;. This is true &#; I never, ever buy yarn unless I plan to cast-on with it right away, knowing exactly what I&#;m going to make. I have ZERO stash.

That doesn&#;t mean that I don&#;t have a &#;yarn closet&#; full of yarn. Oh, boy. I have little bits of leftover yarns from decades of projects. I&#;m able to use up some of these leftovers in the sample bits I knit up for demonstration in the videos, but I love it when I can sink my teeth into a great use of leftover yarns.

So here we have the Log Cabin Scrap Blanket. Log Cabin is a traditional quilting technique that has been adapted over the years into both knitting and crochet. This one is knit.

This pattern is a FREE RAVELRY DOWNLOAD, and includes links to a six-part video tutorial. The video is also at the bottom of this post.

Size: approx 47” by 63”
Needles: size 7 US (mm), circulars or straights
Yarn: Use up your leftover worsted yarn bits! For best results, stick with one fiber type for the whole blanket. Either animal (wool, alpaca, angora, etc.); cellulose (cotton, linen, bamboo, etc.); or acrylic. You&#;ll also want to stick with one weight of yarn. If you choose to pick a border color as I did (in black), you’ll need an additional yards of yarn for the size I indicate above.
Additional Materials: tapestry needle for weaving in ends and seaming, and clippie markers are always helpful
Gauge: 5 stitches per inch in garter stitch

Frequently Asked Questions on this pattern can be found here.

Be sure to check out my other video tutorials.

Sours: https://verypink.com//02/15/log-cabin-scrap-blanket/
LOG CABIN KNIT BLANKET SQUARE - Bernat Stitch Along
The creation of a thousand forests is in one acorn. —Ralph Waldo Emerson
The creation of a thousand log cabin blankets is in one dishrag. —Kay Gardiner

I&#;m pretty sure that if Emerson were alive today, and a knitter, he would agree with me.

In our latest little book, MDK Field Guide No. 4: Log Cabin, we were inspired not so much by Emerson as by another New Englander, Julia Child. My favorite quotation from our matron saint is this one: &#;Find something you’re passionate about, and keep tremendously interested in it.&#;

Here at Mason-Dixon Knitting, we are tremendously interested in log cabin knitting. Like Julia Child&#;s recipe for boeuf bourgignon in her book Mastering the Art of French Cooking, log cabin knitting is in our own ancient tome of a first book.

Also like Julia&#;s fancy beef stew, the first version was longer than it needed to be. We&#;ve learned some handy things since then that we&#;re eager to share with today&#;s log cabin knitters.

The first project in Field Guide No. 4 is one of the simplest knitting patterns you will ever see: six garter stitch cloths. Each cloth teaches a basic log cabin technique or a tool for constructing or finishing a log cabin project.

Each cloth also is  a useful Finished Object in its own right. (Is anyone else impatient with swatches that can&#;t be used for anything?) Just as some knitters start a sweater with a sleeve that serves as a gauge swatch, we recommend that first-time log cabin knitters start with a washcloth or two to get the hang of how log cabin works, and be ready to jump in with both feet on a bigger project.

Looking around my house, I took a census of log cabin blankets. I&#;ve made a lot of log cabin blankets in my day. Being a process knitter, I give most of them away, eventually, but the ones that have stayed home are my pride and joy.

I was delighted to see that three of the blankets sitting on the furniture in my apartment are perfect illustrations of the acorn-to-oak theory behind our log cabin cloths.

Cloth 1: Classic Log Cabin

Here&#;s the cloth:

Pretty classic. You start in the center (white patch), bind off, turn it on its side, and pick up stitches to knit a patch onto that edge (small beige patch), bind off, turn that piece on its side, and on and on. If you kept going with this cloth, adding strip after strip in a spiral, you&#;d get a mesmerizing one-patch log cabin. If you make a whole stack of classic log cabin blocks, and join them together, you get this:

Pattern: Fussy Cuts. (Coming soon as an individual PDF pattern download.)

Gah! This one was not in my apartment; it&#;s Ann&#;s Fussy Cuts, chilling on her porch. That beautiful blanket is just a stack of classic log cabin cloths, a heap of fun, easy color play, framed and joined.

Cloth 2: Courthouse Steps

Here&#;s the cloth:

At first glance, you might not see much of a difference between Cloth 1 and Cloth 2, but it&#;s there. Instead of knitting on strips in a spiral, turning and knitting a new strips onto the next adjacent side, after completing a strip on one side of the center, you go to the opposite side and add a matching strip there, and only after doing these mirrored strips do you knit a strip onto the adjacent side (and then its own opposite side).

It&#;s much easier to see the difference when the process is repeated:

Pattern: Courthouse Steps. (Coming soon as an individual PDF pattern download.)

Here&#;s another, more colorful version I made for a baby boy in

This was the first pattern I ever wrote, inspired by an important fabric quilt. At the time, my log cabin skills and my knitting logic were in their infancy. I didn&#;t yet realize that picking up the correct number of stitches on an edge was important to the squareness of the piece as it grew: if you pick up too few, you are decreasing, and if you pick up too many, you are increasing. On this first blanket, I must have picked up too many, because the lines in my Courthouse Steps gently bow outwards.

It&#;s a teachable moment, in blanket form.

This blanket is one of my most precious possessions. The Rowan Denim, once crisp, is silky soft now, its black edging washed to whisper gray. It has fade lines from lying folded at the foot of a bunk bed in front of a window. It has been a steadfast companion to a boy&#;s after-school progression from Spongebob Squarepants to Arrested Development. Just go ahead and wrap me up in it when I die.

Cloth 3: L-shape

Here&#;s the cloth:

The principle here is that the strips of a log cabin do not need to be uniform in size, or arranged symmetrically. So what?

So what is that when the strips can be in any width or arrangement, a lot of possibilities open up. Log cabin is not just a graphic pattern, it&#;s a seamless construction method.

Pattern: Moderne Log Cabin.

There is no sewing in the Moderne, and only one instance of two-colors-in-one-row (technically, intarsia, but the very simplest intarsia). Today, I&#;d avoid even that bit of intarsia, but back then, I had yet to figure out parquet squares, or how to knit a miter into a corner. Live and learn.

Or as Julia Child would say, keep tremendously interested.

There are three more cloths—so much excitement!— but we will visit them later.

Sours: https://www.moderndailyknitting.com//08/28/log-cabin-start-small/

Pattern knitted blanket log cabin

Taking a soccer ball from the car, in addition to a spray can, I went to the park. All around was empty, apparently, she liked solitude. Going behind the girl's back, I carefully threw the ball through the bushes right into her and ran after the ball. Everything went as well as possible - the ball touched her and rolled further towards the road. (Especially for.

LOG CABIN KNIT BLANKET SQUARE - Bernat Stitch Along

She had to return to that ill-fated cabin. But there was almost nothing there that reminded her of what had happened. Duvall removed the bed on which Anna fought Black, rearranged other furniture. Instead of that narrow bunk, Serge moved their bed here, on which they slept in the hut. Now theres no free space here, he remarked with a smile, but I hope now Madame will not make me sleep.

You will also like:

A cross. The ancient windows have strong wrought iron bars. Relaxing deep kiss again. A beautiful mesh blouse with an intricate pattern covered her breasts. Shiny black buttons ran from the deeply buttoned high collar to the very bottom.



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