Mitsubishi outlander 3 car seats

Mitsubishi outlander 3 car seats DEFAULT

The Mitsubishi Outlander is, on paper, one of the safest small SUVs you can buy. It has good small overlap, moderate overlap, side, and roof scores, as well as a decent amount of front crash prevention technology available in optional trim packages. It’s also one of the few small SUVs on the market with a 3rd row option. It competes with a bevy of small and compact crossovers in the US market, including the Kia Sportage, Honda CR-V, Toyota RAV4, Nissan Rogue, Mazda CX-5, Subaru Forester, Ford Escape, Jeep Compass, Hyundai Tucson, and Jeep Patriot. In other words, it’s got company, which is part of why a number of parents might not know about it. But those who do tend to be quite loyal fans of the Outlander.

As a result, when I had the opportunity to look into the Outlander’s performance in puzzling 3 car seats across the back row (and a few extra in the 3rd row), I couldn’t pass it up. This 3 across guide covers several generations of the Outlander, and while it’s not as large of a list as I’d like it to be, it’s already the largest on the Internet. Before going into the car seats I was and wan’t able to squeeze into that back rows, let’s take a quick look at some basic elements of car seat safety, in terms of which seats to use and when in order to keep your kids as safe as possible while on the road.

The safest configuration we know of when it comes to vehicle safety is rear-facing. This goes for adults as well! Rear-face your infants, toddlers, and preschoolers for as long as possible (ideally until 4!), before forward-facing them in harnessed convertible or combination seats (ideally until at least 5 or 6!). Once they outgrow their harnessed seats, it’s best to keep them restrained in high-back boosters until they’re physically and psychologically ready to use adult seat belt systems (which typically happens between 10 and 12). We want our little ones in the safest positions we know of for as long as possible to give them the greatest advantages in a collision.

Keeping these ideas in mind, I set to work to find which infant, convertible, combination, and booster seats would work best in 3 across combinations in the Mitsubishi Outlander. It’s my goal to make this list the most thorough on the Internet. If you find the list helpful when shopping for car seats, you can shop through my Amazon link below. I’ll add more seats as I test them over time.

You can access the complete 3 across guide for every vehicle here and the complete list of recommended seats here. The Canadian car seat guide is here. 3 across car seat images are courtesy of Wikipedia.

outlander - 2014 - publicdomain2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander

Guaranteed 3 across installations:

Clek Fllo (x3).

Clek Foonf (x3).

Clek Oobr (x3).

Peg Perego Flex 120 (x3).

Maxi-Cosi RodiFix (3).

Chicco KeyFIt 30 (x3).

Diono Radian RXT (x3).

Diono Radian R120 (x3).

Diono Radian R100 (x3).

Combi Coccoro (x3).

Clek Oobr (x2), Chicco KeyFIt 30.

Clek Fllo, Diono Radian / RXT, Diono Radian / RXT.

Tips and Tricks:

The current generation of the Mitsubishi Outlander is 183 inches long and 71 inches wide. This is on the longer end for a small SUV, but it’s also on the narrower end. And when you consider the fact that there’s a 3rd row squeezed in behind the 2nd, you quickly realize that you’re going to have more challenges fitting car seats into this vehicle than you’d like. However, let’s take a closer look at the pros and cons.

Good things about the current generation Outlander are that you can remove the head restraints if you need to, and that you can move the back row seats a bit forward and backward, which helps with leg room flexibility since you’re not dealing with a particularly long vehicle.

Bad things about the Outlander primarily involve the center seat in the 2nd row; it’s a very, very narrow one, and when you’ve got car seats in the outboard positions, it feels even narrower. The head restraint above this seat is also a short one. More importantly, there is a slight crossover between the buckle stalks in the center and those on the driver’s outboard side, which is often the kiss of death for car seat installations. The Radians, for example, will fit in that center position, but won’t fit as well as I’d like them to. Additionally, you can’t adjust the shoulder belt height in the 2nd row, which makes booster use more challenging than it should be.

The 3rd row goes from bad to worse. It’s better than the 3rd row in the 2nd gen Outlander, but it’s still hard to get to and you aren’t allowed to use any rear-facing seats there; everything’s got to be forward-facing, per the owner’s manual. This is almost certainly due to the short amount of space between the 2nd and 3rd row. Beyond that, you don’t have access to any top tether anchors in this row, which is significant when forward-facing tethering is important and since you’re pretty much only going to be forward-facing anyway. Oh, and you can’t sit there if you’re taller than 5’3″, per Mitsubishi. There’s also pretty much no leg room and the seat cushions are practically nonexistent. Don’t try to use the 3rd row with anyone but perhaps short kids and pre-teens in boosters. To be honest, they probably won’t be happy there either. However, it’s definitely possible to fit them there.

Because of the length of the vehicle, if you want to make the most of your money, I’d strongly recommend Radians due to the minimal amount of space they take up with angle adjusters; your legs and front-row passengers will thank you.

outlander - 2007 - publicdomain2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 Mitsubishi Outlander

Guaranteed 3 across installations:

Clek Fllo (x3).

Clek Foonf (x3).

Clek Oobr (x3).

Peg Perego Flex 120 (x3).

Maxi-Cosi RodiFix (3).

Chicco KeyFIt 30 (x3).

Diono Radian RXT (x3).

Diono Radian R120 (x3).

Diono Radian R100 (x3).

Combi Coccoro (x3).

Clek Oobr (x2), Chicco KeyFIt 30.

Clek Fllo, Diono Radian / RXT, Diono Radian / RXT.

Tips and Tricks:

The second gen of the Mitsubishi Outlander is around 183 inches long and just under 71 inches wide, or just about the same as the 3rd generation. The fact that you can fit 7 passengers into a vehicle this length is impressive. However, when it comes to car seats, you’ll again have a narrow selection to choose from due to the narrowness of the vehicle and the nearly impossible-to-use center 2nd row seat (see the extended information in the write-up for the 3rd generation Outlander above). As before, use your seat belts for every installation; LATCH will rob you of extremely valuable real estate.

Once again, because of the length of the vehicle, if you want to make the most of your money, I’d strongly recommend Radians due to the minimal amount of space they take up with angle adjusters; your legs and front-row passengers will thank you.

If you find the information on car safety, recommended car seats, and car seat reviews on this car seat blog helpful, you can bookmark and shop through this Amazon link. Canadians can bookmark and shop through this link.

3acrossSours: https://www.thecarcrashdetective.com/3-across-installations-outlander/

Kid-Testing the Mitsubishi Range

If your family currently consists of more than two young children or is due to grow in number beyond a tidy four people, then child car seats are something you probably feel you spend far too much time thinking about. And if you’re thinking of car seats then you’re thinking of cars.

Specifically, which models are going to comfortably accommodate the number of car seats your brood requires. But you can’t go around putting all your car seats in your potential new vehicle every time you take one out for a test drive, can you? Well, maybe you could but it wouldn’t be much fun.

So, to help make the decision making easier we decided to put the Mitsubishi range to the test when it comes to child car seats.

We contacted Pete from Red Cross Baby Seats in Adelaide and asked him to come on down with all his seats. We wrangled a few kids and the ultimate kid-test was on!

The reason it’s worth every cent to have your car seat professionally fitted as you know it’s done right which means your treasures are safe but also, it’s a lot of work. These professionals may make it look easy but anyone who has ever tried to fit their car seats themselves will tell you it’s not as easy as the pro’s make it look which is why we can’t stress enough the importance of getting your car seats professionally fitted.

All the Mitsubishi range is fitted with 2 ISOFIX points and some models feature an additional standard anchorage point. ISOFIX has only been introduced for child seats here in Australia since Sept 2014. So before we get into cars let’s look at how ISOFIX works.

Here are the ISOFIX connectors for the Infa Secure Kompressor II in action. The red indicator line tells you there’s not enough tension on the connection. It turns green when you get the tension right. There are two ISOFIX connectors and each one has a tension indicator. Make sure they’re both green before you use the seat.

Remember that ISOFIX might be something funky and new for car seats but it doesn’t necessarily mean your car seats will be any safer.

ISOFIX compatible car seats must always be able to be installed using your car seat belts anyway and sometimes this can work better than the ISOFIX connections!

Car 1. Mitsubishi Outlander

The first car we tackled was the ever popular Outlander. The Outlander comes in a 5 and 7 seater option and we decided to check out the 7 seat Exceed to see how many people we could comfortably fit in it.

We have heard a lot of whispers of people saying that it’s not large enough to fit three seats across the backseat … Well… Here it is with FIVE kids all safely seated in there. Three young ones in harnessed in seats AND two teens in the third row, with plenty of leg-room too!

Car 2. Mitsubishi ASX

Next was the ASX. This car was our little dark-horse. For a vehicle which appeals based on its looks we got quite a shock when we started fitting seats.

We began with two standard child seats a rear facing capsule for the baby and one for the toddler and then thought ‘let’s see if we can get three in there’. And we were suitably surprised! This car can fit three forward facing child seats and two forward facing and a rear facing. Pete from Red Cross kept saying how easy these seats were to fit and how much room there was.

For a small SUV it actually comfortably fit the seats better than others. When we looked at the vehicle specs we noticed the 2nd row shoulder room was one of the widest across the range at 1410mm. Those spec pages in brochures and on websites can help you research intricate details about the cars and are well worth a read.

And in the ASX XLS they can all look at the sky through the panoramic glass roof that will keep them calm and peaceful during the trip, sure, maybe that’s wishful thinking!

Car 3. Mitsubishi Pajero

The Pajero is one mighty vehicle. So it will be no surprise to you that this car will happily accommodate four big people and three little people with ease. The 6th and 7th seats in this beast are easily accessible through the back and passengers can simply walk in [albeit hunched] around each side of the seat.

 

 

Car 4. Mitsubishi Triton

Next up was the Triton. A practical double-cab ute (available in GLX, GLS and Exceed variants) that has two ISOFIX anchor points in the back seat row. Perfect for a rear-facing baby capsule and a Britax full seat. Keep in mind this vehicle only has the two points. There is no third and so 3 child seats cannot be fitted across the back. Although as it is generally a work ute the two points will be suitable for the people who buy this pick-up.

Car 6. Mitsubishi Mirage

We didn’t test out the Mirage as we had previously put it to the test in our real mums review. Both Mirage variants (sedan and hatch) have two ISOFIX anchor points and comfortably fits 2 seats across the back. For a little car it certainly felt spacious even with 2 adults and 2 kids.

Car 7. Mitsubishi Pajero Sport

The Pajero Sport is one amazing vehicle and does a fabulous job of keeping you up high on the road and feeling safe as houses!

The Pajero Sport has 2 ISOFIX mounting points in the outboard seating positions and 3 child restraint anchorages in the roof.

The 60/40 split fold rear seat worked a treat for keeping master 4 in his seat but allowing room for bulkier/larger items to be loaded in the boot with ease.

The Pajero Sport is also fitted with child restraint compatible seatbelts or ALR [automatic locking restraint] seatbelts ensuring that once you’ve pulled them out all the way a lock is activated that only allows it retract. Great for ensuring the tension on the belts never increases!

Now, a couple of disclaimers about 3rd row seats. If you’ve got three child seats across the back, the only way to access the 6th and 7th seat is through the boot. Which is totally doable when you’re thirteen years old but probably not so easy if you’re forty plus. However, if you only have two child seats in the back, then the 6th and 7th seat is accessible from the back door and totally possible for grown-ups to sit there without throwing their hip out.

 

 

Summary

What WE learned from this exercise is that there needs to be a shift in thinking when considering family cars and child seats. Instead of buying a car to fit your seats perhaps flip it and buy a car to meet your needs [size, fuel economy, budget] and then tailor your child seats around that. We were amazed at the size range of child seats available which all meet Australian safety standards. Biggest does not always mean best and as you can see with some clever configuring [just like tetris!] many of the popular mid-size vehicles could safely accommodate three child seats across the back.

Disclaimer: Content is correct at date of publishing. Vehicle related content in this article refers to 16MY Mitsubishi Outlander, 15.5MY Mitsubishi ASX, 16MY Mitsubishi Pajero, 16MY Mitsubishi Triton, 16MY Mitsubishi Lancer, 16MY Mitsubishi Mirage and 16MY MItsubishi Pajero Sport. 

Sours: https://www.mitsubishi-motors.com.au/blog/review-kid-testing-mitsubishi-range.html
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BabyDrive Verdict

The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is a five-seater plug-in hybrid SUV. Using both petrol and battery power you can switch between the two at your will as well as choose to charge or save the battery range too, using buttons below the gear lever, in the central console.

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The difference between the PHEV and say the Toyota Rav4 hybrid, is that you can drive the PHEV much further on battery, including at motorway speeds, whereas you can't drive far or fast on electricity alone in a traditional hybrid like the Rav4 or Nissan Pathfinder etc.

The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV has a battery range of about 54km, which is enough for most peoples daily school run and commute, so if your commute includes some motorway driving then you can still use your battery and save on fuel.

I have assessed both the five-seater Outlander and the seven-seater Outlander before, so I know about their internal space and family practicality and nothing had changed there. I really wanted to see what this plug-in hybrid was going to be like to use as our daily family car and a BabyDrive! Let's find out:

The 54kms was plenty for our daily kindy drop off, pick up and commute. I charged the Outlander in the evening from our regular socket in the garage and it took about seven hours to fully charge. With a wall box, I am told it takes about three hours.

There is a handy visual on the media screen which tells you when you are using battery or engine power and what your range is.

The range for battery and petrol are also shown in front of your steering wheel, so you know exactly what you have left on both. What I found myself doing was using the battery for our daily lives around town and then when I had longer trips switching to both engine and battery.

I found the Outlander PHEV to be a lot quieter than the petrol or diesel models and to have a much smoother and more responsive ride.

Now for the family practicality, I previously tested the five-seater Mitsubishi Outlander LS and was impressed with how spacious it was and the situation is the same in the five-seat Outlander PHEV. Legroom is great in both rows and a 182cm driver can sit in front of a rear-facing child seat or you could have tall passengers in the front and the back.

The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is the same as the petrol and diesel Outlanders when it comes to fitting child seats.

There are three top tether anchorages across the rear seatbacks, they are within plastic guides but you can't attach the top tether clip the normal way; it will only attach from behind, which can make eliminating twists in your top tether strap difficult.

There are ISOFix points in the two outer rear seats too. When fitting child seats you need to consider the central seatbelt buckle and you definitely do not want to sit on it! It sticks up, on such a rigid stalk so you can not move whichever seat you have in the central seat beyond that point, which makes fitting more than two child seats almost impossible.

That said, I managed to squeeze these three child seats into the back row BUT no other combination of seats I tried would fit because of that central seatbelt buckle.

Another contributing factor is the seats have a hard plastic mechanism in each side of the base which means you can not move the child seats outwards any further or the child seats will not sit against the seat of the car.

If you really need to fit three child seats in the Mitsubishi Outlander then you would be best having lots of seats tested until you find three that will fit with these things in mind. Otherwise, it is a more practical two child seat car.

Boot space is really good in the Outlander PHEV and there are cup holders on top of the rear wheel arches!! These were obviously designed for the third-row passengers in seven-seater Outlanders but when they're not being used you have cup holders in the boot… AMAZING!!! I had somewhere to put my hot drink whilst I loaded the boot and strapped bub into her seat, then I could collect my cuppa and close the boot on my way to my driver's seat!

There are also really good plastic wells on either side of the boot behind the wheel arches which we found great for storing lunch boxes etc so they didn't move around the boot.

The boot of the Outlander PHEV would hold fifteen shopping bags when empty, which one more than the Toyota Rav4 that takes fourteen.

There is no spare wheel with the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV, which is a consideration, instead there is some good underfloor storage where the charging leads are kept.

Inside the cabin, the storage is quite minimal, the glove box has an extra shelf at the top which I found handy for popping the iPad in when we parked up.

There are two well-sized cup holders in the front and back for disposable and reusable coffee cups. The front door bins are a good size for holding large refillable water bottles, the rear door bins will only hold 600ml bottles and there are wells in the door handles.

The media system in the Outlander is basic and simple to use, it does have Apple CarPlay and Android Auto which is great! I did find the PHEV a very beepy car, with chimes and bells and ringing alarms for a lot of things like seatbelt when you first get in, having the driver's door open with the engine on, coming towards a red light or speed camera. All these things and more set off deafening tones that seemed even louder with the quieter PHEV.

The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is quite a pleasant car to drive around in and I very much enjoyed the quieter and smoother ride compared to petrol and diesel Outlanders. Driving my daughter to sleep using the battery alone and sitting with the aircon running while she napped and not using fuel was great.

The interior has a modern feel and the shiny black plastic which I am personally not a fan of, combined with the plain black leather made for a nice look.

Overall the five-seater Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is quite a practical everyday BabyDrive, the 54kms of battery range is enough for most daily commutes and drop off and great for day naps too. Being able to get up to motorway speeds on the battery is a great advantage of this plug-in hybrid over its traditional hybrid competitors and charging nightly at home was easy.

The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV has a five-star ANCAP safety rating in 2014 and has seven SRS airbags as standard.

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BabyDrive Indepth

BabyDrive Indepth - Storage

How good is the storage in the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV?

In the front, there are two large cup holders at the front of the central console big enough for disposable and reusable coffee cups.

The front door pockets are generous and will hold a large refillable water bottle but in the back, they are much smaller and would only hold 600ml bottles. There are little wells in the door handles too.

The central console box is small and the lid doubles as your armrest.

There is no glasses case in the ceiling of the Outlander PHEV model I tested however the bottom spec model does have one because there's no sunroof.

The glove box is considerately sized, there is a shelf in the top that will hold an iPad and my wallet fitted in the bottom with the manual.

I really liked this feature as you can keep the manual out of the way as lets face it we hardly ever use them so having them taking up most of the space in the main part of the glove box is rather silly! There was plenty of room in the main section of the glove box for an iPad, wallet, keys etc.

In the back, there are map pockets on the back of both front seats, they will hold but not conceal an iPad.

There is also a fold-down armrest in the central seat back with two more cup holders, well-sized to hold reusable and disposable coffee cups.

How big is the boot in the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV?

The great storage continues into the boot where the space is fantastic. With the boot empty you can get 15 shopping bags in it, that's one more than in the Toyota RAV4 hybrid.

The Mountain Buggy Duet twin stroller fitted with six shopping bags.

The boot space and its functionality are really important. I like to have a big boot space and little side wells or areas I can divide things into. So something I don’t want to move around while I’m driving such as Tulsi’s lunch bag or her wet swimming gear can be sectioned off in a little well where it’s not going to spill or get squashed by the rest of the things in the boot.

Hooks for securing shopping bags to are also favourites of mine, I like being able to secure the bag containing more fragile things like eggs so they don’t move around on the journey.

I measure the boot space in freezer shopping bags, prams and dogs. Not because I think all there is to a mum’s life is food shopping, prams and dogs. (Although it can feel like it sometimes!!) But because these are visually measurable items we can all associate with. For me, the car company boot measurement of litres is not an amount I can easily visualise and 400L in one car may differ in usability to that in another due to the configuration or shape of the space.

Our Britax Flexx tandem stroller would fit with five shopping bags.

Our Mountain Buggy Urban Jungle stroller would fit with seven shopping bags in as well.

The Mountain Buggy Nano compact stroller would fit, laying down, with ten shopping bags in as well.

Or you could fit a large dog in the boot.

The boot floor is nice and flat and carpeted with no large gaps, so you can do an emergency nappy change!

There is a large storage area on either side of the boot behind the wheel arches. On the right-hand side of the boot, you have a 12V socket and two cup holders.

There is no spare tyre in the Outlander PHEV, which is a consideration. There is underfloor storage for the charging cables.

BabyDrive Indepth - Noise

How noisy is the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV? How good is the media system and technology in the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV?

The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is quite a beepy car! One of the loudest alerts during our week of testing was for speed and red-light cameras. The distance to the camera comes up on the media screen and it keeps beeping to alert you!

The Outlander PHEV also beeps when you get in until the seatbelts are fastened which is frustrating because in the Australian climate you turn the ignition on to get the air-con going before you fasten your seatbelts so the ‘donging' does get a bit much!

The parking sensors in the Outlander PHEV are rather loud and all the alerts are definitely baby-waking! You can’t alter the volume of them but the parking sensors can be muted with a button by the driver's right knee which is good.

Becoming a parent I soon realised there are some noises and sounds I feel are unnecessary and I could happily live without if it meant my baby stayed asleep!!

That often the distraction of my screaming, distressed baby is more dangerous when driving than not having a lane departure warning for example.

If it is the lane departure warning beeping that creates distress with my baby then which is safest?

It’s where I think we need to be able to strike a balance and choose when we can mute the warnings or swap them to a vibration in the steering wheel or flashing light perhaps?

A lot of these noises come with the increase in technology and especially linked to safety features and alerts. For me these all have their place.

Another thing I have realised is I spend my time in a lot more places where small children roam, parks, beaches, play gyms, swimming lessons, daycare centre etc. I have become more aware that when I’m reversing or manouvering in the car parks I have to tripple check for small children running around behind me or being in my blind spot when reversing. For this I LOVE reversing cameras, I just don’t like their beeping sounds!!

I have become so much more aware of safety and potential accidents or hazards since having a child and so I love the peace of mind that I get from the cameras and sensors combined with my own vision from windows and mirrors as I don’t trust cameras alone.

The lane departure warning had a rather baby-waking sound too, you can’t alter the volume of but you can turn it on and off with a button, down by the driver's right knee too.

Some of these safety features are also features that drive me crazy as a mum! Like the lane departure and forward collision alert or the parking sensor beeping sound.
I want all the safety technology AND to be able to mute the sound when my daughter's asleep!

The indicator sound is lovely and quiet in the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV.

The Outlander PHEV media system has been updated. There is now built-in Sat-Nav in the Outlander PHEV which was an improvement from the earlier 2017 Outlander model I tested.

The media system is basic and simple to use and navigate and thankfully has Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

The opening of the windows of the Outlander opened and closed quite quietly and you can lock the doors and windows from the driver's door control panel.

The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is much quieter and smoother to drive than the petrol and diesel models I tested previously. The PHEV starts nice and quietly, I can drive my daughter to sleep using the 54km battery range and sit with the airconditioning running while she sleeps without burning fuel which is great. As well as going much further without needing the engine, this plug-in hybrid differs from traditional hybrids because it can travel at motorways speeds on battery power whereas others like the Toyota Rav4 switch to the engine above around 45km/h.

You can keep an easily see your battery and fuel range on the dashboard display.

Or there is a great visual of your usage within the media screen too. My daughter enjoys watching this while we are driving and spotting when we are using the battery or engine!

You can easily switch between battery and engine with buttons behind the gear lever and even choose to save or charge the battery too.

The Outlander PHEV has around 54km of battery range which we found was plenty for our daily kindy drop-offs and commute. I plugged the PHEV in most evenings to the regular plug in our garage and found it took about seven hours to fully charge the battery. If you have a wall box I am told it takes three hours. I found we used the battery every day for around town etc and used the fuel for longer trips at the weekends.

BabyDrive Indepth - Car Seats

How many child seats fit in the five-seater Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV?

With a rear-facing child seat installed in the second-row seats, legroom is really good and we could easily fit a 182cm driver in front. This isn't the case with the seven-seater Outlander though.

The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV has three top tether points on the back of the second-row seatbacks. They are within plastic guides but REALLY difficult to connect to.

The plastic casing is the wrong way around so you can not attach the tether hooks the usual way facing inwards, they'll only fit facing outwards and then I found it difficult to keep twists out of the top tether straps.

There are ISOFix anchor points in both of the outer seats in the second row, they are not within plastic guides but are quite easy to connect to.

The Outlander PHEV has the same issue with the central seatbelt buckle as the petrol and diesel models. The buckle sticks right up in the air above the seat on a rigid stem that you just can’t maneuver any child seat around. So when you try to put three child seats across it doesn't allow for any seat to move beyond it, meaning you can't distribute the space on the back seat and you definitely do not want to sit on it as a passenger!

I found I could only fit two child seats in the back seats with every combination of harnessed seats I tried. Only this combination with booster seats would allow me to fit three child seats but I would highly recommend you test all child seats before buying if you need to fit three across.

The height of the ceiling meant that posting bub into their child seats from outside and inside the car is fine.

Australia being a country of weather extremes- blazing sun and torrential rain, mean you may find it easier to put Bub into their seat from inside the car sometimes. If it’s hot you can get the air-con going, cool the car down and not stand out in the sun while you fasten them in or shelter from the rain and not get soaked yourself whilst you’re doing it. So it is important to test whether Bub can be easily installed from either direction!

BabyDrive Indepth - Drive & Comfort

How comfortable is the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV and how nice is the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV to drive?

I found the seats in the front of the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV quite comfortable,  however, I did find the top of the seats sloped away quite quickly and didn't provide much upper body support for long journeys. The seat base was not too long for my legs and I'm 162cm. The driver's seat had an electric adjustment and the passenger side manual adjustment. The seats are simple black leather, with minimal seams and detail so they would be easy to clean.

Although the headrests are not adjustable, I found I could have a ponytail whilst driving the Outlander!

I had spent hours styling my hair this morning to get this ponytail just right too… said no new mum ever!!!

The outer seats in the second row are comfortable but unfortunately, the middle seat is not because the seat belt buckle sticks right up in the air on a rigid stalk so you cannot bend it around your bottom or child seat base!

So it really renders the central seat useless! If it wasn't for the buckle the legroom for the central seat is good and only has a very low hump in the footwell so a passenger would not have to straddle it.

For the first year of Tulsi's life when we would go out as a family, if I wasn’t driving, I would travel in the back with Tulsi so it’s important to check the back seat comfort as you may be spending a lot of time there! Back seats were never something I gave any thought to before I had Tulsi but I definitely notice a good or bad back seat now!

The steering wheel was fully adjustable in/out and up/down.

The cruise control in the Outlander PHEV I found to be quite accurate driving on motorways and less so on undulating roads at 60km/h. The controls are situated on the right of the steering wheel and are simple and easy to use.

There are four air-conditioning vents across the front dashboard. A large one either side of the steering wheel and two smaller ones in front of the front passenger.

Located just below the media screen, the controls are easy to access and use whilst driving. The air conditioning used a lot of battery range and I found when I turned it off I gained a lot of kilometres.

There two vents in the back of the central console box for the rear passenger's comfort, which I found reachable while driving.

There is also a USB socket for the second-row passengers situated below the vents.

The rear windows are tinted and we didn’t find we needed to add window shades as well.

The visibility in the Outlander is very good, the windows are large and deep and being a five-seater there is only one row of child seats. There are handles above both rear doors well positioned to hang a child's toy form. The rear interior light was too far back for me to reach from the front.

I often will reach back to turn on the interior light if I am driving at night time, I find my little girl gets less distressed travelling at night that way. It helps if I can reach the interior light from the driver's seat so I can turn it on and off whilst driving. I often find my daughter will need it on as we start our journey in the dark but once she falls asleep I can turn it off.
It is also useful when there are lights situated above the doors where the handles are usually positioned. These are good for when putting a baby into their child seats when visibility is poor, so you do not have to reach across them to a light situated in the ceiling centrally etc.

There are carpet floor mats throughout the Outlander PHEV and are all removable making cleaning them easier.

The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is a quiet, smooth and responsive car to drive and quite enjoyable. It wasn't noisy up hills and it didn't struggle like the previous models I drove, see what I said about them below:

The five-seater 2WD Outlander was terrible to drive in the wet or wind and bad on bends. I did not feel confident and had to drive really cautiously. The engine was very noisy and didn’t feel powerful enough for most hills. The top-spec AWD diesel seven-seater Outlander doesn't feel the same, I think it's actually a nice drive on motorways and on slower, undulating roads. The engine is not as noisy either but the road noise is still quite prominent and I could feel the road surface through the floor of the footwell.

The interior is quite simple black leather and plastics, the dashboard does have a lot of shiny black plastic, which I'm not a fan of, but it would all wipe clean easily once sticky little kids fingers had fiddled with everything!!

BabyDrive Indepth - Safety

The Mitsubishi Outlander has rated a five-star ANCAP safety rating in 2014 before child occupancy protection was tested. Scoring 35.58 out of 37 overall in crash testing, 15.88 out of 16 for the frontal offset test and full marks; 16/16 in the side impact test and 2/2 for the pole test.

The Mitsubishi Outlander is equipped with seven SRS airbags as standard. Frontal driver and front passenger airbags and a knee airbag for the driver. As well as front passenger and driver side airbags. Front and rear passengers also have curtain airbags.

There is only seatbelt removal warning for the front driver and passenger seats, not back in the second and third rows where you would really want them as you can not see while driving.

The Mitsubishi Outlander Exceed that I tested comes with anti-lock braking system (ABS), electronic brakeforce distribution (EBD), emergency brake assist system (EBA), ultrasonic misacceleration mitigation system, emergency stop signal function (ESS), electronic stability control (ESC), active traction control (ATC), hill start assist (HSA), automatic high beam, adaptive cruise control (ACC), blind-spot warning (BSW), lane departure warning (LDW), lane keep assist (LKA), automatic dusk sensing headlamps, rear cross-traffic alert and front and rear parking sensors.

Some of these safety features are also features that drive me crazy as a mum! Like the lane departure and forward collision alert or the parking sensor beeping sound.
I want all the safety technology AND to be able to mute the sound when Tulsi’s asleep!

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Sours: https://babydrive.com.au/reviews/suvs/2020-mitsubishi-outlander-phev-exceed/
Mitsubishi Outlander XLS Cargo \u0026 3rd Row Seat
Chaps -

There is an option for you to think about if you want to fit 3 child seats or even 4 into the rear of a car.

See this website - http://www.multimac.co.uk/bmw_x3_child_seat

They connect to the exsiting ISOFIX and provide a soltion for cars which are a bit narrrow.

I have never used them but have provided a link a few times in the past.

Like with anything.. check your insurance if going down the 4 seats in the rear.

They are NOT cheap, however the cost to change cars or own a people carrier would more than likley be more.

plus there are harness too rather than a normal seat belt

Hope this helps.

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Sours: https://www.myoutlanderphev.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1197

Seats mitsubishi outlander 3 car

Mitsubishi Outlander


The lower anchors for 2D are overlapped into 2C making it such that a car seat installed with LATCH in 2D will block the use of 2C for anything else (car seat, booster or adult). Also, it is not possible to LATCH in a booster in 2D as the booster will sit on the buckle for 2D.

Sours: https://thecarseatlady.com/vehicles/suv/mitsubishi-outlander/
How we fit three car seats in one backseat

I tested the five-seater older model Mitsubishi Outlander LS previously and loved how spacious it was. I am always excited to get my hands on seven-seaters for Baby-Drive testing! So lets' see how the new seven-seater Mitsubishi Outlander Exceed model went in testing … My first impressions were, are you sure there's enough room in there for seven seats?

The sevens-seat Mitsubishi Outlander has three top tether points in the second row and they are within plastic guides but REALLY difficult to connect to because the plastic casing is the wrong way around so you can not attach the tether hooks the usual way.

There are ISOFix anchor points in both of the outer seats in the second row and though they are not within plastic guides but weren't too difficult to connect to. 

I found I could only fit two child seats in the second row. It's a real shame that Mitsubishi hasn't fixed the problem with the central seatbelt buckle, which sticks right up in the air above the seat on a rigid stem that meant I just couldn’t maneuver and any child seat I tried to put there. And you definitely do not want to sit on it! I installed the Britax Graphene rear facing and the Britax Platinum Pro forward facing. There are no top tethers or ISOFix in the third-row seats so I couldn't install child seats there. Legroom is also an issue in the seven-seater model; with a rear-facing child seat installed in the second-row there was 28cm of knee room for the front passenger but no room for the third-row passengers at all.

The third-row seats are pretty compact, with not much kick room under the second-row seats or legroom at all and the headroom was tight for me at only 162cm. So unlike its five-seater sibling, legroom is not the seven-seater's strong point!!

When you're only using five seats there are cup holders on top of the rear wheel arches!! These were obviously designed for the third-row passengers but when they're not being used you have cup holders in the boot… AMAZING!!! I had somewhere to put my hot drink whilst I loaded the boot and strapped bub into her seat, then I could collect my cuppa and close the boot on my way to my driver's seat!

Storage in the boot of the Outlander was quite good with five of the seven seats in use, it held 14 shopping bags from empty or all types of strollers fitted with good amounts of shopping bags beside them. Or you could get a large family dog in the boot.

When using all seven seats only four shopping bags would fit or the Mountain Buggy Nano compact stroller with two shopping bags.

Inside the cabin, the storage is average, the glove box has an extra shelf at the top which I found handy for popping the iPad when we parked up.

There are ample cup holders and general storage in all three rows throughout the car. The front door bins are a good size for holding large refillable water bottles, second-row passengers have smaller bins and third-row passengers both get big cup holders.

The media screen in the Outlander does have Apple CarPlay and Android Auto which is fantastic! It was easy to navigate, and you can mute the sat nav voice easily by touching the mute button on the media screen easily while you are driving.

I tested the top-spec seven-seater Outlander Exceed which I found actually really nice to drive. There was a bit of road surface noise and vibration through the floor of the car as if you could feel the surface of the road with your feet on the footwell floor. The interior was quite pleasant, although there is a fair bit of shiny black plastic in the central console and dash, which I am not a fan of but overall it felt modern and practical. The seats were minimal fuss black leather so easy to keep clean and the dash and doors would wipe clean easily too.

I did find the air conditioning really blowy and loud in the Outlander and even the lowest setting was far too strong to be comfortable.

Overall the seven-seater Outlander is a practical everyday five-seater BabyDrive, with the occasional use of the sixth and seventh seats in the third row. The media system is good and the drive is greatly improved in the all-wheel-drive diesel model I tested than it was in the two-wheel-drive petrol five-seater model I tested previously.

The Mitsubishi Outlander has a five-star ANCAP safety rating in 2014 and has seven SRS airbags as standard.

BabyDrive Indepth - Storage

In the front, there are two large cup holders at the front of the central console big enough for disposable and reusable coffee cups.

The front door pockets are large too and would hold my large refillable water bottle and my iPad, they are not lined though so anything smaller would rattle whilst driving.

The central console box is small and the lid doubles as your armrest.

There is no glasses case in the ceiling of the Outlander

The glove box is considerately designed, there is a shelf in the top of it that would hold an iPad or the manual giving you all the rest of the generously sized glove box for your storage.

I really liked this feature as you can keep the manual out of the way as lets face it we hardly ever use them so having them taking up most of the space in the main part of the glove box is rather silly! There was plenty of room in the main section of the glove box for an iPad, wallet, keys etc.

In the back, there are map pockets on the back of both front seats, they will hold but not conceal an iPad.

I found the rear door pockets very practically shaped and they would hold two 600ml bottles. I found they would hold all combinations of child and baby drink vessels; sippy cups, bottles with straws, baby bottle and up to large refillable water bottles. This was another great feature for BabyDrive!

There is also a fold-down armrest in the central seat back with two more cup holders, well sized for reusable and disposable coffee cups.

The great storage continues into the boot as well. There is plenty of room for a large dog when you are only using five seats. Or with the boot empty you can get 14 shopping bags in it.

The Mountain Buggy Duet twin stroller fitted with four shopping bags.

The boot space and its functionality are really important. I like to have a big boot space and little side wells or areas I can divide things into. So something I don’t want to move around while I’m driving such as Tulsi’s lunch bag or her wet swimming gear can be sectioned off in a little well where it’s not going to spill or get squashed by the rest of the things in the boot.

Hooks for securing shopping bags to are also favourites of mine, I like being able to secure the bag containing more fragile things like eggs so they don’t move around on the journey.

I measure the boot space in freezer shopping bags, prams and dogs. Not because I think all there is to a mum’s life is food shopping, prams and dogs. (Although it can feel like it sometimes!!) But because these are visually measurable items we can all associate with. For me, the car company boot measurement of litres is not an amount I can easily visualise and 400L in one car may differ in usability to that in another due to the configuration or shape of the space.

Our Britax Flexx tandem stroller would fit with five shopping bags.

Our Mountain Buggy Urban Jungle stroller would fit with five shopping bags in as well.

The Mountain Buggy Nano compact stroller would fit with ten shopping bags in as well.

When you are using all seven seats the boot is tiny, it would hold four shopping bags.

Or the Mountain Buggy Nano compact stroller would fit with two shopping bags in as well. No other strollers I tested would fit.

The retractable roller blind in the Outlander is really flimsy feeling and not great quality, I had the problem that when getting it into position it scratches the sides of the walls and is hard to manoeuvre.

When using five seats the boot floor is nice and flat and carpeted so you can do an emergency nappy change!

BabyDrive Indepth - Noise

The parking sensors in the Outlander are rather loud and potentially baby waking! You can’t alter the volume of them but they can be turned on and off with a button by the driver's right knee. When you turn it on it makes a ‘do-doh’ sound just to let you know it’s activated!

Becoming a parent I soon realised there are some noises and sounds I feel are unnecessary and I could happily live without if it meant my baby stayed asleep!!

That often the distraction of my screaming, distressed baby is more dangerous when driving than not having a lane departure warning for example.

If it is the lane departure warning beeping that creates distress with my baby then which is safest?

It’s where I think we need to be able to strike a balance and choose when we can mute the warnings or swap them to a vibration in the steering wheel or flashing light perhaps?

A lot of these noises come with the increase in technology and especially linked to safety features and alerts. For me these all have their place.

Another thing I have realised is I spend my time in a lot more places where small children roam, parks, beaches, play gyms, swimming lessons, daycare centre etc. I have become more aware that when I’m reversing or manouvering in the car parks I have to tripple check for small children running around behind me or being in my blind spot when reversing. For this I LOVE reversing cameras, I just don’t like their beeping sounds!!

I have become so much more aware of safety and potential accidents or hazards since having a child and so I love the peace of mind that I get from the cameras and sensors combined with my own vision from windows and mirrors as I don’t trust cameras alone.

The lane departure warning had a rather baby waking sound that you can’t alter the volume of but you can turn it on and off with a button down by the driver's right knee and you can turn the parking sensors off there too.

Some of these safety features are also features that drive me crazy as a mum! Like the lane departure and forward collision alert or the parking sensor beeping sound.
I want all the safety technology AND to be able to mute the sound when Tulsi’s asleep!

The indicator volume could not be altered in the Outlander but I found it was not disturbing for my bub.

The Outlander media system uses Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, there is no built-in Sat-Nav in the Outlander so I just used the satnav from my phone, which made muting the sat nav voice simple and easy to do with one press on the media screen.

I find on most journeys when I use sat nav I only need directions for the last part of the journey. I know how to get to the area I am going and then it’s just the exact address I need help with. Because I need to input the address before I head off I found myself on most occasions when you can’t mute the sat nav voice having to listen to all the directions, which disturbs your concentration, any conversation in the car at the time or more importantly my sleeping baby! So being able to mute the sat nav voice until you reach the part where you actually need it is gold!

The opening of the windows of the Outlander I found quite quiet but they do close with a bit of a thud. You can lock the doors and windows from the driver's door control panel.

This model Outlander is the top-spec all-wheel-drive diesel model, which had a much-improved drive and engine noise. I could, however, feel and hear the road surface through the floor in the footwells, especially on motorways. It was a huge improvement on the petrol two-wheel-drive five-seater Outlander I reviewed last year.

BabyDrive Indepth - Car Seats

With a rear facing child seat installed in the second-row seats, legroom is tricky! The second-row seats do slide, however, even with the second-row seat in it's furthest back position, there is only 28cm of knee room in front of a rear-facing child seat and no leg room for the third-row seats.

The Outlander seven-seat model has three top tether points in the second row. They are within plastic guides but REALLY difficult to connect to because the plastic casing is the wrong way around so you can not attach the tether hooks the usual way facing inwards, they'll only fit going outwards and they are difficult to disconnect too.

There are ISOFix anchor points in both of the outer seats in the second row, they are not within plastic guides but weren't too difficult to connect to.

It' a real shame that Mitsubishi hasn't fixed the problem with the central seatbelt buckle, it sticks right up in the air above the seat on a rigid stem that you just can’t maneuver and any child seat I tried to put there I couldn't because of it and you definitely do not want to sit on! There is a similar problem in the larger Mitsubishi Pajero Sport which has its own set of family-unfriendly issues!

This meant I could only fit two child seats in the second row. I installed the Britax Graphene rear facing and the Britax Platinum Pro forward facing.

There are no top tethers or ISOFix in the third-row seats so I couldn't install child seats there. When accessing the third row, I found you have to uninstall child seats in the second row to fold the seat back forward and cimb through. The second row seats do slide to adjust the leg room. The seats are on a 60:40 split and the kerb side of the car is the 60% of the split so you'd have to bring two seat backs forward to access the third row and remove any child seats or passengers in two seats to climb into the back.

Once you are in legroom is an issue in the seven-seater model, with a rear-facing child seat installed in the second-row there was 28cm of knee room for the front passenger but no room for the third-row passengers at all. The third-row seats were pretty compact, not much kick room under the second-row seats or legroom at all and the headroom was tight too and I'm only 162cm.

The height of the ceiling meant that posting bub into their child seats from inside the car is fine.

Australia being a country of weather extremes- blazing sun and torrential rain, mean you may find it easier to put Bub into their seat from inside the car sometimes. If it’s hot you can get the air-con going, cool the car down and not stand out in the sun while you fasten them in or shelter from the rain and not get soaked yourself whilst you’re doing it. So it is important to test whether Bub can be easily installed from either direction!

Posting bub into her rear facing child seat from outside the Outlander was good too! The door openings are really big, making it nice and easy to post bub into her seat. There’s ample room to feed bub in the second row of seats if you only have one child seat installed.

BabyDrive Indepth - Drive & Comfort

The seats in the front of the Outlander are quite comfortable,  however, I do feel the back rest is angled wrong and is tipping me out of my seat towards the door slightly so I couldn't sit straight. The seat base was not too long for my legs and I'm 162cm. The front seats have electric adjustment and were simple black leather, with minimal seams and detail so they would be easy to clean.

I found I could have a ponytail whilst driving the Outlander!

I had spent hours styling my hair this morning to get this ponytail just right too… said no new mum ever!!!

The outer seats in the second row are comfortable too but the middle seat is not because the seat belt buckle sticks right up in the air on a rigid stalk so you cannot bend it around your bottom or child seat base! So it really renders the central seat useless! If it wasn't for the buckle the legroom for the central seat is good and only has a very low hump in the footwell so a passenger would not have to straddle it.

For the first year of Tulsis life when we would go out as a family, if I wasn’t driving, I would travel in the back with Tulsi so it’s important to check the back seat comfort as you may be spending a lot of time there! Back seats were never something I gave any thought to before I had Tulsi but I definitely notice a good or bad back seat now!

The second-row seat base slides to help ditribute the legroom.

The steering wheel was fully adjustable in/out and up/down.

The cruise control in the Outlander I found to be quite accurate, especially driving on motorways. The controls are situated on the right of the steering wheel and are very basic but easy to use.

There are four air-conditioning vents in the front of the cab. Two large ones in front of the driver and two smaller ones in front of the front passenger. The controls are easy to access and use whilst driving, centrally located below the media screen. I found the air conditioning very blowy, even on the lowest fan setting it was too strong!

There are also two vents in the back of the central console box, which are reachable by the driver to adjust them while driving.

There is also a USB for the second-row passengers situated below the vents.

The rear windows are tinted and we didn’t find we needed to add window shades as well.

The visibility in the Outlander is excellent, especially as you can only install two child seats. The windows are large and deep so passengers get a good view out too. Rear-facing passengers can see out of the rear windows well because they are very deep. This good visibility makes the Outlander easy to park and maneuver, the side mirrors are nice and big too helping with visibility when reversing. There are handles on both sides in the back that are well positioned for hanging a child’s toy from to keep little passengers amused.

Both vanity mirrors in the front are lit and there are interior lights in the ceiling in the front, above the opening of the boot and in the central ceiling above the second row of seats. I found this positioning difficult as I could not reach the light easily at night when putting Tulsi in or out of the car and I couldn’t reach it from the driver's seat.

I often will reach back to turn on the interior light if I am driving at night time, I find my little girl gets less distressed travelling at night that way. It helps if I can reach the interior light from the driver's seat so I can turn it on and off whilst driving. I often find my daughter will need it on as we start our journey in the dark but once she falls asleep I can turn it off.
It is also useful when there are lights situated above the doors where the handles are usually positioned. These are good for when putting a baby into their child seats when visibility is poor, so you do not have to reach across them to a light situated in the ceiling centrally etc.

There is a 12V plug sockets in the boot of the Outlander, handy for the plug-in Esky when camping.

There are floor mats throughout the Outlander and they are all removable making cleaning easier.

The five-seater 2WD Outlander was terrible to drive in the wet or wind and bad on bends. I did not feel confident and had to drive really cautiously. The engine was very noisy and didn’t feel powerful enough for most hills. This top-spec AWD diesel Outlander doesn't feel the same, I think it's actualy a nice drive on motorways and on slower, undulating roads. The engine is not as noisy either but the road noise is still quite prominant and I could feel the road surface through the floor of the footwell.

The interior was much nicer in this top-spec model too, the dashboard was not full of plastic blanks and it was quite pleasant. There was still lots of shiny black plastic but it would all wipe clean easily once sticky little kids fingers had fiddled with everything!!

BabyDrive Indepth - Safety

The Mitsubishi Outlander was rated a five-star ANCAP safety rating in 2014. Scoring 35.58 out of 37 overall in crash testing, 15.88 out of 16 for the frontal offset test and full marks; 16/16 in the side impact test and 2/2 for the pole test.

The Mitsubishi Outlander  is equipped with seven SRS airbags as standard. Frontal driver and front passenger airbags and a knee airbag for the driver. As well as front passenger and driver side airbags. Front and rear passengers also have curtain airbags.

There is only seatbelt removal warning for the ront driver and passenger seats, not back in the second and third rows where you would really want them as you can not see while driving.

The Mitsubishi Outlander Exceed that I tested comes with anti-lock braking system (ABS), electronic brakeforce distribution (EBD), emergency brake assist system (EBA), ultrasonic misacceleration mitigation system, emergency stop signal function (ESS), electronic stability control (ESC), active traction control (ATC), hill start assist (HSA), automatic high beam, adaptive cruise control (ACC), blind spot warning (BSW), lane departure warning (LDW), lane keep assist (LKA), automatic dusk sensing headlamps, rear cross traffic alert and front and rear parking sensors.

Some of these safety features are also features that drive me crazy as a mum! Like the lane departure and forward collision alert or the parking sensor beeping sound.
I want all the safety technology AND to be able to mute the sound when Tulsi’s asleep!

Sours: https://babydrive.com.au/reviews/suvs/2018-mitsubishi-outlander-7-seater/

Now discussing:

I didn't want to move, the situation itself was tense, the penetration was dense, and it seemed one movement and the trio would discharge a powerful orgasm. Nika was the first to give a sign, she squeezed the guys' hands, which meant: do not move. Oddly enough, they understood her. And then, slowly, Nika began to move upward, as if sliding off the two stakes on which she was planted.

Feeling that one of them was about to come out of her, she, just as slowly began to move down, reaching the end, she accelerated the movement up, and then down.



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