Personification activities for middle school

Personification activities for middle school DEFAULT
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Personification Lesson by Debbie Aubert


Kansas State Reading/Writing Standards Addressed: Reading (identifies and determines meaning of figurative language; Writing (practices selecting words that are suitable and precisely create appropriate imagery)

Specific Objectives: The student will:

~tell what personification is

~look at given sentences and describe the object being personified

~write simple sentences using personification

Anticipatory Set: Read the book The Three Little Pigs to the students. After reading the story ask the students to think about the pigs and the wolf and discuss what they do that normal pigs and wolves don't do. Tell them these are examples of personification.

Step by Step Procedure: Day One

1. Read the book The Three Little Pigs to the students as described in the anticipatory set.

2. Write the definition of personification on the board (Personification is giving human characteristics to everyday ideas, objects, and animals.)

3. Re-examine some of the ideas given during the anticipatory set and ask why they are examples of personification.

4. Pass out the handout of sentences containing examples of personification and have students work in cooperative groups. Tell them to underline the object, animal, or idea being personified. They will circle what they're doing that makes it an example of personification.

5. Allow time for students to complete this activity, and then go over each sentence asking different students to give the example of personification in each sentence.

Step by Step Procedure: Day Two

1. Ask students if they remember the definition of personification from yesterday's lesson.

2. Begin writing nouns on the chalkboard such as monkey, tree, wind, snow, sky, leaf. Ask students to help you expand this list until you have about 20 nouns on the board. In another column on the board, write some verbs such as whispered, smiled, laughed. Ask students to also help you expand this list until you have about 20 verbs.

3. Tell students that they're going to write ten of their own sentences using personification. You will write a couple of examples on the board such as: The leaf danced across the sky on its journey away from the tree .

4, Remind them to make use of prepositional phrases, adjective, adverbs, and other parts of speech learned to make their sentences exciting. Let students share their work if they wish to.

Independent Practice:

Students will write ten sentences as described in Day 2 Step by Step Procedure.

Closure: At the end of day 2, ask students if they have any questions about personification. Ask someone to once again give the definition of personification. Ask students if they liked hearing the sentences that their classmates wrote, and then ask them why. Tell them that using figurative language like personification helps to make our writing much more fun to read.

Assessment: none required until the end of the figurative language unit

Modifications: The number of sentences could be cut down for those students that need modification, as it's the quality we're looking for, not the quantity. Other modifications could be made if required by an IEP.

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Personification Worksheet


Name_________________________________

Directions: Underline the idea, object, animal being personified and circle what they're doing that makes it an example of personification.


1. The sun danced across the sky on the hot summer day.


2. The big full moon guided me through the forest.


3. The mountain listened to the rumbles beneath its surface.


4. As the rain pounded to the ground, everyone ran for cover.


5. The old man sat at the edge of the sea as the waves crashed on the shore.


6. The old car groaned as it made its way down the long open road.


7. The wind whispered lonely sounds as it blew through the old creaky windows.


8. The leaves raced to the ground as the children ran across the playground.


9. The pencil moaned as the boy turned the handle on the pencil sharpener.


The tornado pranced across the field and wiped away everything in its path.

Sours: https://teachers.net/lessons/posts/html

Games to Play to Teach Personification in Middle School

Personification is the act of “giving human characteristics to something that is not human.” Once your middle school students understand this concept, they might be surprised how often they recognize its use as a descriptive device in literature. Classroom games can reinforce students' understanding and recognition of this figurative literary device.

1Live Cartoons!

Gather together some clips from various cartoons that employ personification. Bugs Bunny, Mickey Mouse, Sponge Bob, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and stories about objects like “The Brave Little Toaster” would all work. Show your class the clips and ask them each to write down one character that they’d like to portray in a skit. Have each student make a list of all the ways that the chosen animal or object is personified. How do they dress and speak? What’s their personality like? Once they’ve created their characters, have the students, in groups of two or three, create skits in which the personified characters interact.

2Personification Jeopardy

Collect some poetry (or write your own!) that describes objects, ideas or animals personification. For example, you might describe how "bright and shining, but ever-changing in size and visibility" an unnamed object is. When you read this description, have students raise their hands or “buzz in” to answer with the question, as in Jeopardy, “What is the moon?” Make sure to collect a wide range of objects, animals and ideas (Time, for example, can be a cruel taskmaster) to describe as answers through personification. You could keep score and declare a winner of your Personification Jeopardy or just play for the fun and learning experience.

3Group Personification Story

Have everyone sit in a circle. Begin by choosing one an animal or object about which to create a group story. If, for example, "a chair" is selected, begin the story with a phrase like, "One day there was a very lonely chair." One by one, each student continues the story, adding new personification aspects. (You might assist them with "How did the chair feel about that?" or "What did the chair do next?") Encourage the students to continue to develop the adventures of whatever object or animal they are describing until all in the circle have added a piece of the story.

4Personification Scavenger Hunt

This exercise allows students to work in groups. Have them divide into teams of three or four. Tell them that you will give them a set amount of time to search through all the materials in the room for examples of personification. Tell them that once they select a resource, to be fair to everyone, they will only have five minutes to look through that resource before returning it to its place. Remind them that they must also take note of what resource in which they found their examples. As in a traditional scavenger hunt, the team with the most correct finds wins.

Sours: https://classroom.synonym.com/games-teach-personification-middle-schoolhtml
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Brought to life with Personification!

I will now ask the students to move into their reading groups.  The students are placed in ability leveled reading groups to allow for differentiation with the product and process of the literature groups.

I will ask the students to prepare for reading by taking out our novel work.  This includes our Reading Response Guide, as well as our Seedfolks Character Analysis handout.  I will allow 5 minutes for the group to check their work to make sure everyone in the group is caught up and ready to go for today.  During this time, I will walk around to monitor progress and assess who is keeping up and who is falling behind.  I can then determine what intervention is needed to assist these students. 

Next, we will read the next two chapters "Curtis" and "Maricela" aloud.  As I read, I am still modeling how I annotate the text.  This guidance is still needed, however, I will begin to pull back from asking the students after I read a paragraph if there is anything I should annotate.  This releases the responsibility of identifying important text to them.  By calling on them, it will model thinking at their level using their peers ideas. I will remind the students to annotate for personification as well as.  As we learn and review these literary devices, it is important to apply the skill and practice whenever we can.  

Once we have read the two chapters, I will have the students work in their groups to complete their daily work, practicing their discussion skills.  This developing skill allows them a chance to share their thoughts and ideas.

Every day we read, I pick a focus for reading.  Today, I will have the students work on pulling out examples of character traits.  They will discuss one of the characters from the text and use the evidence to determine character traits.  In the Literature Group Discussion you will see three students discussing the character Sae Young.  They determine what has motivated her and the choices she makes.  

 

Sours: https://betterlesson.com/lesson//brought-to-life-with-personification
Figurative Language- Personification

Personification Worksheets

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L &#; Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and nuances in word meanings.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.La &#; Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors (e.g., as pretty as a picture) in context.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.Lb &#; Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.La &#; Interpret figurative language, including similes and metaphors, in context.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.Lb &#; Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.La &#; Interpret figures of speech (e.g., personification) in context.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.La &#; Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological allusions) in context.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.La &#; Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.La &#; Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.La &#; Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.

Sours: https://www.ereadingworksheets.com/figurative-language/figurative-language-worksheets/personification-worksheets/

School middle personification for activities

Personification Games and Activities

Personification is one of those things that's easier to show by example than to explain indirectly. Without an example, the whole thing sounds very strange. Pretending that something nonhuman is a human? What does that look like? So this topic, even more than others, can be much easier to understand through examples, activities, and games. Games and activities are also more fun and engaging for students. So, however you look at it, including games and activities in your classroom when teaching personification is a great idea. Here are some possible games and activities you can try.

Personifying Sentences

For this game, give each group of students a bag full of small slips of paper, each with a sentence that does not contain a personification. The goal is for students to turn those sentences into ones that have personification. For example, if the sentence reads, ''The chair was in the corner of the room, a long way from the table,'' a student might rewrite it to say, ''The lonely chair sat sadly in the corner of the room, missing the table and other chairs.''

Have each group remove one sentence from the bag at a time and attempt to rewrite it. Each student should note down their group's answer when they are done. You can make this into a competition by having groups compete to be the first to personify all of the sentences. You can even have groups present their favorite personification, and have students vote on which they find the most entertaining.

Random Personifications Game

For this game, instead of having students draw sentences from a bag, they draw individual items you might find around the classroom. They must then create a sentence which personifies that item. This can be done as a group competition, where each group takes turns to pick an item out of the bag, and come up with a sentence that personifies that item. If you approve of the sentence, you can award them with a point. The group with the most points wins.

Cartoon Personification

While personification in adult fiction might only be an occasional thing, it is everywhere in childrens' fiction, and especially on television in the form of cartoons. One way to get students to get excited about personification is to highlight the examples in the cartoons and TV programs that they watch or have seen. Start by providing some examples from SpongeBob SquarePants, a personified sponge, to Scooby Doo, a personified dog. Then have your students come up with as many examples of personification in cartoon form as they can.

The activity can be expanded by having students come up with their own cartoon characters based on personifications. What character traits would a personified toaster have? How about a personified trash can? You can take this as far as you'd like, from designing characters, to sketching them, to even writing a story or comic strip about them. There's a lot of fun that students can have with cartoon personification.

Sours: https://study.com/academy/lesson/personification-games-activities.html
Personification in Song Lyrics

Personification Worksheets

Personification Worksheets

The use of personification in poetry or literature is common. Personification is the attributing of human characteristics, thoughts or emotions to something that is non-human. A good example of this is the white rabbit in “Alice in Wonderland” who talks and wears a watch. Personification may also be used briefly in a sentence or phrase, such as “the sun shone happily after the rain.” These personification practice worksheets are free for you to print and use in your classroom or at home.

Helpful Definitions and Examples

What is Personification?
Personification Examples

Printable Personification Worksheet Activities

Bio Poem: An Ocean

Bio Poem: An Ocean

Have your students get creative by writing a bio poem about an ocean.

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, Grades K
CCSS Code(s):
W, W

Explain the Personification

Explain the Personification

Time to interpret some personification examples!

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, Grades K
CCSS Code(s):
LA

Figurative Language: Edgar Allen Poe&#;s &#;The Bells&#;

Figurative Language: Edgar Allen Poe&#;s &#;The Bells&#;

This Poe poem has a variety of different figures of speech to analyze.

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, Grades K
CCSS Code(s):
L, L, L

Figurative Language: What Is It?

Figurative Language: What Is It?

This multiple choice worksheet asks your student to identify the type of figurative language used in the sentence or phrase.

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, Grades K
CCSS Code(s):
LA

Personification – Is It or Isn’t It?

Personification – Is It or Isn’t It?

In this worksheet, your student will identify which passages use personification and which do not.

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, Grades K
CCSS Code(s):
LA

Personification in Literature

Personification in Literature

This worksheet has examples of personification in literature for your student to analyze.

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, Grades K
CCSS Code(s):
LA, RL

Using Personification

Using Personification

Your student is asked to write sentences using personification in this worksheet.

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, Grades K
CCSS Code(s):
LA

Warm Up to Personification!

Warm Up to Personification!

When you give human traits to something that is not human it is called personification. The tall tree stood guard at the gate is an example of personification. Here is a worksheet you can print out to familiarize students with what personification is and help them identify it in sentences, Free and printable, it is a great addition to any classroom.

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, Grades K
CCSS Code(s):
LA

Working with Figurative Language

Working with Figurative Language

In this worksheet your student will match up the figures of speech with the phrase or sentence.

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, Grades K
CCSS Code(s):
LA

Writing with Personification

Writing with Personification

Personification is the focus of this figurative language worksheet.

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, Grades K
CCSS Code(s):
LA
Sours: https://www.k12reader.com/subject/figurative-language-worksheets/personification/

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I understand everything, so there will be no tin, disrespect, we will also thank you for agreeing and appearing in our life. I think so too, - said Lena. - Thank you, Dima.



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