Red and white capsule amoxicillin

Red and white capsule amoxicillin DEFAULT

Ampicillin, Oral Capsule

Highlights for ampicillin

  1. Ampicillin oral capsule is available as a generic drug only.
  2. Ampicillin also comes as an oral suspension as well as in an intravenous form, which is only given by a healthcare provider.
  3. Ampicillin oral capsule is used to treat infections that are caused by certain types of bacteria.

Important warnings

  • Prescription completion warning:Finish all of your medication as prescribed by your doctor. Don’t stop taking your drug or skip doses if you start to feel better. Doing so could make your infection last longer. You could also become resistant to the drug. That means if you get another bacterial infection, ampicillin may not work to treat it.
  • Diarrhea warning:This drug may cause diarrhea. Call your doctor if you have bloody or watery diarrhea with or without stomach cramps and fever after you stop taking this drug.

What is ampicillin?

Ampicillin oral capsule is a prescription drug that’s only available in a generic form. Ampicillin also comes as an oral suspension and in an intravenous (IV) form, which is only given by a healthcare provider.

Why it’s used

Ampicillin is used to treat infections that are caused by certain types of bacteria. Ampicillin may be used as part of a combination therapy. This means you may need to take it with other medications.

How it works

Ampicillin belongs to the drug class penicillins. A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way. These drugs are often used to treat similar conditions.

Ampicillin works by killing bacteria to stop the infection from growing in your body.

Ampicillin side effects

Ampicillin oral capsule doesn’t cause drowsiness, but it can cause other side effects.

More common side effects

The more common side effects of ampicillin oral capsule can include:

  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • rash

If these effects are mild, they may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. If they’re more severe or don’t go away, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Serious side effects

Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency. Serious side effects and their symptoms can include the following:

  • Allergic reactions. Symptoms can include:
    • flu-like symptoms, such as fever and body aches
    • painful red or purple rash that spreads
    • blisters that could lead to skin breakdown
  • Diarrhea that lasts after you stop taking the drug. Symptoms can include:
    • diarrhea with or without stomach cramps
    • diarrhea with a fever

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible side effects. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always discuss possible side effects with a healthcare provider who knows your medical history.

Ampicillin may interact with other medications

Ampicillin oral capsule can interact with other medications, vitamins, or herbs you may be taking. An interaction is when a substance changes the way a drug works. This can be harmful or prevent the drug from working well.

To help avoid interactions, your doctor should manage all of your medications carefully. Be sure to tell your doctor about all medications, vitamins, or herbs you’re taking. To find out how this drug might interact with something else you’re taking, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Examples of drugs that can cause interactions with ampicillin oral capsule are listed below.

Interactions that increase your risk of side effects

Increased side effects from ampicillin: Taking ampicillin with certain medications raises your risk of side effects from ampicillin. This is because the amount of ampicillin in your body may be increased. Examples of these drugs include:

  • Probenecid
    • Taking this drug with ampicillin can cause more side effects. These can include severe nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.
  • Allopurinol
    • This drug increases the risk of skin rash when you take it with ampicillin.

Interactions that can make your drugs less effective

When ampicillin is less effective: When you take ampicillin with certain antibiotics, it may not work as well to treat your condition. This is because these antibiotics stop the growth of bacteria, and ampicillin needs bacteria to grow in order to kill them. Examples of these drugs include:

  • Chloramphenicol, macrolides, sulfonamides, and tetracyclines

When other drugs are less effective: When certain drugs are used with ampicillin, they may not work as well. This is because the amount of these drugs in your body may be decreased. Examples include:

  • Oral contraceptives (birth control pills)
    • Your doctor may prescribe a different form of birth control for you.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs interact differently in each person, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible interactions. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always speak with your healthcare provider about possible interactions with all prescription drugs, vitamins, herbs and supplements, and over-the-counter drugs that you are taking.

Ampicillin warnings

This drug comes with several warnings.

Allergies

Ampicillin can cause a severe allergic reaction. Symptoms can include:

  • rash
  • trouble breathing
  • swelling of your throat or tongue

If you have an allergic reaction, call your doctor or local poison control center right away. If your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room. Do not take this drug again if you’ve ever had an allergic reaction to it. Taking it again could be fatal.

Warnings for people with certain health conditions

For people with gonorrhea and syphilis: This drug alone won’t treat syphilis. You must receive an injectable dose of penicillin if you have gonorrhea and syphilis.

For people with diabetes: This drug may cause a false positive when your doctor tests you for glucose (sugar) in your urine. That means the test may say you have glucose in your urine when you really don’t. Ask your doctor if this drug is safe for you.

For people with kidney problems: If you have kidney problems or a history of kidney disease, you may not be able to clear this drug from your body well. This may increase the levels of drug in your body and cause more side effects.

Warnings for other groups

For pregnant women: Ampicillin is a category B pregnancy drug. That means two things:

  1. Research in animals has not shown a risk to the fetus when the mother takes the drug.
  2. There aren’t enough studies done in humans to show if the drug poses a risk to the fetus.

Talk to your doctor if you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Animal studies do not always predict the way humans would respond. Therefore, this drug should only be used in pregnancy if clearly needed.

Call your doctor right away if you become pregnant while taking this drug.

For women who are breastfeeding: Ampicillin may pass into breast milk and cause side effects in a child who is breastfed. Talk to your doctor if you breastfeed your child. You may need to decide whether to stop breastfeeding or stop taking this medication.

For seniors: The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects.

For children: Newborns and infants should take the lowest dosage of this drug possible. This is because their kidneys aren’t fully developed. It may take longer for this drug to be removed from their bodies. This means it can cause more side effects.

How to take ampicillin

This dosage information is for ampicillin oral capsule. All possible dosages and drug forms may not be included here. Your dosage, drug form, and how often you take the drug will depend on:

  • your age
  • the condition being treated
  • how severe your condition is
  • other medical conditions you have
  • how you react to the first dose

The dosage information below is for the conditions that this drug is most often prescribed to treat. This list may not contain all conditions that your doctor can prescribe this drug for. If you have questions about your prescription, talk with your doctor.

Forms and strengths

Generic: Ampicillin

  • Form: oral capsule
  • Strengths: 250 mg, 500 mg

Dosage for genitourinary tract infections or gonorrhea

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

For genitourinary tract infections other than gonorrhea:

  • Typical dosage is 500 mg four times per day.
  • Severe or chronic infections may require larger doses.

For gonorrhea:

  • Typical dosage is 3.5 grams once, with 1 gram of probenecid.

Child dosage (children who weigh more than 20 kg)

For genitourinary tract infections other than gonorrhea:

  • Typical dosage is 500 mg four times per day.

Child dosage (children who weigh 20 kg or less)

For genitourinary tract infections:

  • Typical dosage is 100 mg/kg per day in four equally divided and spaced doses.

For gonorrhea:

  • Typical dosage is 3.5 grams as a single dose.

Child dosage (children who weigh less than 20 kg)

For genitourinary tract infections:

  • Typical dosage is 100 mg/kg per day in four equally divided and spaced doses.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects.

Your doctor may start you on a lowered dosage or a different schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

Dosage for respiratory tract infections

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

  • Typical dosage is 250 mg four times per day.

Child dosage (children ages 0–17 years who weigh more than 20 kg)

  • Typical dosage is 250 mg four times per day.

Child dosage (children ages 0–17 years who weigh 20 kg or less)

  • Typical dosage is 50 mg/kg per day in equally divided and spaced doses three to four times per day.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects.

Your doctor may start you on a lowered dosage or a different schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

Dosage for gastrointestinal tract infections

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

  • Typical dosage is 500 mg four times per day.
  • Typical dosage is 500 mg four times per day.

Child dosage (children who weigh more than 20 kg)

  • Typical dosage is 500 mg four times per day.

Child dosage (children who weigh 20 kg or less)

  • Typical dosage is 100 mg/kg per day in four equally divided and spaced doses.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects.

Your doctor may start you on a lowered dosage or a different schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

Dosage for meningitis

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

Your doctor will decide the dosage that’s right for you.

Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

Your child’s doctor will decide the dosage that’s right for your child.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects.

Your doctor may start you on a lowered dosage or a different schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this list includes all possible dosages. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always speak with your doctor or pharmacist about dosages that are right for you.

Take as directed

Ampicillin oral capsule is used for short-term treatment. It comes with serious risks if you don’t take it as prescribed.

If you stop taking the drug suddenly or don’t take it at all: Your bacterial infection may not get better. It may even get worse.

If you miss doses or don’t take the drug on schedule: Your medication may not work as well or may stop working completely. For this drug to work well, a certain amount needs to be in your body at all times.

Finish all of your medication that your doctor prescribes. Don’t stop taking your drug or skip doses if you start to feel better. Doing so could make your infection last longer. You could also become resistant to the drug. This means that if you get another bacterial infection, ampicillin may not work to treat it.

If you take too much: You could have dangerous levels of the drug in your body. Symptoms of an overdose of this drug can include upset stomach and diarrhea.

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor or local poison control center. If your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

What to do if you miss a dose: Take your dose as soon as you remember. But if you remember just a few hours before your next scheduled dose, take only one dose. Never try to catch up by taking two doses at once. This could result in dangerous side effects.

How to tell if the drug is working: The symptoms of your infection will get better.

Important considerations for taking ampicillin

Keep these considerations in mind if your doctor prescribes ampicillin oral capsule for you.

General

  • Don’t take this drug with food.
  • Take this drug with 8 oz. of water 30 minutes before eating or two hours after eating.

Storage

  • Store the capsules at room temperature between 68°F and 77°F (20°C and 25°C).
  • Store them away from light.

Refills

A prescription for this medication is refillable. You should not need a new prescription to refill this medication. Your doctor will write the number of refills authorized on your prescription.

Travel

When traveling with your medication:

  • Always carry your medication with you. When flying, never put it into a checked bag. Keep it in your carry-on bag.
  • Don’t worry about airport X-ray machines. They can’t hurt your medication.
  • You may need to show airport staff the pharmacy label for your medication. Always carry the original prescription-labeled box with you.
  • Don’t put this medication in your car’s glove compartment or leave it in the car. Be sure to avoid doing this when the weather is very hot or very cold.

Clinical monitoring

Your doctor will likely monitor certain health issues during your treatment. This can help make sure you stay safe while you take this drug. These issues include:

  • Kidney function. Your doctor may do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working. If your kidneys don’t work well, your doctor may reduce how often you take this drug.
  • Liver function. Your doctor may do blood tests to check how well your liver is working. If your liver doesn’t work well, your doctor may lower your dosage of this drug.
  • Blood cell counts. Your doctor may do blood tests to check if this drug is reducing your red blood cell and platelet levels. If it is, your doctor may lower your dosage or stop your treatment with the drug.
  • Syphilis. If you have gonorrhea, your doctor will also test for you for syphilis. They’ll do this when you start the drug and then again three months later. This is because treatment for gonorrhea can mask symptoms of syphilis.

Are there any alternatives?

There are other drugs available to treat your condition. Some may be better suited for you than others. Talk to your doctor about other drug options that may work for you.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.

Sours: https://www.healthline.com/health/drugs/ampicillin-oral-capsule

RECENT MAJOR CHANGES

Amoxicillin is a semisynthetic antibiotic, an analog of ampicillin, with a broad spectrum of bactericidal activity against many gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. Chemically, it is (2S,5R,6R)-6-[(R)-(-)-2-amino-2-(p-hydroxyphenyl)acetamido]-3,3-dimethyl-7-oxo-4-thia-1-azabicyclo[3.2.0]heptane-2-carboxylic acid trihydrate. The structural formula is:

Chemical Structure

C16H19N3O5S•3H2O M.W. 419.45

Amoxicillin Capsules USP

Each capsule, for oral administration, contains 250 mg or 500 mg amoxicillin as the trihydrate.

Inactive Ingredients: CAPSULES-DRUG PRODUCT: magnesium stearate, talc.

CAPSULE SHELL AND PRINT CONSTITUENTS: black iron oxide, D&C Yellow #10, D&C Yellow #10 Aluminum Lake, FD&C Blue #1 Aluminum Lake, FD&C Blue #2 Aluminum Lake, FD&C Red #40, FD&C Red #40 Aluminum Lake, gelatin, propylene glycol, shellac, titanium dioxide. In addition, the 500 mg capsule shell may also contain methylparaben, potassium hydroxide, propylparaben, and sodium lauryl sulfate; and the 250 mg capsule shell contains D&C Red #28 and FD&C Blue #1.

Amoxicillin for Oral Suspension USP

After mixing, each 5 mL of amoxicillin suspension, for oral administration, will contain 125 mg or 250 mg of amoxicillin as the trihydrate.

Inactive Ingredients: SUSPENSION: FD&C Red #40, mixed berry flavoring, silicon dioxide, sodium benzoate, sodium citrate, sucrose, and xanthan gum.

Amoxicillin Tablets USP (Chewable)

Each chewable tablet, for oral administration, contains 125 mg or 250 mg of amoxicillin as the trihydrate.

Inactive Ingredients: CHEWABLE TABLETS: cherry flavor, lactose anhydrous, magnesium stearate, mannitol, microcrystalline cellulose, sodium citrate, and sucrose.

Sours: https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?setid=3bf1718a-fedc-4834-831e-b3b044f80ee6
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AMOXICILLIN

What does AMOXICILLIN look like?

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Note: Multiple images may be displayed for medicines available in different strengths, sold under different brand names, or manufactured by different pharmaceutical companies.

Amoxicillin 500mg Capsule
Amoxicillin 500mg Capsule

Strength: 500 MG

Pill Imprint: 93 3109 93 3109

Color: Beige

Shape: Capsule

Amoxicillin 500mg Capsule
Amoxicillin 500mg Capsule

Strength: 500 MG

Pill Imprint: A 45

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Amoxicillin 500mg Capsule
Amoxicillin 500mg Capsule

Strength: 500 MG

Pill Imprint: AA 825

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Sours: https://www.wellrx.com/amoxicillin/drug-images/
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amoxicillin

What is the most important information I should know about amoxicillin?

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to any penicillin antibiotic.

What is amoxicillin?

Amoxicillin is a penicillin antibiotic that is used to treat many different types of infection caused by bacteria, such as tonsillitis, bronchitis, pneumonia, and infections of the ear, nose, throat, skin, or urinary tract.

Amoxicillin is also sometimes used together with another antibiotic called clarithromycin (Biaxin) to treat stomach ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori infection. This combination is sometimes used with a stomach acid reducer called lansoprazole (Prevacid).

Amoxicillin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking amoxicillin?

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to any penicillin antibiotic, such as ampicillin, dicloxacillin, oxacillin, penicillin, or ticarcillin.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • kidney disease;
  • mononucleosis (also called "mono");
  • diarrhea caused by taking antibiotics; or
  • food or drug allergies (especially to a cephalosporin antibiotic such as Omnicef, Cefzil, Ceftin, Keflex, and others).

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Amoxicillin can make birth control pills less effective. Ask your doctor about using a non-hormonal birth control (condom, diaphragm, cervical cap, or contraceptive sponge) to prevent pregnancy.

It may not be safe to breastfeed while using this medicine. Ask your doctor about any risk.

How should I take amoxicillin?

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Take this medicine at the same time each day.

Some forms of amoxicillin may be taken with or without food. Check your medicine label to see if you should take your amoxicillin with food or not.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) before you measure a dose.

Measure liquid medicine with the dosing syringe provided, or use a medicine dose-measuring device (not a kitchen spoon). You may mix the liquid with water, milk, baby formula, fruit juice, or ginger ale. Drink all of the mixture right away. Do not save for later use.

You must chew the chewable tablet before you swallow it.

Swallow the regular tablet whole and do not crush, chew, or break it.

You will need frequent medical tests.

If you are taking amoxicillin with clarithromycin and/or lansoprazole to treat stomach ulcer, use all of your medications as directed. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor's advice.

Use this medicine for the full prescribed length of time, even if your symptoms quickly improve. Skipping doses can increase your risk of infection that is resistant to medication. Amoxicillin will not treat a viral infection such as the flu or a common cold.

Do not share this medicine with another person, even if they have the same symptoms you have.

This medicine can affect the results of certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using amoxicillin.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

You may store liquid amoxicillin in a refrigerator but do not allow it to freeze. Throw away any liquid amoxicillin that is not used within 14 days after it was mixed at the pharmacy.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Skip the missed dose and use your next dose at the regular time. Do not use two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking amoxicillin?

Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, call your doctor before using anti-diarrhea medicine.

What other drugs will affect amoxicillin?

Tell your doctor about all your other medicines, especially:

  • any other antibiotics;
  • allopurinol;
  • probenecid; or
  • a blood thinner --warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may affect amoxicillin, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about amoxicillin.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2021 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 10.01. Revision date: 11/26/2019.

Your use of the content provided in this service indicates that you have read, understood and agree to the End-User License Agreement, which can be accessed by End-User License Agreement, which can be accessed by clicking on this link.

Sours: https://www.peacehealth.org/medical-topics/id/d00088a1

And white capsule amoxicillin red

amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium

What is the most important information I should know about amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium?

You should not use this medicine if you have severe kidney disease, if you have had liver problems or jaundice while taking amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium, or if you are allergic to any penicillin or cephalosporin antibiotic, such as Amoxil, Ceftin, Cefzil, Moxatag, Omnicef, and others.

What is amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium?

Amoxicillin is a penicillin antibiotic. Clavulanate potassium helps prevent certain bacteria from becoming resistant to amoxicillin.

Amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium is a combination medicine used to treat many different infections caused by bacteria, such as sinusitis, pneumonia, ear infections, bronchitis, urinary tract infections, and infections of the skin.

Amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium?

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to it, or if:

  • you have severe kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);
  • you have had liver problems or jaundice while taking amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium; or
  • you are allergic to any penicillin or cephalosporin antibiotic, such as Amoxil, Ceftin, Cefzil, Moxatag, Omnicef, and others.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • liver disease (hepatitis or jaundice);
  • kidney disease; or
  • mononucleosis.

The liquid or chewable tablet may contain phenylalanine. Tell your doctor if you have phenylketonuria (PKU).

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium can make birth control pills less effective. Ask your doctor about using a non-hormonal birth control (condom, diaphragm, cervical cap, or contraceptive sponge) to prevent pregnancy.

Do not give this medicine to a child without medical advice.

How should I take amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium?

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium may work best if you take it at the start of a meal.

Take the medicine every 12 hours.

Do not crush or chew the extended-release tablet. Swallow the pill whole, or break the pill in half and take both halves one at a time. Tell your doctor if you have trouble swallowing a whole or half pill.

You must chew the chewable tablet before you swallow it.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) before you measure a dose. Use the dosing syringe provided, or use a medicine dose-measuring device (not a kitchen spoon).

This medicine can affect the results of certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium.

Use this medicine for the full prescribed length of time, even if your symptoms quickly improve. Skipping doses can increase your risk of infection that is resistant to medication. Amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium will not treat a viral infection such as the flu or a common cold.

Store the tablets at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Store the liquid in the refrigerator. Throw away any unused liquid after 10 days.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose can cause nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, diarrhea, skin rash, drowsiness, hyperactivity, and decreased urination.

What should I avoid while taking amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium?

Avoid taking this medicine together with or just after eating a high-fat meal. This will make it harder for your body to absorb the medication.

Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, call your doctor before using anti-diarrhea medicine.

What other drugs will affect amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium?

Tell your doctor about all your other medicines, especially:

  • allopurinol;
  • probenecid; or
  • a blood thinner --warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may affect amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2021 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 12.01. Revision date: 2/24/2020.

Your use of the content provided in this service indicates that you have read, understood and agree to the End-User License Agreement, which can be accessed by End-User License Agreement, which can be accessed by clicking on this link.

Sours: https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/d00089a1
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She laughed at the anticipation of such a situation, and decided that the senior manager was right not to allow her to be excommunicated.

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Tanya silently gently took him into her magic mouth and began to masterfully excite, transforming me from a timid creature into a passionate male. I closed my eyes. Tanka was clearly not satisfied with the previous partner, and I realized that I would now be entrusted with a more responsible and more important mission than Slavka. When I opened my eyes, I saw that Tanya was already playing with pleasure with a real rearing male member.

In front of her small beautiful mouth, he seemed like a huge rod, and I, feeling a surge of confidence and strong excitement, took the initiative in my own.



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