Spring cloud gateway: routes

Spring cloud gateway: routes DEFAULT

Spring Cloud Tutorial - Spring Cloud Gateway Hello World Example

The Maven project will be as follows-
spring cloud first microservice
The pom.xml will be as follows- <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd"> <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion> <parent> <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId> <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-parent</artifactId> <version>2.1.7.RELEASE</version> <relativePath /> <!-- lookup parent from repository --> </parent> <groupId>com.javainuse</groupId> <artifactId>first-service</artifactId> <version>0.0.1-SNAPSHOT</version> <properties> <java.version>1.8</java.version> </properties> <dependencies> <dependency> <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId> <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-web</artifactId> </dependency> </dependencies> </project> Define the application.yml as follows- spring: application: name: first-service server: port: 8081 Create a Controller class that exposes the GET REST service as follows- package com.javainuse.controller; import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.*; @RestController @RequestMapping("/employee") public class FirstController { @GetMapping("/message") public String test() { return "Hello JavaInUse Called in First Service"; } } Create the bootstrap class with the @SpringBootApplication annotation package com.javainuse; import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication; import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication; @SpringBootApplication public class FirstApplication { public static void main(String[] args) { SpringApplication.run(FirstApplication.class, args); } }

Implement Second Microservice

The Maven project will be as follows-
spring cloud second microservice
The pom.xml will be as follows- <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd"> <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion> <parent> <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId> <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-parent</artifactId> <version>2.1.7.RELEASE</version> <relativePath /> <!-- lookup parent from repository --> </parent> <groupId>com.javainuse</groupId> <artifactId>second-service</artifactId> <version>0.0.1-SNAPSHOT</version> <properties> <java.version>1.8</java.version> </properties> <dependencies> <dependency> <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId> <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-web</artifactId> </dependency> </dependencies> </project> Define the application.properties as follows- spring: application: name: second-service server: port: 8082 Create a Controller class that exposes the GET REST service as follows- package com.javainuse.controller; import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.*; @RestController @RequestMapping("/consumer") public class SecondController { @GetMapping("/message") public String test() { return "Hello JavaInUse Called in Second Service"; } } Create the bootstrap class with the @SpringBootApplication annotation package com.javainuse; import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication; import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication; @SpringBootApplication public class SecondApplication { public static void main(String[] args) { SpringApplication.run(SecondApplication.class, args); } }

Implement Spring Cloud Gateway using property based config

The Maven project will be as follows-
spring cloud gateway microservice
The pom.xml will be as follows- <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd"> <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion> <groupId>com.javainuse</groupId> <artifactId>cloud-gateway-service</artifactId> <version>0.0.1-SNAPSHOT</version> <name>gateway-service</name> <properties> <java.version>1.8</java.version> <spring-cloud.version>Greenwich.SR2</spring-cloud.version> </properties> <dependencies> <dependency> <groupId>org.springframework.cloud</groupId> <artifactId>spring-cloud-starter-gateway</artifactId> </dependency> </dependencies> <dependencyManagement> <dependencies> <dependency> <groupId>org.springframework.cloud</groupId> <artifactId>spring-cloud-dependencies</artifactId> <version>${spring-cloud.version}</version> <type>pom</type> <scope>import</scope> </dependency> </dependencies> </dependencyManagement> <repositories> <repository> <id>spring-milestones</id> <name>Spring Milestones</name> <url>https://repo.spring.io/milestone</url> </repository> </repositories> <build> <plugins> <plugin> <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId> <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId> </plugin> </plugins> </build> </project>Define the application.yml as follows- server: port: 8080 spring: cloud: gateway: routes: - id: employeeModule uri: http://localhost:8081/ predicates: - Path=/employee/** - id: consumerModule uri: http://localhost:8082/ predicates: - Path=/consumer/**Create the bootstrap class with the @SpringBootApplication annotation package com.javainuse; import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication; import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication; @SpringBootApplication public class APIGatewayApplication { public static void main(String[] args) { SpringApplication.run(APIGatewayApplication.class, args); } } Start the three microservices we have developed-
  • Go to url - localhost:8080/employee/message
    spring cloud gateway API tutorial
  • Go to url - localhost:8080/consumer/message
    spring cloud gateway example

Implement Spring Cloud Gateway using Java based config

The Maven project will be as follows-
spring cloud gateway config microservice
The pom.xml will be as follows- <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd"> <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion> <groupId>com.javainuse</groupId> <artifactId>cloud-gateway-service</artifactId> <version>0.0.1-SNAPSHOT</version> <name>gateway-service</name> <properties> <java.version>1.8</java.version> <spring-cloud.version>Greenwich.SR2</spring-cloud.version> </properties> <dependencies> <dependency> <groupId>org.springframework.cloud</groupId> <artifactId>spring-cloud-starter-gateway</artifactId> </dependency> </dependencies> <dependencyManagement> <dependencies> <dependency> <groupId>org.springframework.cloud</groupId> <artifactId>spring-cloud-dependencies</artifactId> <version>${spring-cloud.version}</version> <type>pom</type> <scope>import</scope> </dependency> </dependencies> </dependencyManagement> <repositories> <repository> <id>spring-milestones</id> <name>Spring Milestones</name> <url>https://repo.spring.io/milestone</url> </repository> </repositories> <build> <plugins> <plugin> <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId> <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId> </plugin> </plugins> </build> </project>Define the application.yml as follows- server: port: 8080 Create the configuration class where we define the route configurations. Gateway Handler resolves route configurations by using RouteLocator Bean. package com.javainuse.config; import org.springframework.cloud.gateway.route.RouteLocator; import org.springframework.cloud.gateway.route.builder.RouteLocatorBuilder; import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean; import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration; @Configuration public class SpringCloudConfig { @Bean public RouteLocator gatewayRoutes(RouteLocatorBuilder builder) { return builder.routes() .route(r -> r.path("/employee/**") .uri("http://localhost:8081/") .id("employeeModule")) .route(r -> r.path("/consumer/**") .uri("http://localhost:8082/") .id("consumerModule")) .build(); } } Create the bootstrap class with the @SpringBootApplication annotation package com.javainuse; import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication; import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication; @SpringBootApplication public class APIGatewayApplication { public static void main(String[] args) { SpringApplication.run(APIGatewayApplication.class, args); } } Start the three microservices we have developed-
  • Go to url - localhost:8080/employee/message
    spring cloud gateway API tutorial
  • Go to url - localhost:8080/consumer/message
    spring cloud gateway example

Download Source Code

Download it -
Spring Boot First Microservice
Spring Boot Second Microservice
Spring Cloud Gateway Microservice using Property based Config
Spring Cloud Gateway Microservice using Java based Config

See Also

Spring Boot Hello World Application- Create simple controller and jsp view using MavenSpring Boot Tutorial-Spring Data JPASpring Boot + Simple Security ConfigurationPagination using Spring Boot Simple ExampleSpring Boot + ActiveMQ Hello world ExampleSpring Boot + Swagger Example Hello World ExampleSpring Boot + Swagger- Understanding the various Swagger AnnotationsSpring Boot Main MenuSpring Boot Interview Questions
Sours: https://www.javainuse.com

Spring Cloud Gateway Example

In the last article, we looked into Spring Cloud Gateway and discussed its core concepts and capabilities as a non-blocking API Gateway. In this article, we will use those concepts to develop an end to end microservice architecture based application using spring cloud. In the process, we will use spring cloud gateway as a gateway provider, Netflix Eureka as a discovery server with circuit breaker pattern using Netflix Hystrix.

In this implementation, we will have 2 different spring boot based microservices as first-service and second-service. These services will register themselves to the discovery server. Spring cloud gateway will use Netflix client API to discover the service and route the request to load balanced downstream services.

Here is an example of spring cloud Netflix with Zuul as Gateway Provider.

Discovery Server Implementation

In a microservice architecture, service discovery is one of the key tenets. Service discovery automates the process of multiple instance creations on demand and provides high availability of our microservices.

Below is the pom.xml and application.yml file required for this integration. You can visit my previous article for the complete integration of Netflix Eureka with Spring Cloud

pom.xml

<dependencies> <dependency> <groupId>org.springframework.cloud</groupId> <artifactId>spring-cloud-starter-netflix-eureka-server</artifactId> </dependency> <dependency> <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId> <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-test</artifactId> <scope>test</scope> </dependency> </dependencies> <dependencyManagement> <dependencies> <dependency> <groupId>org.springframework.cloud</groupId> <artifactId>spring-cloud-dependencies</artifactId> <version>${spring-cloud.version}</version> <type>pom</type> <scope>import</scope> </dependency> </dependencies> </dependencyManagement> <repositories> <repository> <id>spring-milestones</id> <name>Spring Milestones</name> <url>https://repo.spring.io/milestone</url> </repository> </repositories> <build> <plugins> <plugin> <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId> <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId> </plugin> </plugins> </build> application.yml spring: application: name: discovery-service eureka: client: eureka-server-connect-timeout-seconds: 5 enabled: true fetch-registry: false register-with-eureka: false server: port: 8761

Spring Cloud Gateway Implementation

Project Setup

First, we will generate a sample spring boot project from https://start.spring.io and import into workspace. The selected dependencies are Gateway, Hystrix and Actuator.

spring-cloud-gateway-project-strct

We will also add spring-cloud-starter-netflix-eureka-client dependency in our pom.

<dependency> <groupId>org.springframework.cloud</groupId> <artifactId>spring-cloud-starter-netflix-eureka-client</artifactId> </dependency>

Spring Cloud Route Configuration

Route is the basic building block of the gateway. It is defined by an ID, a destination URI, a collection of predicates and a collection of filters. A route is matched if aggregate predicate is true.

Spring Cloud Gateway provides many built-in Route Predicate Factories such as Path, Host, Date/Time, Method, Header etc. We can use these built-in route with conjuction with and() or or() to define our routes. Once a request reaches to the gateway, the first thing gateway does is to match the request with each of the available route based on the predicate defined and the request is routed to matched route.

You can follow my another article for the complete spring cloud gateway route predicates..

Below is our route configuration. We have 2 different routes defined for our 2 microservices - first-service and second-service.

Here, we have defined functional routes with Spring WebFlux but you are free to use traditional Spring MVC style routes. You can visit this article for both functional and traditional style API definition.

BeanConfig.java package com.devglan.gatewayservice; import org.springframework.cloud.gateway.route.RouteLocator; import org.springframework.cloud.gateway.route.builder.RouteLocatorBuilder; import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean; import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration; @Configuration public class BeanConfig { @Bean public RouteLocator gatewayRoutes(RouteLocatorBuilder builder) { return builder.routes() .route(r -> r.path("/api/v1/first/**") .filters(f -> f.rewritePath("/api/v1/first/(?

In the above configuration, the first route is matched for a path that has a predicate defined to match all the request URL with . After these multiple filters such as rewritePath, addRequestHeader etc is applied. These are in-built filters provided by the gateway out of the box.

rewritePath filter takes a path regexp parameter and a replacement parameter.

The AddRequestHeader GatewayFilter Factory takes a name and value parameter and adds the configured header param in the request.

The Hystrix GatewayFilter Factory requires a single name parameter, which is the name of the HystrixCommand. The request will be forwarded to the controller matched by the fallbackUri parameter.

Below is an equivalent application.yaml configuration.

spring cloud: gateway: routes: - id: first-service uri: lb://FIRST-SERVICE predicates: - Path=/api/v1/first/** filters: - RewritePath=/api/v1/first/(?

Spring Cloud Gateway Application Config

Below is our application.yaml file.

application.yaml hystrix.command.fallbackcmd.execution.isolation.thread.timeoutInMilliseconds: 2000 spring: application: name: api-gateway server: port: 8088 eureka: client: serviceUrl: defaultZone: http://localhost:8761/eureka register-with-eureka: false instance: preferIpAddress: true management: endpoints: web: exposure: include: hystrix.stream

Hystrix Fallback Command

Below is our controller implementation whose endpoints will be called on failure of our microservices.

HystrixController.java package com.devglan.gatewayservice; import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.GetMapping; import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping; import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController; @RestController @RequestMapping("/fallback") public class HystrixController { @GetMapping("/first") public String firstServiceFallback(){ return "This is a fallback for first service."; } @GetMapping("/second") public String secondServiceFallback(){ return "Second Server overloaded! Please try after some time."; } }

Now, let us define our spring boot main class.

GatewayServiceApplication.java package com.devglan.gatewayservice; import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication; import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication; @SpringBootApplication public class GatewayServiceApplication { public static void main(String[] args) { SpringApplication.run(GatewayServiceApplication.class, args); } }

Microservices Implementation

First Service

These services are very simple implementation with only one controller defined for demo purpose.

FirstController.java package com.devglan.gatewayservice.controller; import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.*; @RestController public class FirstController { @GetMapping("/test") public String test(@RequestHeader("X-first-Header") String headerValue){ return headerValue; } } application.yaml spring: application: name: first-service server: port: 8086 eureka: client: service-url: defaultZone: http://localhost:8761/eureka FirstServiceApplication.java package com.devglan.gatewayservice; import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication; import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication; @SpringBootApplication public class FirstServiceApplication { public static void main(String[] args) { SpringApplication.run(FirstServiceApplication.class, args); } }

Second Service Implementation

SecondController.java @RestController public class SecondController { @GetMapping("/second") public String test(@RequestHeader("X-second-Header") String headerValue){ return headerValue; } } application.yaml spring: application: name: second-service server: port: 8087 eureka: client: service-url: defaultZone: http://localhost:8761/eureka

Adding CORS Configuration in Spring Cloud Gateway

While making API calls from a browser app with cross-origin, we frequently get errors as Cross-Origin Request Blocked and the API call fails. If you have spring cloud gateway as a Gateway provider, then you can define below filter to allow such Cross-origin request.

import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean; import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration; import org.springframework.http.HttpHeaders; import org.springframework.web.cors.CorsConfiguration; import org.springframework.web.cors.reactive.CorsWebFilter; import org.springframework.web.cors.reactive.UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource; import org.springframework.web.reactive.config.CorsRegistry; import org.springframework.web.reactive.config.EnableWebFlux; import org.springframework.web.reactive.config.WebFluxConfigurer; /** * @author Dhiraj Ray * */ @Configuration @EnableWebFlux public class CORSFilter implements WebFluxConfigurer { @Override public void addCorsMappings(CorsRegistry registry) { registry.addMapping("/**") .allowCredentials(true) .allowedOrigins("*") .allowedHeaders("*") .allowedMethods("*"); } @Bean public CorsWebFilter corsWebFilter() { CorsConfiguration corsConfiguration = new CorsConfiguration(); corsConfiguration.setAllowCredentials(true); corsConfiguration.addAllowedHeader("*"); corsConfiguration.addAllowedMethod("*"); corsConfiguration.addAllowedOrigin("*"); UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource corsConfigurationSource = new UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource(); corsConfigurationSource.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", corsConfiguration); return new CorsWebFilter(corsConfigurationSource); } }

Serving Static Content Spring Cloud Gateway

The best practice to host your images or other static contents is the CDN but it is a very common practice to host static files at the Gateway level. Static files can be any image or .html file. As spring cloud gateway is developed upon spring web flux, we can use the spring web flux way to serve our static content from spring cloud gateway.

By default, Spring Boot serves static content from , , , . Hence, without any extra configuration, you can place your static content in any one of these folders and it can be directly accessed with a HTTP request.

There are other different ways too to access these static resources and the complete implementation can be found in my another article here.

Conclusion

In this article, we discussed about spring cloud gateway and created a demo application using it. The source code can be downloaded from github here.

Sours: https://www.devglan.com/
  1. December 28 zodiac sign
  2. Pre approval letter wells fargo
  3. Hp 2000 boot from cd
  4. Glass spice jar black lid

Spring Cloud - Gateway



Introduction

In a distributed environment, services need to communicate with each other. However, this is interservice communication. We also have use-cases where a client outside our domain wants to hit our services for the API. So, either we can expose the address of all our microservices which can be called by clients OR we can create a Service Gateway which routes the request to various microservices and responds to the clients.

Creating a Gateway is much better approach here. There are two major advantages −

  • The security for each individual services does not need to maintained.

  • And, cross-cutting concerns, for example, addition of meta-information can be handled at a single place.

Netflix Zuul and Spring Cloud Gateway are two well-known Cloud Gateways which are used to handle such situations. In this tutorial, we will use Spring Cloud Gateway.

Spring Cloud Gateway – Dependency Setting

Let us use the case of Restaurant which we have been using. Let us add a new service (gateway) in front of our two services, i.e., Restaurant services and Customer Service. First, let us update the pom.xml of the service with the following dependency −

<dependencies> <dependency> <groupId>org.springframework.cloud</groupId> <artifactId>spring-cloud-starter-netflix-eureka-client</artifactId> </dependency> <dependency> <groupId>org.springframework.cloud</groupId> <artifactId>spring-cloud-starter-gateway</artifactId> </dependency> </dependencies>

And then, annotate our Spring application class with the correct annotation, i.e., @EnableDiscoveryClient.

package com.tutorialspoint; import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication; import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication; import org.springframework.cloud.client.discovery.EnableDiscoveryClient; @SpringBootApplication @EnableDiscoveryClient public class RestaurantGatewayService{ public static void main(String[] args) { SpringApplication.run(RestaurantGatewayService.class, args); } }

We are annotating with @EnableDiscoveryClient because we want to use Eureka service discovery to get the list of hosts which are serving a particular use-case

Dynamic Routing with Gateway

The Spring Cloud Gateway has three important parts to it. Those are −

  • Route − These are the building blocks of the gateway which contain URL to which request is to be forwarded to and the predicates and filters that are applied on the incoming requests.

  • Predicate − These are the set of criteria which should match for the incoming requests to be forwarded to internal microservices. For example, a path predicate will forward the request only if the incoming URL contains that path.

  • Filters − These act as the place where you can modify the incoming requests before sending the requests to the internal microservices or before responding back to the client.

Let us write a simple configuration for the Gateway for our Restaurant and Customer service.

spring: application: name: restaurant-gateway-service cloud: gateway: discovery: locator: enabled: true routes: - id: customers uri: lb://customer-service predicates: - Path=/customer/** - id: restaurants uri: lb://restaurant-service predicates: - Path=/restaurant/** server: port: ${app_port} eureka: client: serviceURL: defaultZone: http://localhost:8900/eureka

Points to note about the above configuration −

  • We have enabled the discovery.locator to ensure that the gateway can read from the Eureka server.

  • We have used Path predicated here to route the request. What this means is that any request which begins with /customer would be routed to Customer Service and for /restaurant, we will forward that request to Restaurant Service.

Now let us setup other services prior to the Gateway service −

  • Start the Eureka Server

  • Start the Customer Service

  • Start the Restaurant Service

Now, let us compile and execute the Gateway project. We will use the following command for the same −

java -Dapp_port=8084 -jar .\target\spring-cloud-gateway-1.0.jar

Once this is done, we have our Gateway ready to be tested on port 8084. Let’s first hit http://localhost:8084/customer/1 and we see the request is correctly routed to Customer Service and we get the following output −

{ "id": 1, "name": "Jane", "city": "DC" }

And now, hit our restaurant API, i.e., http://localhost:8084/restaurant/customer/1 and we get the following output −

[ { "id": 1, "name": "Pandas", "city": "DC" }, { "id": 3, "name": "Little Italy", "city": "DC" } ]

This means that both the calls were correctly routed to the respective services.

Predicates & Filters Request

We had used Path predicate in our above example. Here are a few other important predicates −

PredicateDescription
Cookie predicate (input: name and regex)Compares the cookie with the ‘name’ to the ‘regexp’
Header predicate (input: name and regex)Compares the header with the ‘name’ to the ‘regexp’
Host predicate (input: name and regex)Compares the ‘name’ of the incoming to the ‘regexp’
Weight Predicate (input: Group name and the weight)Weight Predicate (input: Group name and the weight)

Filters are used to add/remove data from the request before sending the data to the downstream service or before sending the response back to the client.

Following are a few important filters for adding metadata.

FilterDescription
Add request header filter (input: header and the value)Add a ‘header’ and the ‘value’ before forwarding the request downstream.
Add response header filter (input: header and the value)Add a ‘header’ and the ‘value’ before forwarding the request upstream that is to the client.
Redirect filter (input: status and URL)Adds a redirect header along with the URL before passing over o the downstream host.
ReWritePath (input: regexp and replacement)This is responsible for rewriting the path by replacing the ‘regexp’ matched string with the input replacement.

The exhaustive list for filters and predicates is present at https://cloud.spring.io/spring-cloudgateway/reference/html/#the-rewritepath-gatewayfilter-factory

Monitoring

For monitoring of the Gateway or for accessing various routes, predicates, etc., we can enable the actuator in the project. For doing that, let us first update the pom.xml to contain the actuator as a dependency.

<dependency> <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId> <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-actuator</artifactId> </dependency>

For monitoring, we will use a separate application property file which would contain flags to enable the actuator. So, here is how it would look like −

spring: application: name: restaurant-gateway-service cloud: gateway: discovery: locator: enabled: true routes: - id: customers uri: lb://customer-service predicates: - Path=/customer/** - id: restaurants uri: lb://restaurant-service predicates: - Path=/restaurant/** server: port: ${app_port} eureka: client: serviceURL: defaultZone: http://localhost:8900/eureka management: endpoint: gateway: enabled: true endpoints: web: exposure: include: gateway

Now, to list all the routes, we can hit: http://localhost:8084/actuator/gateway/routes

[ { "predicate": "Paths: [/customer/**], match trailing slash: true", "route_id": "customers", "filters": [], "uri": "lb://customer-service", "order": 0 }, { "predicate": "Paths: [/restaurant/**], match trailing slash: true", "route_id": "restaurants", "filters": [], "uri": "lb://restaurant-service", "order": 0 } ]

Other important APIs for monitoring −

APIDescription
GET /actuator/gateway/routes/{id}Get information about a particular route
POST /gateway/routes/{id_to_be assigned}Add a new route to the Gateway
DELETE /gateway/routes/{id}Remove the route from Gateway
POST /gateway/refreshRemove all the cache entries
Sours: https://www.tutorialspoint.com/spring_cloud/spring_cloud_gateway.htm
Spring Tips: Spring Cloud Gateway

8 Service routing with Spring Cloud Gateway

  • Using a service gateway with your microservices
  • Implementing a service gateway using Spring Cloud API Gateway
  • Mapping microservice routes in the gateway
  • Building filters to use correlation ID and tracking

In a distributed architecture like a microservices one, there will come the point where we’ll need to ensure that critical behaviors such as security, logging, and tracking of users across multiple service calls occur. To implement this functionality, we’ll want these attributes to be consistently enforced across all of our services without the need for each individual development team to build their own solutions. While it’s possible to use a common library or framework to assist with building these capabilities directly in an individual service, doing so has three implications.

First, it’s challenging to implement these capabilities in each service consistently. Developers are focused on delivering functionality, and in the whirlwind of day-to-day activity, they can easily forget to implement service logging or tracking unless they work in a regulated industry where it’s required.

8.1           What is a services gateway?

8.2           Introducing Spring Cloud Gateway

8.2.1   Setting up the Gateway Spring Boot project

8.2.2   Configuring the Spring Cloud Gateway to communicate with Eureka

8.3           Configuring routes in Spring Cloud Gateway

8.3.1   Automated mapping of routes via service discovery

8.3.2   Mapping routes manually using service discovery

8.3.3   Dynamically reload route configuration

8.3.4   Spring Cloud Gateway and service timeouts

8.4           The real power of the Spring Cloud Gateway: predicate and filters factories

8.4.1   Built-in Predicates Factories

8.4.2   Built-in Filters Factories

8.4.3   Custom Filters

8.5           Building the pre-filter

8.5.1   Using the correlation ID in the services

8.6           Building a post filter receiving correlation IDs

8.7           Summary

Sours: https://livebook.manning.com/book/spring-microservices-in-action-second-edition/chapter-8/v-6/

Gateway: routes cloud spring

Spring Cloud Gateway - Part 1

API Gateway is the entry point to the application, through which the client (Web/Mobile/Desktop) can make REST API calls. API Gateway will allow us to secure the endpoints, throttle, and monitor the traffic.

Many open-source libraries are available for creating an API Gateway, like Netflix Zuul and Amazon API Gateway. In this article, we will look at creating a project using Spring Cloud Gateway.

Spring cloud gateway simplifies the creation of API Gateway service. We should have a separate API gateway service in the production environment without any business logic; this will allow us to deploy or change the API gateway without impacting other services.

Spring Cloud Gateway

We only need to make changes in the application.yml file to configure the routes, and we can create a Spring cloud gateway project by simply going to start.spring.io and selecting gateway dependency.

You can click this link to see my preconfigured spring cloud gateway project. Download and import into your editor.

We need to understand three concepts to work on the Spring cloud gateway project.

  • Route: Route is the combination of destination URL, predicate, and filter.
  • Predicate: These are like ‘if’ conditions. If the predicate is true, then the request is directed to the configured Route.
  • Filter: To modify the request and responses.

I used HttpBin to configure gateway endpoints. Httpbin is the free HTTP request and response service.

Configure Routes

Open application.yml and modify it with the below content;

  • API gateway will listen on port 9091.
  • Configure routes under ‘spring.cloud.gateway.routes’ property. In this file, we configured one Route.
  • Route will have a unique id, destination URL, and a list of predicates or filters. In this case, we have one predicate.
  • Spring cloud gateway provides many predicates. For example, some of them are Path, Header, Cookie, and Query. In our example, we used the Path predicate. Predicates are recognized by the predicate type (Path, Cookie, Header), followed by an equal sign (=), followed by argument values separated by commas (,).

Run the application and execute a CURL command to make a get request on ‘http://localhost:9091/get.’

We made a GET request on /get endpoint, and this request will match with the Path ‘/get’ which we mentioned in the Predicate, so the request directs to https://httpbin.org/.

In the next section, we will see an example of Header Predicate.

Matches with a header in the HTTP request. To make it simple, I am showing only the predicates section instead of the whole configuration file.

Matches only if the request contains a header ‘App-Context-Id’ with any alphanumeric value.

Go through this link to see all available Predicate’s in Spring Cloud Gateway

Conclusion

We went through the basics of Sping API gateway components and worked on a sample project to configure a route using Path and Header predicates.

Sours: https://thetechstack.net/spring-cloud-gateway-part-1/
How to use the Spring Cloud Gateway Filter for Authentication - Microservices 3

Place with subsequent career growth. But first, show me why you need it, - he threw a condom with sperm at my feet. Judging by his malicious smile, Frankie at least guessed if he didn't know for sure, and I, in turn, was not going to hide my intentions at all. Almost proudly lifting up her nose, she untied the elastic band and holding the end filled with sperm with her fingers, squeezed the tasty.

Contents into her mouth and swallowed every last drop with undisguised pleasure.

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I immediately understood it. - he says and slaps his palm on my clitoris. I cry out. Hush, hush, his hand lets go of my neck and covers my mouth.



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