Sears craftsman ratchet wrench set

Sears craftsman ratchet wrench set DEFAULT

Sears Launches Exclusive New Line Of Craftsman Tools

The Craftsman® Ultimate Collection features the most sought-after tools, hand-picked by mechanics for mechanics, available only at Sears

HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill., Feb. 21, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Propelled by a continued commitment to deliver high-quality products to its customers, Sears today announced the launch of the Craftsman Ultimate Collection, featuring a variety of innovative tool sets designed for mechanics. The Ultimate Collection features newly redesigned, high performance ratchets and ratcheting wrenches. Most sets include unique time-saving accessories such as speed handles, spinner discs and ratcheting adapters, ideal for professional mechanics as well as DIYers, to get the job done faster. This range of high-performance ratchets, wrenches and more are exclusively available at Sears stores, online at Sears.com and at Sears Hometown stores.

The Craftsman Ultimate Collection is available exclusively at Sears, on sears.com and at Sears Hometown stores. The new professional-grade line was created with input directly from mechanics and is available in 104 piece, 220 piece and 302 piece sets. Shown: the 220 piece Mechanics Service Set.

"Sears is the real home of the broadest assortment of Craftsman, and we're pleased to offer our customers innovative new products from this power brand," said Peter Boutros, president of Kenmore, Craftsman and DieHard and chief brand officer for Sears and Kmart. "What better way to ensure our mechanic sets are professional-grade, than by working with professionals to create the set? With the Ultimate Collection, we are proud to be offering professional-grade tools we know our customers will love. And these tool sets are only available at Sears."

This new line was created with input directly from mechanics to most accurately understand their unique needs, resulting in professional quality tools with no filler pieces, such as insert bits. From size range to product inclusion, each set is vigorously tested to ensure durability and comfort. Key differentiators include:

  • High Performance Ratchets: Ergonomically designed with 90 teeth for fine movement, longer handles and only 4 degrees of swing arc for better and faster results. Ratcheting wrenches have 144 positions for a 2.5-degree arc, offering precise movements in hard-to-reach areas.
  • One-Of-A-Kind Transformer Ratcheting Wrench: This unique tool boasts a 360-degree rotational and flexible handle head, an unbeatable combination to achieve better access and faster results.
  • Craftsman at Sears No-Hassle Lifetime Warranty: If any tool fails to perform for any reason, Sears will replace it, hassle-free.

A few products in the Craftsman Ultimate Collection include:

The Craftsman Ultimate Collection is now available in Sears stores and online at Sears.com/craftsmanultimate and also at Sears Hometown stores. Join Sears on social media to hear more about the latest news – "Like" Sears on Facebook, and "follow" Sears on Twitter and Instagram.

About Sears
Sears is a leading integrated retailer providing a wide range of home merchandise, apparel and automotive products and services through Sears-branded and affiliated full-line and specialty retail stores, as well as through Sears.com. Home to some of the most trusted and preferred brands in the U.S., Sears' product offering includes Kenmore, Craftsman and DieHard. Sears is part of Shop Your Way, a social shopping program where members can earn points and receive benefits both in stores and online. Sears is the nation's largest provider of home services, with more than 6,000 expert technicians who make nearly 11 million service calls annually. For more information, visit the Sears website at www.sears.com.

Craftsman at Sears
The Craftsman brand has been America's most trusted tool brand for generations, woven into the fabric of the American lifestyle. And Sears is your first destination for Craftsman products, with the widest selection on the planet and the original home of Craftsman. Craftsman at Sears continues to develop innovative tools and products, earning a reputation for unsurpassed quality and durability. This includes a full range of hand and power tools that meet the needs of the DIY user and the demanding professional. In addition, Craftsman at Sears also includes lawn and garden products and tool storage. Plus, Craftsman at Sears is part of Shop Your Way®, a social shopping experience where members have the ability to earn points and receive benefits when shopping at Sears stores and www.Sears.com/Craftsman.

MEDIA CONTACT
Larry Costello
Sears PR
(847) 286-9036
[email protected]

SOURCE Sears

Sours: https://transformco.com/press-releases/pr/2127

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Sours: https://www.craftsman.com/products/hand-tools/wrenches-wrench-sets
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Craftsman ratchet wrenches any good?

powertrip said:

If they are made in china they are about the same quality as gearwrench brand wrenches. They should be fine for home use.

Click to expand...


So, at risk of starting yet another debate/argument, I feel compelled to point out that there's absolutely NOTHING wrong with the quality of GearWrench - in fact, I'd point out that USA-made ratcheting wrenches are nothing more than a knock-off of GearWrench, regardless of brand.

The COO on these pertains not one iota towards their quality. The Craftsman ratcheting wrenches are great quality, the GearWrench branded ones are equally-great quality - and usually cheaper.

Quite honestly, they're probably easier to warranty as well, given that you can warranty them at Sears, NAPA, anywhere that carries GearWrench, really.

Craftsman ratcheting wrenches and GearWrench ratcheting wrenches are fine for home use or "professional" use.

Either one will do you perfectly well for any application. Expect to see another GearWrench 50% off sale between now and the end of the year (if the current one has ended already).

 

Sours: https://www.garagejournal.com/forum/threads/craftsman-ratchet-wrenches-any-good.120867/
Craftsman Ratcheting Reversible Combination Box Wrench Set Review

Craftsman Tools:


  • What's New (Last Updated April 30, 2021)
    Recent changes to this page:
    • 04/30/2021: Renumbered figures, added a Craftsman "V" 17x19mm Open-End Wrench, a Craftsman "V" 1/2 Flex-Box Combination Wrench, and a Craftsman 42545 "V" 5/8 Flex-Box Combination Wrench.
    • 04/29/2021: Added a Craftsman 44474 "V" 3/4x7/8 Tappet Wrench, a Craftsman 43919 "V" 1/4x5/16 Box-End Wrench, and a Craftsman "V" 5/8x3/4 Short Box-End Wrench.
    • 04/28/2021: Added a Craftsman "V" 11/16x13/16 Offset Box-End Wrench and a Craftsman "V" 6x8mm Offset Box-End Wrench.
    • 04/27/2021: Added a Craftsman "V" 5/8x11/16 Offset Box-End Wrench, a Craftsman 42957 "V" 13x15mm Box-End Wrench, a Craftsman "V" 14mm Combination Wrench, and a Craftsman 7/16 Combination Wrench.
    • 04/26/2021: Added a section on manufacturing dates, added a Craftsman "V" 3/8 Combination Wrench and a Craftsman 44696 "V" 9/16 Combination Wrench.
    • 04/22/2021: Added a Craftsman "BF" 5/8 Combination Wrench.
    • 05/02/2019: Changes for responsive design.
    • 01/15/2019: Fixed bitrot with book preview.
    • 01/07/2016: Added a Dunlap 3/8x7/16 Offset Box Wrench.
    • 12/11/2015: Added Craftsman 4507 Combination Pliers.
    • 12/10/2015: Added Sears "BF" Combination Wrench.
    • 12/04/2015: Added Craftsman 4476 Battery Pliers.
    • 11/10/2015: Minor reorganization, expanded discussion of origin of modern era.
    • 12/26/2011: Added a Craftsman "V" 12 Inch Chain Pipe Wrench.
    • 08/29/2011: Added Craftsman Hose-Clamp Pliers.
    • 05/30/2011: Added Craftsman 4-Position Waterpump Pliers.
    • 05/28/2011: Added a Dunlap "LC" 5/8 Combination Wrench.
    • 05/07/2011: Added a Craftsman "V" Battery Wrench.
    • 03/03/2011: Added a Craftsman "Y-Circle" 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench.
    • 02/28/2011: Added a Craftsman "P-Circle" 5/8x3/4 Open-End Wrench and a Transitional Craftsman "V" No. 3 Tappet Wrench.
    • 02/20/2011: Added a Craftsman 3/4 Star Drill.
    • 02/13/2011: Added a Early Craftsman "V" Offset Box Wrench and a Craftsman "V" 1/2-Drive Quick-Release Dual-Pawl Ratchet.
    • 02/10/2011: Added a Craftsman "V" 1/2-Drive Ratchet with V-Shifter.
    • 02/08/2011: Added a Craftsman "Y-Circle" 12 Inch Adjustable Wrench.
    • 02/06/2011: Added a Craftsman "V" 43187 1/4-Drive Quick-Release Dual-Pawl Ratchet.
    • 02/05/2011: Added a Craftsman "V" 1/4-Drive Ratchet with V-Shifter.
    • 02/04/2011: Added a Craftsman "V" 3/8-Drive Ratchet with V-Shifter.
    • 02/03/2011: Added a Craftsman 1/4x5/16 Ratcheting Box Wrench.
    • 02/02/2011: Added patent table, added a Craftsman "V" 1/2-Drive Ratchet.
    • 02/01/2011: Added a Craftsman "V" 3/8-Drive Quick-Release Ratchet and a Craftsman 43788 "V" 3/8-Drive Quick-Release Dual-Pawl Ratchet.
    • 01/26/2011: Added a Craftsman 13/16x7/8 Ratcheting Box Wrench.
    • 01/22/2011: Added a Craftsman 3/8x7/16 Ratcheting Box Wrench and a Craftsman 8 Inch Locking Adjustable Wrench.
    • 01/10/2011: Added a Craftsman Battery Pliers.
    • 10/15/2010: Added Craftsman 10 Inch Locking Adjustable Wrench.
    • 09/30/2010: Added Craftsman Brake Spring Pliers.
    • 07/01/2010: Added Craftsman Tongue-and-Groove Angle-Head Pliers.
    • 05/18/2010: Added Craftsman Tongue-and-Groove Angle-Head Pliers.
    • 07/09/2009: Added a Dunlap "V" 11/16x3/4 Offset Box Wrench.
    • 05/23/2009: Added a Craftsman Early "V" 3/4x7/8 Offset Box Wrench.
    • 05/19/2009: Added a Craftsman "P-Circle" 25/32x13/16 Open-End Wrench.
    • 04/10/2009: Added a Dunlap 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench.
    • 03/26/2009: Added Craftsman Waterpump Pliers with Rope-Banded Handles.
    • 10/05/2008: Updated discussion.
    • 08/09/2008: Added a Craftsman Early "V" 15/16x1 Offset Box Wrench.
    • 04/09/2008: Updated catalog resources.
    • 03/08/2008: Added a Craftsman 19/32x25/32 Offset Box Wrench.
    • 01/14/2008: Added a Craftsman 3/8x7/16 Open-End Wrench.
    • 12/17/2007: Added a Craftsman 11/16 Paneled Combination Wrench.
    • 12/10/2007: Added a Craftsman "V" 3/8Wx7/16W Whitworth Open-End Wrench.
    • 12/02/2007: Added a Craftsman "V" 1/2 Combination Wrench.
    • 11/30/2007: Added a Craftsman 5/8x3/4 Offset Box Wrench.
    • 10/22/2007: Added a Craftsman "V" 1/2x9/16 Open-End Wrench.
    • 11/05/2006: Added a Craftsman Pin Punch.
    • 10/11/2007: Page created, not much content yet.

Introduction

In an earlier article we reviewed the Early Craftsman Tools of the late 1920s through mid 1940s, and a separate article covered the Craftsman "BE" and H-Circle line of sockets in greater depth. In this page we'll look at the Craftsman "Modern Era" that began around 1945, with a particular emphasis on the manufacturer of the Craftsman "V" series tools. But before revealing the identity of Maker "V", we want to offer some thoughts on the origin and intent of the modern era tools.

Origins of The Modern Style

By the early 1940s the Craftsman brand was about 15 years old and had become highly successful. The Craftsman line included a full range of mechanics' hand tools by this time, from sockets and drive tools to wrenches and pliers, as well as a broad range of woodworking tools and power tools. And the tools had an excellent reputation for quality — from the beginning, the Craftsman line had been built by selecting tools from leading makers, ensuring their quality and functionality.

But something was missing. If you could have looked into the toolbox of someone who had purchased exclusively Craftsman tools during the 1930s, you would have seen a hodge-podge of styles and designs of tools, all of fine quality but without much in common except for the stamped Craftsman name.

If we now look forward to the Craftsman "modern era", the most striking change to be seen is that, for the first time, Craftsman tools had a common design to serve as a brand identity. All of the tools with anything like a handle had polished raised panels stamped with the Craftsman logo, and everything had a polished chrome finish.

From this obvious change we can infer that giving the tools a common design was one of the priorities when Sears started planning their next generation tools. But how did they achieve this? Did they search for a maker with an existing broad line of suitable tools? It would seem that Sears had three choices:

  1. Find an existing manufacturer with a broad line, and willing to act as the contract maker.
  2. Ask potential manufacturers to submit prototype tools as a bid for the contract.
  3. Develop the design and specifications for the tools themselves, and then seek a contract maker.

Of these alternatives, we can easily rule out the first. Existing makers with a full line, such as Bonney, Herbrand, Plomb, or Snap-on, would have been concerned about maintaining their own (higher margin) brand identity. In addition, we know from experience that there weren't any other tools in the 1940s matching the Craftsman "V" style: before finding the actual maker, we conducted an extensive and fruitless search for other brands of tools matching the Craftsman models.

Alternative (2) would seem reasonable, though there's a bit of a chicken-and-egg problem here. Existing makers asked to provide prototypes or samples, but without a firm contract in hand, would be likely to offer tools they already made, to avoid the cost of developing new dies and tooling. And if the maker already produced both forged wrenches and socket tools, they were already full-line manufacturers and would have been concerned about diluting their own brands.

The last alternative is intriguing and may seem even a bit radical. A company that designs and specifies a product is already more than half way to being a manufacturer, and Sears has always been considered as just a buyer and retailer, not a manufacturer. However, Sears had long operated a highly-regarded product testing laboratory, and a company that can test to spec is well equipped to write a spec. And by the early 1940s the Sears hardware department knew a lot about tools.

Based on the evidence collected so far, we believe that Sears chose alternative (3). More specifically, they developed the design and specifications for the modern era tools, then "auditioned" multiple companies (at least two) to produce tools to the specification. Furthermore, the initial production runs were not mere prototypes, but were actually sold to the public!

The evidence for this seems clear enough. In researching the early production of the modern era, we were able to collect a number of examples believed to be from around 1945. Multiple tools were found that could be attributed to different makers, but which were basically identical in design and dimensions. The only reasonable conclusion is that both makers were following the same spec, which logically would have to been provided by Sears. We'll present the evidence in the section Prelude to the Modern Style.

Then after this audition process, Sears evaluated the results and chose Maker "V" as their primary contract manufacturer. And that brings us neatly to the next section, where we will finally get to meet Maker "V".

Tracking Maker "V"

Since we've made the "V" series tools the centerpiece of this article, we'll begin by establishing the identity of the manufacturer of the "V" series. The "V" series tools were made by Moore Drop Forging of Springfield, Massachusetts, a company with operations going back to the early 20th century. Moore Drop Forging was later reorganized as the Easco Corporation, and then still later became part of the Danaher conglomerate. (See our article on Moore Drop Forging for more information.)

Although Moore Drop Forging was well known as a tool maker in the early to mid 20th century, most of their tool output was contract production for automobile toolkits, items that were generally cheaply made and roughly finished. Without any apparent examples of high quality tools with chrome plated finishes produced by Moore, some readers might be surprised or even skeptical that Moore was really the maker behind the Craftsman "V" series. Thus we'll outline the evidence found to establish Moore Drop Forging as Maker "V", in roughly the order that the clues were discovered.

Patent Clues

The first break in identifying Maker "V" came via the patent notice on a "V" series ratchet, specifically for the Haznar 1969 patent #3,467,231. This patent describes the ratchet mechanism used in the Craftsman dual-pawl fine-tooth ratchets and has an explicit assignment to Moore Drop Forging, providing a clear link between Moore and the "V" series line.

Our next clue also came from a patent document, this time for design patent #D185,651, issued to R.W. Vose in 1959 with assignment to Moore Drop Forging. This patent describes and illustrates a distinctive "V"-shaped shift lever for ratchets, and an example of a ratchet with the patented shift lever can be seen as the Craftsman Ratchet with "V"-Shaped Shifter. These popular and familiar ratchets were sold beginning in 1959 and continuing into the early 1960s.

The next clue was found in a court document for the case Peter M. ROBERTS v. SEARS, ROEBUCK AND COMPANY [Sorry, dead link 😢] litigation arising from the patent for the well-known quick-release mechanism on Craftsman ratchets. In the court transcript Moore Drop Forging is described as the "custom manufacturer of wrenches" for Sears.

Springfield Volume II

More direct evidence was found in the book Springfield, Volume II by Ginger Cruikshank (Arcadia Publishing 2000), a collection of photographs and essays related to Springfield, Massachusetts. Moore Drop Forging was included as one of the important businesses in the Springfield area, and the book provides a quick history of the company, noting that Moore began making hand tools for Sears in 1938.

Cruikshank's book includes a photograph of the large modern factory built by Moore in Springfield to support its Craftsman contract, and photographs of the factory and operations can be found beginning on page 52. (In earlier versions of this article we were able to provide links to photographs via Google Books, which unfortunately are no longer offered; however, a preview of the book is still available at Google Books.) The book credits the Danaher Corporation (the later corporate parent of Moore Drop Forging) for several of the photographs, so the information on Moore is presumed to be accurate.

One More Patent ...

We hope that by now our readers are convinced of the identity of Maker "V", but if not, perhaps one further bit of evidence will help. Patent #2,944,452 describes a chain pipe wrench and was issued to R.W. Vose in 1960, again with assignment to Moore Drop Forging. An example of this patent can be seen as the Craftsman "V" Chain Pipe Wrench.


Patents

Patent No.InventorFiledIssuedNotes and Examples
2,112,840F.A. Haist05/08/193504/05/1938Method of Making Adjustable Wrenches
Craftsman Locking Adjustable Wrench
2,181,764A.T. Murray11/23/193811/28/1939Wrench Set Holder
2,430,368J.J. Rearden04/12/194611/04/1947Method for Broaching Sockets
2,719,449W.J. Johnson07/27/195310/04/1955Adjustable Wrench Locking Mechanism
Craftsman Locking Adjustable Wrench
D185,651R.W. Vose02/19/195907/07/1959Design for Ratchet Shift Lever
Craftsman "V" Ratchet with "V"-Shaped Shifter
D186,188R.W. Vose04/06/195909/22/1959Design for Ratchet Shift Lever
2,944,252R.W. Vose04/10/195907/12/1960Chain Pipe Wrench
Craftsman "V" Chain Pipe Wrench
3,208,318P.M. Roberts04/24/196409/28/1965Quick Release Mechanism
Craftsman "V" Quick-Release Ratchet
3,467,231H.J. Haznar02/12/196809/16/1969Pawl Reversing Mechanism
Craftsman 43788 "V" Quick-Release Dual-Pawl Ratchet
3,532,013H.J. Haznar05/01/196810/06/1970Quick Release Mechanism
Craftsman 43788 "V" Quick-Release Dual-Pawl Ratchet

Manufacturer's Codes

Although Maker "V" was the dominant producer of Craftsman tools during this era, many other companies supplied tools as well. This table shows the manufacturer's codes known to have been used from the mid 1940s through 1970s or later.

Manufacturer's codes used during the early Craftsman years can be seen in the section on Manufacturer's Codes, 1920s to Mid 1940s.

CodeDescriptionManufacturerUsage PeriodExamples and Notes
AZ-Circle"AZ" in a CircleJ.H. Williams1950s to 1960sFound on Craftsman Locking Adjustable Wrench.
B-Circle"B" in a CircleUnknown1940s to 1960s?Found on Craftsman 4507 Combination Pliers
and Craftsman 4476 Battery Pliers.
BFBlock LettersJapanese Maker1960s to 1970s?Known on wrenches and pliers, typically with "Japan".
D.I.Block LettersDuro/Indestro1950s to 1970s?Found on ratcheting box wrenches with raised "=Craftsman=" panel,
e.g. Craftsman Ratcheting Box Wrench.
G-Circle"G" in a CircleUnknown1950s to 1960s?Found on Craftsman Star Drill.
JWBlock LettersJ.H. Williams1960s to 1970sStamped marking on adjustable wrenches, e.g. Craftsman Adjustable Wrench.
LCBlock LettersJ.P. Danielson1930s to 1960s?Stamped code observed on primarily on pliers, e.g. Combination Pliers.
Usage appears to overlap with "A.0." code, e.g. Dunlap Combination Pliers.
LCBlock LettersLectrolite1950sForged-in code observed on economy wrenches,
e.g. Dunlap Offset Box Wrench.
N-Square"N" in a SquareUnknown1930s to 1940s?Found on chisels and punches, e.g. Craftsman Punch.
Also noted on Craftsman 4-Position Waterpump Pliers.
P-Circle"P" in a CircleWilde Tool1940s to 1960sStamped or forged.
Often noted on pliers, e.g. Craftsman Angle-Nose Pliers.
Less commonly observed on wrenches.
VBlock LettersMoore Drop Forging1938 OnwardGenerally stamped, but may be forged on early tools.
WFBlock LettersWestern Forge1965 OnwardGenerally forged into tools.
Y-Circle"Y" in a CircleUnknown1950s to 1960sForged-in code found on Craftsman and Dunlap adjustable wrenches.

Manufacturing Dates

The Craftsman modern era extends for many decades from its start in the mid 1940s, and the design of the tools has remained relatively unchanged over this span. With few production changes to rely on, it's therefore difficult to estimate the production date for many of the tools from this period.

One change that did occur though was the addition of model number markings to the tools. The Sears catalogs had long used model numbers in their listings, but these were not actually marked on tools (with a few exceptions) until sometime between 1968 and 1970.

Even this date itself was hard to estimate — the catalogs just use the same model numbers from year to year, and the illustrations don't actually show model number markings. We were able to make an estimate based on observations of Craftsman ratchets with patent pending markings for known patents.

We will try to develop some guidelines for estimating production dates in the modern era.

  • "V"-Shaped Shifters. In 1959 Craftsman began using a distinctive "V" shaped shifter on its ratchets, and a review of the catalogs shows these ratchets remained available at least until 1964. For now we will use an estimated date range of 1959-1964 for this feature.

  • Model Number Marking. Craftsman tools began carrying model number markings sometime between 1968 and 1970, based on observations of ratchets with patent pending markings. For simplicity we will use dates up to 1969 for tools without model numbers, and dates 1970 or later for tools with model numbers.


References and Resources

Photographs and observations of particular tools are based on items in the Alloy Artifacts collection.


Catalog Coverage

We have fairly extensive catalog coverage for the Craftsman post-war production, as summarized in the table below.

YearFormatNotes
1947FullFull selection of modern style tools.
Some older "BE" socket sets still listed.
1949HalfNo "BE" socket sets, but scattered illustrations of "BE" style sockets.
1952HalfLists combination wrenches in 10 sizes from 3/8 to 1 inch.
1953HalfLists "Arc-joint" tongue-and-groove pliers in Craftsman and Dunlap brands.
Rear cover shows "Arc-joint" Craftsman pliers with P-Circle code.
1954FullLists Craftsman 8-In-1 ("Dogbone") wrench.
1955Full 
1957FullLists combination wrenches in 12 sizes from 5/16 to 1 inch.
Lists Craftsman 8-In-1 wrench, Craftsman locking adjustable wrenches.
Lists Craftsman flex-box combination wrenches, six sizes 3/8 to 3/4.
1960FullLists combination wrenches in 18 sizes from 1/4 to 1-5/16.
Lists Craftsman 8-In-1 wrench, Craftsman locking adjustable wrenches.
Illustration shows Craftsman ratchet with "V" shifter.
1962?FullDunlap brand tools still listed.
1964FullNo references to Dunlap brand found.
Lists Craftsman 8-In-1 wrench, no locking adjustable wrenches.
Illustration shows Craftsman ratchet with "V" shifter.
1966Full 
1968Full 

Prelude to the Modern Style

In this section we'll look at some early examples of Craftsman "modern era" tools that we believe were actually part of an "audition" process leading to the selection of the contract manufacturer. This process would have taken place in the late WWII and early post-war period, when limitations on tool sales to consumers were being lifted.

The examples found so far can be attributed to two different manufacturers, but this raises the question of whether additional manufacturers might have participated. We suspect that there might have been at least one other, but are not ready to present evidence.


Early "V" 3/4x7/8 Open-End Wrench

This next figure shows an early example of the Craftsman "V" series.
[Craftsman V 3/4x7/8 Open-End Wrench]

Fig. 1. Craftsman "V" 3/4x7/8 Open-End Wrench, with Inset for Reverse Detail, ca. 1945.

Fig. 1 shows a Craftsman 3/4x7/8 open-end wrench with raised panels, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." on the reverse panel.

The reverse side also has a "V" code forged into the shank.

The overall length is 9.2 inches, and wrench appears to have a thin plated finish.

The faces of this wrench have traces of grinding or milling operations, suggesting production during the wartime period.


Early "V" 1/2 Combination Wrench

[Craftsman V 1/2 Combination Wrench]

Fig. 2. Craftsman "V" 1/2 Combination Wrench, with Inset for Reverse Detail, ca. 1945.

Fig. 2 shows a Craftsman "V" series 1/2 combination wrench, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the raised panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." on the reverse panel. The shank also has a "V" code forged into the reverse, as shown in the inset.

The overall length is 6.1 inches, and the finish is plain steel.


Early "V" 5/8 Combination Wrench

[Craftsman V 5/8 Combination Wrench]

Fig. 3. Craftsman "V" 5/8 Combination Wrench, with Inset for Reverse Detail, ca. 1945.

Fig. 3 shows a Craftsman "V" series 5/8 combination wrench, marked "Forged in U.S.A." on the reverse. As with the previous figure, the raised panels show the double-line logo, and a raised-letter "V" code is forged into the shank.

The overall length is 7.8 inches, and the finish is plain steel.


Early 11/16 Paneled Combination Wrench

[Craftsman Early 11/16 Paneled Combination Wrench]

Fig. 4. Craftsman Early 11/16 Paneled Combination Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail.

Fig. 4 shows a Craftsman 11/16 combination wrench in the paneled style, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the front, with "Forged in U.S.A." on the reverse.

The overall length is 8.5 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

Although this wrench is very similar to the other "V" series examples, no manufacturer's marking was found.


Early "V" 5/8x3/4 Offset Box-End Wrench

[Craftsman Early V 5/8x3/4 Offset Box Wrench]

Fig. 5. Craftsman Early "V" 5/8x3/4 Offset Box-End Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1945.

Fig. 5 shows an early Craftsman 5/8x3/4 offset box wrench in the paneled style, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo and fractional sizes on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and the fractional sizes on the reverse panel. The shank has a forged-in "V" code visible at the right.

The overall length is 10.0 inches, and the finish is cadmium plating, with extensive losses due to wear.

The cadmium finish suggests a manufacturing date in 1945.


Early "V" 3/4x7/8 Offset Box-End Wrench

[Craftsman Early V 3/4x7/8 Offset Box Wrench]

Fig. 6. Craftsman Early "V" 3/4x7/8 Offset Box-End Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. Mid to Late 1940s.

Fig. 6 shows a Craftsman 3/4x7/8 offset box wrench in the paneled style, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." on the reverse panel. The shank has a forged-in "V" code visible at the right.

The overall length is 12.0 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The chrome finish with a forged "V" (rather than stamped) suggests a manufacturing date in the early post-war years.


Early "V" 15/16x1 Offset Box-End Wrench

[Craftsman Early V 15/16x1 Offset Box Wrench]

Fig. 7. Craftsman Early "V" 15/16x1 Offset Box-End Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1945.

Fig. 7 shows a Craftsman 15/16x1 offset box wrench in the paneled style, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." on the reverse panel. The shank has a forged-in "V" code visible at the right.

The overall length is 13.6 inches, and the finish is cadmium plating.

The cadmium finish suggests a manufacturing date in 1945.


Craftsman "P-Circle" 19/32x25/32 Offset Box Wrench

The next several figures show examples of modern raised-panel wrenches marked with a "P-Circle" manufacturer's code, rather than the more common "V" code. We believe that these examples are highly significant, as they prove that Sears had contracted with multiple makers in the early part of the modern era, before selecting Maker "V" as the primary contractor.

[Craftsman P-Circle 19/32x25/32 Offset Box Wrench]

Fig. 8. Craftsman "P-Circle" 19/32x25/32 Offset Box Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1945.

Fig. 8 shows a Craftsman 19/32x25/32 offset box wrench, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the raised panel, and with a P-Circle mark forged into the shank. The reverse is stamped "Forged in U.S.A." on the panel with an "N4" code forged into the shank.

The overall length is 10.4 inches, and the finish is plain steel with traces of cadmium plating.

The "P-Circle" mark is the manufacturer's code for Wilde Tools, a maker known today primarily for their pliers, but a full-line tool maker in the 1930s and 1940s. Examples of their production can be seen in our article on Wilde Tools.


Craftsman "P-Circle" 5/8x3/4 Offset Box Wrench

[Craftsman P-Circle 5/8x3/4 Offset Box Wrench]

Fig. 9. Craftsman "P-Circle" 5/8x3/4 Offset Box Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1945.

Fig. 9 shows a Craftsman 5/8x3/4 offset box wrench, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the raised panel, and with a P-Circle mark forged into the shank. The reverse is stamped "Forged in U.S.A." with a "2" forged into the shank.

The overall length is 10.0 inches, and the finish is plain steel.


Craftsman "P-Circle" 3/8x7/16 Open-End Wrench

[Craftsman P-Circle 3/8x7/16 Open-End Wrench]

Fig. 10. Craftsman "P-Circle" 3/8x7/16 Open-End Wrench, with Inset for Reverse Detail, ca. 1945.

Fig. 10 shows a Craftsman 3/8x7/16 open-end wrench, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the raised panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." on the reverse panel. The reverse is also marked with an "N4" code and a P-Circle mark forged into the shank.

The overall length is 5.1 inches, and the finish is plain steel.


Craftsman "P-Circle" 5/8x3/4 Open-End Wrench

[Craftsman P-Circle 5/8x3/4 Open-End Wrench]

Fig. 11. Craftsman "P-Circle" 5/8x3/4 Open-End Wrench, with Inset for Reverse, ca. 1945.

Fig. 11 shows a Craftsman 5/8x3/4 open-end wrench with raised panels, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." on the reverse panel. The reverse is also marked with an "N4" code and a P-Circle mark forged into the shank.

The overall length is 8.0 inches, and the finish is plain steel, with extensive pitting due to rust.


Craftsman "P-Circle" 25/32x13/16 Open-End Wrench

[Craftsman P-Circle 3/8x7/16 Open-End Wrench]

Fig. 12. Craftsman "P-Circle" 25/32x13/16 Open-End Wrench, with Inset for Reverse Detail, ca. 1945.

Fig. 12 shows a Craftsman 25/32x13/16 open-end wrench with raised panels, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." on the reverse panel. The reverse is also marked with an "E3" code and a P-Circle mark forged into the shank.

The overall length is 8.5 inches, and the finish is cadmium (or possibly zinc) plating.


Wrenches

After the sneak preview in the previous section, we'll start reviewing the various wrench styles of the modern era.


Open-End Wrenches


Early "V" 1/2x9/16 Open-End Wrench

The forged-in "V" code on the shank was soon replaced by a stamped code on the wrench panel, as the next example illustrates.

[Craftsman V 1/2x9/16 Open-End Wrench]

Fig. 13. Craftsman "V" 1/2x9/16 Open-End Wrench, with Inset for Reverse Detail, ca. 1945.

Fig. 13 shows an early example of the Craftsman "V" series, a Craftsman 1/2x9/16 open-end wrench with raised panels. The wrench is stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on raised panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code stamped on the reverse.

The overall length is 5.9 inches, and the finish is cadmium plating with polished faces.


"V" 17x19mm Open-End Wrench

[Craftsman V 17x19mm Open-End Wrench]

Fig. 13B. Craftsman "V" 17x19mm Open-End Wrench, with Inset for Reverse Detail, ca. 1960s.

Fig. 13B shows a Craftsman "V" 17x19mm open-end wrench, marked with "=Craftsman=" stamped on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code on the reverse panel.

As was standard for open-end wrenches, the sizes are stamped on the faces.

The overall length is 8.1 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.


Whitworth (British Standard) Tools

Although less commonly found in the United States, Craftsman did offer wrenches in Whitworth (British Standard) sizes.


"V" 3/8Wx7/16W Whitworth Open-End Wrench

[Craftsman V 3/8Wx7/16W Whitworth Open-End Wrench]

Fig. 14. Craftsman "V" 3/8Wx7/16W Whitworth Open-End Wrench, with Inset for Reverse Detail, ca. Mid 1940s to 1950s.

Fig. 14 shows an example of a Whitworth-sized wrench, a Craftsman 3/8Wx7/16W open-end wrench with raised panels. The wrench is marked with "=Craftsman=" stamped on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code on the reverse.

The overall length is 8.2 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

The opening sizes were measured at 0.72 and 0.83 inches.


Early "V" No. 3 5/8x11/16 Tappet Wrench

Although the "V" code is almost always associated with the Craftsman double-line ("=Craftsman=") logo, this next figure shows an example using the older underlined logo.

[Early Craftsman V No. 3 5/8x11/16 Tappet Wrench]

Fig. 15. Early Craftsman "V" No. 3 5/8x11/16 Tappet Wrench, with Inset for Reverse, ca. 1938 to Mid 1940s.

Fig. 15 shows a Craftsman "V" No. 3 5/8x11/16 tappet wrench, stamped with the Craftsman underline logo and "No. 3" on the left face, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "-V-" code on the right face. The reverse faces are stamped with the fractional sizes.

The overall length is 9.8 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

The use of the "V" code with the Craftsman underline logo suggests that this is early production by Moore Drop Forging, or possibly a transitional form before the tappet wrench markings were updated to the double-line logo. (Later tappet wrenches weren't made with raised panels, so they continued to use the older face marking.)


44474 "V" 3/4x7/8 Tappet Wrench

[Craftsman 44474 V 3/4x7/8 Tappet Wrench]

Fig. 16. Craftsman 44474 "V" 3/4x7/8 Tappet Wrench, with Inset for Reverse, ca. 1970+.

Fig. 16 shows a Craftsman 44474 "V" 3/4x7/8 tappet wrench, stamped with "Craftsman" on the left face, with "U.S.A." and a "V" code plus the model number on the right face. The reverse faces are stamped with the fractional sizes.

The overall length is 9.9 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.


Box-End Wrenches


43919 "V" 1/4x5/16 Box-End Wrench

[Craftsman 43919 V 1/4x5/16 Box-End Wrench]

Fig. 17. Craftsman 43919 "V" 1/4x5/16 Box-End Wrench, with Insets for Reverse Detail and Side View, ca. 1970+.

Fig. 17 shows a Craftsman 43919 "V" 1/4x5/16 box-end wrench with raised panels, marked with "=Craftsman=" and the fractional sizes stamped on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code on the reverse panel.

The overall length is 6.9 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.


"V" 11/16x13/16 Offset Box-End Wrench

[Craftsman V 11/16x13/16 Offset Box-End Wrench]

Fig. 18. Craftsman "V" 11/16x13/16 Offset Box-End Wrench, with Insets for Reverse Detail and Side View, ca. Before 1970.

Fig. 18 shows a Craftsman "V" 11/16x13/16 offset box-end wrench with raised panels, marked with "=Craftsman=" and the fractional sizes stamped on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code on the reverse panel.

The overall length is 10.8 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.


"V" 5/8x11/16 Offset Box-End Wrench with Hexagon Openings

[Craftsman V 5/8x11/16 Offset Box-End Wrench]

Fig. 19. Craftsman "V" 5/8x11/16 Offset Box-End Wrench with Hexagon Openings, with Insets for Reverse Detail and Side View, ca. Before 1970.

Fig. 19 shows a Craftsman "V" 5/8x11/16 offset box-end wrench with hexagon openings. The paneled shank is stamped with "=Craftsman=" and the fractional sizes on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code on the reverse panel.

The overall length is 9.8 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.


"V" 5/8x3/4 Short Box-End Wrench

[Craftsman V 5/8x3/4 Short Box-End Wrench]

Fig. 20. Craftsman "V" 5/8x3/4 Short Box-End Wrench, with Insets for Reverse Detail and Side View, ca. Before 1970.

Fig. 20 shows a Craftsman "V" 5/8x3/4 short box-end wrench with raised panels, stamped with "Craftsman" and the fractional sizes on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code on the reverse panel.

The overall length is 6.4 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

The short panels on this wrench left no room for the standard "=Craftsman=" double-line logo.


"V" 6x8mm Offset Box-End Wrench

[Craftsman V 6x8mm Offset Box-End Wrench]

Fig. 21. Craftsman "V" 6x8mm Offset Box-End Wrench, with Insets for Reverse and Side View, ca. 1960s.

Fig. 21 shows a Craftsman "V" 6x8mm offset box-end wrench with raised panels, stamped with "-Craftsman-" and the fractional sizes on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code on the reverse panel.

The overall length is 5.9 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

The absence of a model number suggests production in the 1960s, when metric sizes were becoming more popular.

The small size of this wrench has forced to Craftsman double-line logo to become a "single-line" logo.


42957 "V" 13x15mm Box-End Wrench

[Craftsman 42957 V 13x15mm Box-End Wrench]

Fig. 22. Craftsman 42957 "V" 13x15mm Box-End Wrench, with Insets for Reverse and Side View, ca. 1970+.

Fig. 22 shows a Craftsman 42957 "V" 13x15mm box-end wrench with raised panels, marked with "=Craftsman=" and the fractional sizes on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." plus a "V" code and model number on the reverse panel.

The overall length is 9.7 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.


Combination Wrenches

In the earlier era combination wrenches were limited to six models with sizes ranging from 7/16 to 3/4. This wrench style became increasingly popular in the modern era, and as combination wrenches replaced open-end and box-end wrenches, the range of sizes was increased substantially.

By 1952 four additional sizes — 3/8, 7/8, 15/16, and 1 inch — had been added, and by 1960 combination wrenches were available in 18 sizes from 1/4 to 1-5/16.


"V" 3/8 Combination Wrench

[Craftsman V 3/8 Combination Wrench]

Fig. 23. Craftsman "V" 3/8 Combination Wrench, with Inset for Reverse, ca. Before 1970.

Fig. 23 shows a Craftsman "V" 3/8 combination wrench with raised panels, marked with "=Craftsman=" and the fractional size on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code on the reverse panel.

The overall length is 4.6 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

The absence of a model number indicates production up to 1969.


7/16 Combination Wrench

[Craftsman 7/16 Combination Wrench]

Fig. 24. Craftsman 7/16 Combination Wrench, with Insets for Reverse and Side View, ca. Before 1970.

Fig. 24 shows a Craftsman 7/16 combination wrench with raised panels, stamped with "=Craftsman=" and the fractional size on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." on the reverse panel.

The overall length is 5.4 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

The absence of a marked "V" code on this example is unusual and somewhat puzzling — possibly there was an error in setting up the marking machine, and the "V" fell off the end of the panel.


44696 "V" 9/16 Combination Wrench

[Craftsman 44696 V 9/16 Combination Wrench]

Fig. 25. Craftsman 44696 "V" 9/16 Combination Wrench, with Insets for Reverse and Side Views, ca. 1970+.

Fig. 25 shows a Craftsman 44696 "V" 9/16 combination wrench with raised panels, marked with "=Craftsman=" and the fractional size on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." plus the "V" code and model number on the reverse panel.

The overall length is 7.1 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

The marked model number indicates production in 1970 or later.


"V" 14mm Combination Wrench

The demand for metric sizes increased during the 1960s as imported cars became more common.

[Craftsman V 14mm Combination Wrench]

Fig. 26. Craftsman "V" 14mm Combination Wrench, with Inset for Reverse, ca. 1960s.

Fig. 26 shows a Craftsman "V" 14mm combination wrench with raised panels, marked with "=Craftsman=" and the metric size on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code on the reverse panel.

The overall length is 6.8 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

The absence of a marked model number indicates production before 1970, and the metric sizing suggests 1960s production.


"BF" 5/8 Combination Wrench

Although Maker "V" dominated the production of Craftsman tools in the modern era, some other manufacturers did produce Craftsman wrenches in the standard paneled design. This next example is from a Japanese maker using the "BF" manufacturer's code, although the specific manufacturer is not yet known.

[Craftsman BF 5/8 Combination Wrench]

Fig. 27. Craftsman "BF" 5/8 Combination Wrench, with Insets for Reverse and Side View, ca. 1960s+.

Fig. 27 shows a Craftsman "BF" 5/8 combination wrench with raised panels, stamped with "=Craftsman=" and the fractional size on the front panel, with "Chrome Molybdenum" and "BF Japan" plus the fractional size on the reverse panel.

The overall length is 7.8 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The top inset shows a side view of the wrench. Note the rounded and polished side of the open end, an extra finishing touch provided by this maker.


Specialty Wrenches


"V" 1/2 Flex-Box Combination Wrench

Flex-box combination wrenches are a variation of the standard combination wrench in which the box end is replaced by a socket attached with a flexible connection. The socket allows the wrench to reach recessed nuts that are inaccessible to a standard wrench, and the flexible connection allows operation at any angle, to help with avoiding obstacles.

Craftsman flex-box combination wrenches were offered in six sizes in the 1957 catalog and have remained as part of the Craftsman line since then.

[Craftsman V 1/2 Flex-Box Combination Wrench]

Fig. 28A. Craftsman "V" 1/2 Flex-Box Combination Wrench, with Insets for Reverse Detail and Side Views, ca. Late 1950s to 1960s.

Fig. 28A shows a Craftsman "V" 1/2 flex-box combination wrench, stamped with "=Craftsman=" and the fractional size on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code on the reverse panel.

The overall length (fully extended) is 8.2 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.


42545 "V" 5/8 Flex-Box Combination Wrench

[Craftsman 42545 V 5/8 Flex-Box Combination Wrench]

Fig. 28B. Craftsman 42545 "V" 5/8 Flex-Box Combination Wrench, with Insets for Reverse Detail and Side Views, ca. 1970+.

Fig. 28B shows a Craftsman 42545 "V" 5/8 flex-box combination wrench, marked with "=Craftsman=" and the fractional size stamped on the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." plus a "V" code and the model number on the reverse panel.

The overall length (fully extended) is 9.2 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.


"V" 9/16x5/8 Battery Wrench

[Craftsman V 9/16x5/8 Battery Wrench]

Fig. 29. Craftsman "V" 9/16x5/8 Battery Wrench, with Insets for Reverse and Side Views, ca. Late 1940s+.

Fig. 29 shows a Craftsman "V" 9/16x5/8 box-end wrench for battery terminal service, marked with "Craftsman" and the fractional sizes forged into the shank, with a "V" code plus "Battery Wrench" and "U.S.A." forged into the reverse.

The overall length is 6.0 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.


Sockets and Drive Tools

We have an extensive collection of Craftsman "V" series sockets and drive tools and will be adding them to this section, as time permits.


Early Ratchet Style


"V" 1/2-Drive Ratchet

[Craftsman V 1/2-Drive Ratchet]

Fig. 30. Craftsman "V" 1/2-Drive Ratchet, with Insets for Reverse and Side Views, ca. Late 1940s to 1950s.

Fig. 30 shows a Craftsman "V" 1/2-drive ratchet, stamped with the "Craftsman" double-line logo on the raised panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code on the reverse panel. (Note that the markings are oriented upside-down relative to later production.) The shank also has a forged-in "B" code near the head.

The overall length is 9.7 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.


V-Shaped Shifters

In 1959 the Craftsman ratchet line adopted a distinctive V-shaped shift lever, based on a design described by patent #D185,651, issued to R.W. Vose in 1959 with assignment to Moore Drop Forging.


"V" 1/2-Drive Ratchet with "V"-Shaped Shifter

[Craftsman V 1/2-Drive Ratchet with V-Shaped Shifter]

Fig. 31. Craftsman "V" 1/2-Drive Ratchet with "V"-Shaped Shifter, with Insets for Reverse and Side Views, ca. 1959 to 1960s.

Fig. 31 shows a Craftsman 1/2-drive ratchet with a "V"-shaped shifter, stamped with the "Craftsman" double-line logo on the raised panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code on the reverse panel.

The overall length is 10.3 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The ratchet head is fitted with an oil hole closed by a steel ball, as can be seen in the middle inset.

Although not marked with a patent notice, the design of the V-shaped shifter is described by patent #D185,651, issued to R.W. Vose in 1959 with assignment to Moore Drop Forging.


"V" 3/8-Drive Ratchet with "V"-Shaped Shifter

[Craftsman V 3/8-Drive Ratchet with V-Shaped Shifter]

Fig. 32. Craftsman "V" 3/8-Drive Ratchet with "V"-Shaped Shifter, with Insets for Reverse and Side Views, ca. 1959 to 1960s.

Fig. 32 shows a Craftsman 3/8-drive ratchet with a "V"-shaped shifter, stamped with the "Craftsman" double-line logo on the raised panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code on the reverse panel.

The overall length is 6.8 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

Although not marked with a patent notice, the design of the V-shaped shifter is described by patent #D185,651, issued to R.W. Vose in 1959 with assignment to Moore Drop Forging.


"V" 1/4-Drive Ratchet with "V"-Shaped Shifter

[Craftsman V 1/4-Drive Ratchet with V-Shaped Shifter]

Fig. 33. Craftsman "V" 1/4-Drive Ratchet with "V"-Shaped Shifter, with Insets for Reverse and Side Views, ca. 1959 to 1960s.

Fig. 33 shows a Craftsman 1/4-drive ratchet with a "V"-shaped shifter, stamped with the "Craftsman" double-line logo on the raised panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code on the reverse panel.

The overall length is 5.2 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

Although not marked with a patent notice, the design of the V-shaped shifter is described by patent #D185,651, issued to R.W. Vose in 1959 with assignment to Moore Drop Forging.


Quick-Release Ratchets

In 1965 Sears began offering Craftsman ratchets with a convenient quick-release button, based on a design described by patent #3,208,318, filed by P.M. Roberts in 1964 and issued in 1965.


"V" 3/8-Drive Quick-Release Ratchet

[Craftsman V 3/8-Drive Quick-Release Ratchet]

Fig. 34. Craftsman "V" 3/8-Drive Quick-Release Ratchet, with Insets for Reverse and Side Views, ca. 1965-1970.

Fig. 34 shows a Craftsman 3/8-drive quick-release ratchet, stamped with the "Craftsman" double-line logo on the raised panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code on the reverse panel. The reverse panel is also stamped with a "Pat. No. 3208318" patent notice.

The overall length is 6.8 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The patent notice refers to patent #3,208,318, filed by P.M. Roberts in 1964 and issued in 1965. This is the classic patent for the quick-release mechanism.


Quick-Release Dual-Pawl Ratchets

In the late 1960s Sears began offering Craftsman ratchets with a dual-pawl mechanism for ultra fine action, combined with a quick-release button for extra convenience. These ratchets were based on patents #3,467,231 and #3,532,013, issued to H.J. Haznar in 1969 and 1970 respectively, and assigned to the Moore Drop Forging Company.


"V" 1/2-Drive Quick-Release Ratchet with Dual-Pawl Mechanism

[Craftsman V 1/2-Drive Quick-Release Dual-Pawl Ratchet]

Fig. 35. Craftsman "V" 1/2-Drive Quick-Release Dual-Pawl Ratchet, with Insets for Reverse and Side Views, ca. 1968-1970.

Fig. 35 shows a 1/2-drive Craftsman quick-release ratchet with a dual-pawl mechanism, stamped with the "Craftsman" double-line logo on the raised panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "=V=" code on the reverse panel. The reverse panel is also stamped with a "Patent Pending" notice.

The overall length is 10.4 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The pending status refers to patents #3,467,231 and #3,532,013, issued to H.J. Haznar in 1969 and 1970 respectively, with assignment to the Moore Drop Forging Company.

Note that this ratchet is not marked with a model number, but that a similar Craftsman 43187 "V" 1/4-Drive Ratchet also has a patent pending marking and is marked with the model number. These examples provide evidence that Craftsman model number markings were added in the 1968-1970 time frame.


43788 "V" 3/8-Drive Quick-Release Ratchet with Dual-Pawl Mechanism

[Craftsman 43788 V 3/8-Drive Quick-release Ratchet]

Fig. 36. Craftsman 43788 "V" 3/8-Drive Quick Release Ratchet, with Insets for Reverse and Side Views, ca. 1970s.

Fig. 36 shows a Craftsman 43788 3/8-drive quick-release ratchet with a dual-pawl mechanism, stamped "Craftsman" on the raised panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "-V-" code on the reverse panel. The reverse panel is also stamped with "U.S. Pats. 3467231 3532013" and "Can. Patented 1971" patent notices.

The overall length is 6.8 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The first patent #3,467,231 was filed by H.J. Haznar in 1968 and issued in 1969, with assignment to the Moore Drop Forging Company. The describes a pawl-reversing mechanism for fine-tooth ratchets.

The second patent #3,532,013 was filed by H.J. Haznar in 1968 and issued in 1970, again with assignment to the Moore Drop Forging Company. This patent describes a quick-release mechanism adapted to fine-tooth ratchets.


43187 "V" 1/4-Drive Quick-Release Ratchet with Dual-Pawl Mechanism

[Craftsman 43187 V 1/4-Drive Quick-release Ratchet]

Fig. 37. Craftsman 43187 "V" 3/8-Drive Quick Release Ratchet, with Insets for Reverse and Side Views, ca. 1968-1970.

Fig. 37 shows a Craftsman 43187 1/4-drive quick-release ratchet with a dual-pawl mechanism, stamped with the "Craftsman" double-line logo on the raised panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "-V-" code on the reverse panel. The reverse panel is also stamped with a "Patent Pending" patent notice.

The overall length is 5.2 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The pending status refers to patents #3,467,231 and #3,532,013, issued to H.J. Haznar in 1969 and 1970 respectively, with assignment to the Moore Drop Forging Company.


Pliers and Cutters

As Craftsman tools entered the modern era, Sears adopted the "Nested Diamonds" pattern as their standard gripping pattern for pliers. This appears to have been an active decision on Sears' part, as even Wilde was forced to switch from their preferred and distinctive "Rope Banded" pattern to the Nested Diamonds pattern. By 1960 though Sears had relented, and Wilde production switched back to their traditional "Rope Banded" pattern.


8 Inch Angle-Nose Pliers

[Craftsman 8 Inch Angle-Nose Gripping Pliers]

Fig. 38. Craftsman 8 Inch Angle-Nose Gripping Pliers, with Insets for Handle and Marking Detail, ca. 1945.

Fig. 38 shows a pair of Craftsman 8 inch angle-nose gripping pliers, marked with a transitional form of the double-line logo resembling "== U.S.A. ==". No manufacturer's code was found on these pliers.

The overall length is 8.0 inches.

The finish is polished steel with no plating, which together with the double-line logo suggests a manufacturing date around 1945.

The handle pattern closely resembles the "Nested Diamonds" pattern found on many Craftsman Vanadium pliers. (See our article on Early Craftsman Pliers for examples.) The design of the pliers resembles the Wilde Wrench Pliers shown on another page.


4507 7 Inch Combination Side-Cutting Pliers

[Craftsman 4507 7 Inch Combination Side-Cutting Pliers]

Fig. 39. Craftsman 4507 7 Inch Combination Side-Cutting Pliers, with Insets for Reverse, Side View, and Marking Detail, ca. 1949 to 1960s.

Fig. 39 shows a pair of Craftsman 4507 combination side-cutting pliers, stamped with "Craftsman" and a B-Circle manufacturer's code, with "4507" and "USA" below (see lower right inset).

The overall length is 7.5 inches, and the finish is plain steel, with scattered pitting due to rust.

Note that the rivet is flush with the surface on the cutting side, allowing the pliers to cut close to a surface.

A review of the Craftsman catalogs found that the 4507 pliers were first listed in 1947 under the Dunlap brand, and then offered in 1949 under the Craftsman brand. The 4507 pliers remained available at least through 1968, the current limit of our catalogs.


4-Position 10 Inch Waterpump Pliers

[Craftsman 4-Position 10 Inch Waterpump Pliers]

Fig. 40. Craftsman 4-Position 10 Inch Waterpump Pliers, with Inset for Reverse Detail, ca. 1947.

Fig. 40 shows a pair of Craftsman 10 inch waterpump pliers with a distinctive 4-position adjustment mechanism. The pliers are stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the handle, with "Forged in U.S.A." and an N-Square manufacturer's code on the reverse.

The overall length is 9.9 inches fully extended, and the finish is chrome plating.

The adjustment mechanism uses a tabbed pivot post operating in slotted holes. To change the setting, the handles are opened wide to align the tabs with the slots, allowing the handles to be separated and then reinserted in the desired hole.

Other tools with the N-Square manufacturer's code include punches and chisels, but the manufacturer associated with the code is not yet known.

Currently our only catalog reference for these pliers is the 1947 Craftsman tools catalog. The catalog notes the advantage of the adjustment mechanism in preventing accidental changes of the setting.


Craftsman 4476 "B" Battery Pliers with Nested-Diamond Pattern

[Craftsman 4476 Battery Pliers]

Fig. 41. Craftsman 4476 Battery Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Late 1940s to Early 1960s.

Fig. 41 shows a pair of Craftsman 4476 battery pliers with the Nested-Diamond handle pattern, stamped with "Craftsman" and "4476 USA", and with a B-Circle manufacturer's code.

The overall length is 7.4 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The upper inset shows the "Nested Diamonds" gripping pattern on the handles, which remained in use at least through the early 1960s.

These pliers are copies of the more familiar Wilde Battery Pliers, but were made with slightly different production and marking characteristics. Note that the parting line from the forging is visible through the impressed handle pattern.

Model 4476 battery pliers in this angle-nose style were listed in the 1947 Craftsman tool catalog, and this model continued to be offered through the 1962 catalog. Note though that the model number marking on these pliers is unusual for this era.

The manufacturer of the B-Circle code has not yet been identified.


Production by Wilde Tool

The Wilde Tool Company was the dominant supplier of pliers for the Craftsman brand in the post-war era. Wilde production can be generally be recognized by the rope-banded gripping pattern on the handles, and by a P-Circle manufacturer's code stamped on (or forged into) the tools.

In this section we'll look at examples of Craftsman pliers presumed to be contract production by Wilde, including many examples with rope-banded patterns on the handles.

Additional information on Wilde can be found in our article on the Wilde Tool Company.


Craftsman [4476] Battery Pliers with Nested-Diamond Pattern

[Craftsman 4476 Battery Pliers]

Fig. 42. Craftsman [4476] Battery Pliers, with Inset for Side View, ca. Late 1940s to Early 1960s.

Fig. 42 shows a pair of Craftsman [4476] battery pliers with the Nested-Diamond handle pattern, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo and a P-Circle manufacturer's code.

The overall length is 7.4 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The upper inset shows the "Nested Diamonds" gripping pattern on the handles, which remained in use at least through the early 1960s.

Battery pliers in this angle-nose style were listed as model 4476 in the 1947 Craftsman tool catalog, and this model continued to be offered through the 1962 catalog. The P-Circle code identifies the maker as Wilde Tool, and similar but much earlier pliers made by Wilde can be seen as the Early Craftsman Battery Pliers.


Craftsman 11 Inch Waterpump Pliers with Rope-Banded Handles

[Craftsman 11 Inch Waterpump Pliers]

Fig. 43. Craftsman 11 Inch Waterpump Pliers, with Inset for Handle Pattern, ca. 1960s.

Fig. 43 shows a fairly recent pair of Craftsman 11 inch waterpump pliers with the rope-banded handle pattern, marked with the Craftsman double-line logo but without a model number. The pliers are also marked with a forged-in "P" code on the underside of the handles (not shown).

The overall length is 10.8 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The pliers are marked with the Craftsman double-line logo, but no model number is marked. Model numbers were generally marked on Craftsman tools after the late 1960s to early 70s, so these pliers were probably made in the 1960s.

The rope-banded handles and forged-in "P" code indicate production by Wilde.


Craftsman 6 Inch "Arc-Joint" Tongue-and-Groove Angle-Nose Pliers

The next several figures show examples of Craftsman "Arc-Joint" tongue-and-groove pliers. The tongue-and-groove design dates back to the classic 1934 patent #1,950,362 by the Champion De Arment (now Channellock) company. This patent expired in the early 1950s, paving the way for competitors to make use of the design. Sears first offered "Arc-Joint" tongue-and-groove pliers in the 1953 Craftsman catalog, and the rear cover illustrates Craftsman "Arc-Joint" pliers with the P-Circle code visible.

[Craftsman 6 Inch Tongue-and-Groove Angle-Nose Pliers]

Fig. 44. Craftsman 6 Inch Tongue-and-Groove Angle-Nose Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1953-1959.

Fig. 44 shows an earlier pair of Craftsman 6 inch tongue-and-groove angle-nose pliers with the older "Nested Diamonds" geometric gripping pattern on the handles. The pliers are stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo near the pivot, with a P-Circle logo below.

The overall length is 6.8 inches fully extended, and the finish is chrome plating.

The stamped P-Circle code identifies the maker as Wilde, and the unusual (for Wilde) use of the geometric gripping pattern suggests transitional production.

The Craftsman tool catalog illustrations show that this "Nested Diamonds" gripping pattern remained in use on some pliers into the 1960s, but the tongue-and-groove models had switched to the rope-banded pattern by 1960.


[Craftsman 6 Inch Tongue-and-Groove Angle-Nose Pliers]

Fig. 45. Craftsman 6 Inch Tongue-and-Groove Angle-Nose Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1960s.

Fig. 45 shows a later pair of Craftsman 6 inch tongue-and-groove angle-nose pliers with a rope-banded gripping pattern on the handles. The pliers are stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo near the pivot, with a forged-in "P" code on the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 6.8 inches fully extended, and the finish is chrome plating.

The forged-in "P" code on the underside of the handles represents the P-Circle manufacturer's code for Wilde. By 1960 the Craftsman tool catalogs had illustrations of these tongue-and-groove pliers with the rope-banded gripping pattern.


Craftsman 10 Inch "Arc-Joint" Tongue-and-Groove Waterpump Pliers

[Craftsman 10 Inch Arc-Joint Tongue-and-Groove Waterpump Pliers]

Fig. 46. Craftsman 10 Inch "Arc-Joint" Tongue-and-Groove Waterpump Pliers, with Insets for Handle Pattern and Marking Detail, ca. 1960s.

Fig. 46 shows a pair of Craftsman 10 inch "Arc-Joint" tongue-and-groove waterpump pliers with the rope-banded pattern, marked with the Craftsman double-line logo, but without a model number. The underside of the handles is also marked with a forged-in "P" code (see left inset), representing the P-Circle manufacturer's code for Wilde.

The overall length is 10.0 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The rope-banded gripping pattern (the long-standing "house pattern" for Wilde) was used for Arc-Joint pliers after 1960. The lack of a model number marking suggests production before 1970 or so.


Craftsman 6.5 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers

[Craftsman 6.5 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers]

Fig. 47. Craftsman 6.5 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1960s.

Fig. 47 shows a pair of Craftsman 6.5 inch slip-joint combination pliers with the rope-banded pattern, stamped with the double-line logo and a small "P" code near the pivot, and with "Alloy Steel" forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 6.7 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The lower inset shows the forged-in "P" code on the underside of the handles, representing the P-Circle manufacturer's code for Wilde.


Production by J.P. Danielson

The J.P. Danielson Company produced pliers for the Fulton, Merit, and Dunlap brands during the 1930s, and later produced at least some models for the Craftsman brand. After 1947 Danielson operated as a division of Plomb Tool (later Proto Tools).

The later production by Danielson was marked with an "LC" manufacturer's code.

Additional information can be found in our article on the J.P. Danielson Company.


Craftsman 4732 8 Inch Slip-Joint Hose-Clamp Combination Pliers

[Craftsman 4732 8 Inch Slip-Joint Hose-Clamp Combination Pliers]

Fig. 48. Craftsman 4732 8 Inch Slip-Joint Hose-Clamp Combination Pliers, with Insets for Side View, Jaw, and Marking Detail, 1965.

Fig. 48 shows a pair of Craftsman 4732 8 inch slip-joint hose-clamp combination pliers, stamped with "Craftsman" and the model number to the right of the pivot, with an "LC" code and "USA" below. The handle also has a forged-in code "C35" faintly visible on the shoulder.

The overall length is 8.6 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The jaws of the pliers have a drilled recess and milled grooves to hold the ends of a hose-clamp spring (see middle inset), adding another useful feature to these otherwise conventional combination pliers.

The handles of these pliers have a double-chevron gripping pattern, similar to the older Herringbone pattern used by Danielson for a number of years. An example of this pattern on Proto production can be seen as the Proto 202 Combination Pliers. The forged-in "C35" is a Danielson date code probably indicates production in 1965, although a later decade may be possible.


Adjustable Wrenches

In the post-war years Craftsman adjustable wrenches were supplied by J.H. Williams and by other makers not yet identified.


Craftsman "Y-Circle" 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench

The next two figures show examples of a series of adjustable wrenches offered during the 1950s, notable for the distinctive placement of the hanging hole in the interior of the shank, rather than at the extreme end. This style of adjustable wrench was still illustrated in the 1957 Craftsman catalog, but was not offered in 1960.

[Craftsman Y-Circle 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench]

Fig. 49. Craftsman "Y-Circle" 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1950s.

Fig. 49 shows a Craftsman 8 inch adjustable wrench, marked with "8 In." and the Craftsman double-line logo forged into the front, with a "Forged in U.S.A." and a Y-Circle logo forged into the reverse.

The overall length is 8.1 inches, and the maximum opening is 0.9 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.47 inches.

The finish is plain steel with traces of plating, possibly zinc or cadmium.

Note that the hanging hole is located in the interior of the depressed panel, rather than at the extreme end.


Craftsman "Y-Circle" 12 Inch Adjustable Wrench

[Craftsman Y-Circle 12 Inch Adjustable Wrench]

Fig. 50. Craftsman "Y-Circle" 12 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1950s.

Fig. 50 shows a Craftsman 12 inch adjustable wrench, marked with "12 In." and the Craftsman double-line logo forged into the front, with a "Forged in U.S.A." and a Y-Circle logo forged into the reverse.

The overall length is 12.1 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.3 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.72 inches.

The wrench has a bright plated finish that resembles zinc, and the finish is soft enough to leave a mark on paper.

The upper inset shows a close-up of the Y-Circle logo forged into the shank.

We hope to be able to identify the manufacturer behind the Y-Circle code in the near future. One construction detail noted is that the screw pin is threaded on the outside (slotted) end, the type of pin generally used by Danielson and Utica. In contrast, Crescent and Diamond used a screw pin threaded on the inside end.


Craftsman 8 Inch Locking Adjustable Wrench

The next several figures show examples of Williams adjustable wrenches produced for the Craftsman brand.

[Craftsman 8 Inch Locking Adjustable Wrench]

Fig. 51. Craftsman 8 Inch Locking Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1955-1967.

Fig. 51 shows a Craftsman 8 inch adjustable wrench with a locking pin, marked with "Patd in U.S.A." and the Craftsman double-line logo forged into the front, with "Made in U.S.A." and an AZ-Circle logo forged into the reverse.

The overall length is 8.2 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.0 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.47 inches.

The finish is chrome plating, with minor losses due to rust and wear.

The middle inset shows a close-up of the AZ-Circle logo forged into the shank.

The upper inset shows a side view of the wrench, illustrating the square shoulder used for the sliding jaw and keyway. The square shoulder is a feature patented by J.H. Williams in the 1930s (see patent #2,112,840) and is not known to have been used by any other manufacturers.

The patent notice refers to patent #2,719,449, filed by W.J. Johnson in 1953 and issued in 1955. This patent describes a locking mechanism for adjustable wrenches, actuated by pushing a locking pin (visible in the photograph) through the thumb knurl. An example of a Williams wrench with this locking mechanism can be seen as the Williams APL-6 Adjustable Wrench.


Craftsman 10 Inch Locking Adjustable Wrench

[Craftsman 10 Inch Locking Adjustable Wrench]

Fig. 52. Craftsman 10 Inch Locking Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1955-1967.

Fig. 52 shows a Craftsman 10 inch adjustable wrench with a locking pin, marked with "Patd in U.S.A." and the Craftsman double-line logo forged into the front, with "Made in U.S.A." and an AZ-Circle logo forged into the reverse.

The overall length is 10.2 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.2 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.60 inches.

The finish is chrome plating, with some losses due to rust and pitting.

The middle inset shows a close-up of the AZ-Circle logo forged into the shank.

The upper inset shows a side view of the wrench, illustrating the square shoulder used for the sliding jaw and keyway. The square shoulder is a feature patented by J.H. Williams in the 1930s (see patent #2,112,840) and is not known to have been used by any other manufacturers.

The patent notice refers to patent #2,719,449, filed by W.J. Johnson in 1953 and issued in 1955. This patent describes a locking mechanism for adjustable wrenches, actuated by pushing a locking pin (visible in the photograph) through the thumb knurl. An example of a Williams wrench with this locking mechanism can be seen as the Williams APL-6 Adjustable Wrench.


Craftsman 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench

[Craftsman 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench]

Fig. 53. Craftsman 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1968-1972.

Fig. 53 shows a Craftsman 8 inch adjustable wrench, stamped "Forged" on the front with "Made in U.S.A." and "JW - Alloy" on the reverse. The reverse shank also shows a forged-in code "L" next to the hole.

The overall length is 8.2 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.0 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.50 inches.

The finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

The upper inset shows a side view of the wrench, and a close look shows the square shoulder for the sliding jaw and keyway. The square shoulder was a patented feature of the J.H. Williams adjustable wrenches, and is not known to have been used by any other manufacturers.

This wrench can be identified as Williams' production by the square-shouldered keyway, and the stamped "JW" code further confirms the maker. The forged-in "L" code has also been observed on J.H. Williams wrenches; see for example the Williams AP-8 "Superjustable" Wrench.

This particular wrench is believed to have been purchased new in the late 1960s to early 1970s, a time before Craftsman began marking model numbers on its tools. The next figure shows a similar wrench with a Craftsman model number.


Craftsman 44604 "JW" 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench

[Craftsman 44604 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench]

Fig. 54. Craftsman 44604 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1970s+.

Fig. 54 shows a somewhat later example of Williams' production, a Craftsman 44604 10 inch adjustable wrench. The shank is stamped with "-Craftsman-" and "Forged" on the front, with "Made in U.S.A." and "JW - Alloy" on the reverse. A forged-in code "L" appears on the reverse as well.

The overall length is 10.2 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.2 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.60 inches.

The finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

The upper inset shows a side view of the wrench, with the square shoulder visible on the sliding jaw and keyway.


Chisels and Punches


Craftsman 3/16 Pin Punch

[Craftsman 3/16 Pin Punch]

Fig. 55. Craftsman 3/16 Pin Punch.

Fig. 55 shows a Craftsman 3/16 pin punch, stamped with the double-line logo and an "N-Square" manufacturer's code.

The overall length is 6.1 inches.

The manufacturer associated with the "N-Square" code is not yet known. This code has also been noted on a Dunlap Punch shown in another article.


Craftsman 3/4 Star Drill

[Craftsman 3/4 Star Drill]

Fig. 56. Craftsman 3/4 Star Drill, with Inset for Marking Detail.

Fig. 56 shows a Craftsman 3/4 star drill, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo and a "G-Circle" manufacturer's code.

The overall length is 11.9 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The manufacturer associated with the "G-Circle" code is not yet known.


Specialty Tools


Craftsman "V" 12 Inch Chain Pipe Wrench

[Craftsman V 12 Inch Chain Pipe Wrench]

Fig. 57. Craftsman "V" 12 Inch Chain Pipe Wrench, with Inset for Reverse Detail, ca. 1960s.

Fig. 57 shows a Craftsman 12 inch chain pipe wrench, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the raised panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and "Pat. No. 2944452" plus a "V" code on the reverse panel.

The overall length of the handle is 12.0 inches, and the length of the chain is 16.3 inches. The finish is chrome plating.

The patent notice refers to patent 2,944,452, filed by R.W. Vose in 1959 and issued in 1960, with assignment to Moore Drop Forging.


Craftsman 8-In-1 Multi-Socket Wrench

[Craftsman 8-In-1 Multi-Socket Wrench]

Fig. 58. Craftsman 8-In-1 Multi-Socket Wrench, with Inset for Reverse Detail, ca. 1954-1968.

Fig. 58 shows a Craftsman 8-In-1 multi-socket wrench, marked with the Craftsman double-line logo on the raised panel, and with the fractional sizes and "Forged in U.S.A." on the reverse panel.

The socket sizes are 7/16, 1/2, 9/16, and 19/32 on the small head, with 5/8, 11/16, 3/4, and 7/8 on the large head.

The overall length is 10.0 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

A close comparison with the Williams No. 1999 Multi-Socket Wrench showed that the tools are virtually identical except for markings, confirming that Williams was the contract manufacturer for Sears for this tool. The small forged-in "T" code to the left of the panel is one of several forge codes used by Williams (the others include B, II, O, and V) and is not interpreted as a Craftsman manufacturer's code.

The Craftsman 8-In-1 wrench was first introduced in the 1954 catalog at a price of $3.98. By 1957 the price had been reduced to $2.98, and the 8-In-1 model remained available at least through 1968, with the price gradually rising to $3.99 in 1968.


Craftsman Snap-Ring Pliers

[Craftsman Snap-Ring Pliers]

Fig. 59. Craftsman Snap-Ring Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail.

Fig. 59 at the left shows a pair of Craftsman snap-ring specialty pliers with rope-banded handles, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo and "USA", and with a small "P" in a circle code.

The overall length is 9.0 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The lower inset shows the forged-in "P" code (in a circular depression) on the inside of the handles. The rope-banded handles and P-Circle code indicate production by Wilde.


Craftsman Brake Spring Pliers

[Craftsman Brake Spring Pliers]

Fig. 60. Craftsman Brake Spring Pliers, with Insets for Construction and Marking Detail.

Fig. 60 shows a pair of Craftsman brake spring pliers, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the upper jaw, with a small P-Circle code below.

The overall length is 13.2 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The P-Circle code indicates production by Wilde.


Craftsman 1/4x5/16 Ratcheting Box Wrench

[Craftsman 1/4x5/16 Ratcheting Box Wrench]

Fig. 61. Craftsman 1/4x5/16 Ratcheting Box Wrench, with Inset for Side View, ca. 1949+.

Fig. 61 shows a Craftsman 1/4x5/16 ratcheting box wrench with raised panels, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the panel. The body is stamped "Made U.S.A." at the left, with "Reg. U.S. Pat. Off." at the right.

The overall length is 4.6 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The construction of the wrench uses symmetrical stamped steel formed panels held together by rivets. The raised panel in the center of each half is a distinctive feature found in the Duro/Indestro production of ratcheting box wrenches.

Ratcheting box wrenches in this design were listed in the Craftsman tool catalogs as early as 1949.


Craftsman 3/8x7/16 Ratcheting Box Wrench

[Craftsman 3/8x7/16 Ratcheting Box Wrench]

Fig. 62. Craftsman 3/8x7/16 Ratcheting Box Wrench, with Inset for Side View, ca. 1949+.

Fig. 62 shows a Craftsman 3/8x7/16 ratcheting box wrench with raised panels, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the panel. The body is stamped "Made U.S.A." at the left, with "Reg. U.S. Pat. Off." and a "D.I." code at the right.

The overall length is 6.2 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The construction of the wrench uses symmetrical stamped steel formed panels held together by rivets. The raised panel in the center of each half is a distinctive feature found in the Duro/Indestro production of ratcheting box wrenches, and the "D.I." code is believed to denote "Duro Indestro".


Craftsman 13/16x7/8 Ratcheting Box Wrench

[Craftsman 13/16x7/8 Ratcheting Box Wrench]

Fig. 63. Craftsman 13/16x7/8 Ratcheting Box Wrench, with Inset for Side View, ca. 1949+.

Fig. 63 shows a Craftsman 13/16x7/8 ratcheting box wrench with raised panels, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the panel. The body is stamped "Made U.S.A." at the left, with "Reg. U.S. Pat. Off." code at the right.

The overall length is 9.9 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The construction of the wrench uses symmetrical stamped steel formed panels held together by rivets. The raised panel in the center of each half is a distinctive feature found in the Duro/Indestro production of ratcheting box wrenches.

Note that this particular example is not marked with a "D.I." code seen in the previous figure.


Other Brands

Sears continued to use the Dunlap brand for economy tools into the early 1960s, but by 1964 the Craftsman catalog no longer included Dunlap tools.

Other brands used for tools included "Companion" and the "Sears" name itself.


Dunlap Tools

Dunlap brand economy tools continued to be offered until about 1963.


Dunlap "LC" 3/8x7/16 Offset Box-End Wrench

[Dunlap LC 3/8x7/16 Offset Box Wrench]

Fig. 64. Dunlap "LC" 3/8x7/16 Offset Box Wrench, with Insets for Side View, Reverse, and Marking Detail, ca. 1950s.

Fig. 64 shows a Dunlap 3/8x7/16 offset box wrench with gently-sloped depressed panels, marked with "Dunlap" and the fractional sizes forged into the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and the fractional sizes forged into the reverse. The front panel also has a forged-in code "X" at the left and "LC" at the right end, seen as a close-up in the middle inset.

The overall length is 6.9 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The construction of this wrench closely resembles the Lectrolite "TruFit" wrenches produced in the late 1940s and 1950s, as for example the TruFit 3/4x25/32 Offset Box Wrench. Note in particular the gently-sloped depressed panels and the increased width of the shank after the offset. The forged-in "LC" code is believed to represent "Lectrolite Corporation".


Dunlap "V" 11/16x3/4 Offset Box-End Wrench

[Dunlap V 11/16x3/4 Offset Box Wrench]

Fig. 65. Dunlap "V" 11/16x3/4 Offset Box Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail.

Fig. 65 shows a Dunlap 11/16x3/4 offset box wrench with depressed panels, marked with "Dunlap" and the fractional sizes forged into the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code forged into the reverse.

The overall length is 11.2 inches, and the finish is plain steel.


Dunlap "LC" 5/8 Combination Wrench

[Dunlap LC 5/8 Combination Wrench]

Fig. 66. Dunlap "LC" 5/8 Combination Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1950s to 1960s.

Fig. 66 shows a Dunlap 5/8 combination wrench with depressed panels, marked with "Dunlap" and the fractional sizes forged into the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and the fractional sizes forged into the reverse. The front panel also has a forged-in code "T" at the left and "LC" at the right, shown as a close-up in the middle inset.

The overall length is 7.1 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The construction of this wrench closely resembles the Lectrolite "TruFit" combination wrenches produced in the late 1940s and 1950s, as for example the TruFit 9/16 Combination Wrench. Note in particular the gently-sloped depressed panels and the increased width of the shank at the junction with the box end. The forged-in "LC" code is believed to represent "Lectrolite Corporation".


Dunlap 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench

[Dunlap 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench]

Fig. 67. Dunlap 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail.

Fig. 67 shows a Dunlap 10 inch adjustable wrench, marked with the Dunlap double-line logo and "Dependable Quality" forged into the shank, with "Forged in U.S.A." forged into the reverse. The shank is also marked with a forged-in Y-Circle logo, visible at the right near the hanging hole.

The overall length is 10.0 inches and the maximum opening is 1.1 inches. The finish is chrome plating.

The forged-in Y-Circle logo is believed to be the manufacturer's code, but the maker has not yet been identified. The Y-Circle logo also appears on Craftsman adjustable wrenches, as for example the Craftsman "Y-Circle" 12 Inch Adjustable Wrench.


Sears Brand Tools

In more recent years Sears has used its own name for a line of economy tools, similar to the Dunlap tools of earlier years.


Sears "BF" 11/16 Combination Wrench

[Sears BF 11/16 Combination Wrench]

Fig. 68. Sears "BF" 11/16 Combination Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1960s+.

Fig. 68 shows a Sears 11/16 combination wrench with depressed panels, marked with "Sears" and the fractional sizes forged into the front panel, with "Drop Forged" and "BF Japan" plus the fractional sizes forged into the reverse.

The overall length is 7.8 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The Japanese maker associated with the "BF" code has not yet been identified. The "BF" code can also be found on Craftsman wrenches, often with a marking for molybdenum alloy steel.


Sours: http://alloy-artifacts.org/craftsman-maker-v.html

Craftsman set sears ratchet wrench

Craftsman Ratchet Wrench Set Standard Recipes

CRAFTSMAN 4-PIECE RATCHETING OPEN END WRENCH SET PRODUCT ...
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2012-10-29  · The Craftsman 4-Piece Ratcheting Open End Wrench Set combines ratchets with an open-end wrench. It's great for DIY or automotive works. The patented tooth de...
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CRAFTSMAN RATCHETING COMBINATION WRENCH SET - …
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This combination wrench set by Craftsman® features a polished full chrome finish for corrosion resistance and large markings to help you quickly identify the sizes you are looking for. Also, the 12-point socket design allows for quick engagement with fasteners, ideal for lightweight jobs. Moreover, the box end has a 15° offset to offer additional knuckle clearance and a 72 teeth ratcheting ...
From rona.ca
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CRAFTSMAN 7 PC. METRIC RATCHETING | LOWE'S CANADA

Metric Ratcheting. The 7 pc Metric Ratcheting Combination Wrench Set offers a number of applications from the standard bolt turning to working on specific automotive repairs. Full polish chrome finish for corrosion resistance. 12 point box end for quick engagement with fastener. 15-degree box end offset for additional knuckle clearance.
From lowes.ca
Brand CRAFTSMAN
Length Measurement Set
Finish Polished chrome
Size Set
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CRAFTSMAN 7-PIECE UNIVERSAL RATCHETING WRENCH SET STANDARD ...

Craftsman 7-piece Universal Ratcheting Wrench Set Standard: Amazon.ca: Tools & Home Improvement
From amazon.ca
Reviews 94
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CRAFTSMAN RATCHETING SOCKET HAND WRENCHES FOR SALE | EBAY

Get the best deal for Craftsman Ratcheting Socket Hand Wrenches from the largest online selection at eBay.com. | Browse our daily deals for even more savings! | Free shipping on many items!
From ebay.ca
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CRAFTSMAN SOCKET WRENCH SET | EBAY

New Listing Vtg CRAFTSMAN METRIC MM 19 Piece 1/4 & 3/8" Drive Socket Set Ratchet Wrench USA. Pre-Owned. C $15.78. Top Rated Seller Top Rated Seller. 2 bids · Time left 6d 2h left. from United States. 5 S Y p o Z n 5 s o r e d 2 0. New Listing Craftsman Socket Set 3/8 SAE/MM Chrome Hand Tools. Pre-Owned. C $37.88. or Best Offer +C $35.46 shipping estimate. from United States. T S 4 p …
From ebay.ca
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CRAFTSMAN METRIC RATCHET WRENCHES & SETS AT LOWES.COM

item number 8. TEKTON 7-mm 6-Point Metric Flexible Head Ratchet Wrench. it has a rating of 5.0 with 1 reviews. TEKTON 7-mm 6-Point Metric Flexible Head Ratchet Wrench. TEKTON 7-mm 6-Point Metric Flexible Head Ratchet Wrench. item number 9. CRAFTSMAN 7-Piece Set 12-Point Metric Ratchet Wrench Set.
From lowes.com
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CRAFTSMAN RACHET WRENCH SET | EBAY

Find great deals on eBay for craftsman rachet wrench set. Shop with confidence.
From ebay.ca
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CRAFTSMAN WRENCHES: STANDARD - SEARS

Get the Craftsman Wrenches sets you need to tackle the toughest jobs at Sears. Skip Navigation. Sears home ... Ratcheting Wrench (65) No (10) Yes (65) No (10) Yes. Set (85) Open Stock (8) Set (85) Open Stock (8) Set. Price (80) $0 - $25 (5) $25 & above. Please input a valid price. to (80) $0 - $25 (5) $25 & above. Length (12) Long (52) Standard (9) Stubby (12) Long (52) Standard (9) Stubby ...
From sears.com
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CRAFTSMAN 7 PIECE WRENCH SET - HANDICRAFT-ART.NET

CRAFTSMAN 7piece Standard (SAE) Combination … 8 hours ago Lowes.com Show details . The CRAFTSMAN® 7-piece Standard (SAE) Combination Wrench Set in Pouch features the iconic raised panel combination wrench design. Backed by Craftsman's Full Lifetime Warranty, this set delivers the quality and durability expected from the Craftsman name. This set includes the following sizes: 1/4 …
From handicraft-art.net
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11 PC. SAE RATCHETING COMBINATION WRENCH SET - CRAFTSMAN

SAE Ratcheting Combination Wrench Set - CMMT12077 | CRAFTSMAN close. Email Address* ... SAE Stubby Ratcheting Combination Wrench Set offers a number of applications from the standard bolt turning to working on specific automotive repairs. SHOP NOW. CMMT12077 Features . CORROSION RESISTANCE: Full Polish Chrome Finish; QUICK ENGAGEMENT: 12 Point Box End with fastener; …
From craftsman.com
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WRENCHES & WRENCH SETS | CRAFTSMAN

SAE Gunmetal Chrome Long-Panel Wrench Set. 11 pc. Metric Gunmetal Chrome Long-Panel Wrench Set. 0.0 out of 5 stars. 7 pc. SAE Gunmetal Chrome Long-Panel Wrench Set. 0.0 out of 5 stars. 7 pc. SAE Ratcheting Combination Wrench Set.
From craftsman.com
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STANDARD & METRIC WRENCHES & WRENCH SETS | CRAFTSMAN

10 pc. 3/8 in. 12-Point Standard (SAE) Crowfoot Open-End Wrench Set. CMMT99436. 4.3. (37) 4.3 out of 5 stars. 37 reviews. 1/2-in. Drive Digital Torque Wrench. CMMT99435.
From craftsman.com
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CRAFTSMAN WRENCHES: STANDARD - SEARS

Going beyond standard wrench sets Experienced craftsmen and homeowners alike will appreciate the versatility of a comprehensive wrench set from Sears. Instead of modifying your adjustable wrench for a project that requires multiple sizes, simply select the appropriate ratcheting, flare nut , angle , box or combination wrenches from the case and get to work.
From sears.com
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CRAFTSMAN RATCHETING WRENCH SET | 8 YEAR REVIEW - YOUTUBE

2018-04-25  · Craftsman 20 piece ratcheting wrench set review of how they’ve stood up to 8 years of abuse, I mean use. This craftsman ratcheting wrench set has been used i...
From youtube.com
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CRAFTSMAN RATCHETING WRENCH SET | EBAY

1 product rating - Craftsman Ratcheting Box-end Wrench Set 5-piece Made In USA . C $69.72. Top Rated Seller Top Rated Seller. or Best Offer +C $33.82 shipping estimate. from United States. X Z S p o n N s o F r 0 S e J d O X. Craftsman Offset MM Ratcheting Box-End Wrench Set 12 pt USA - 5 pcs (p/n 43376) New (Other) 5.0 out of 5 stars. 5 product ratings - Craftsman Offset MM Ratcheting Box-End ...
From ebay.ca
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CRAFTSMAN RATCHET WRENCHES & SETS AT LOWES.COM

8. CRAFTSMAN. 11-Piece Set 12-Point Metric Ratchet Wrench Set. Model # CMMT87021. Find My Store. for pricing and availability. 4. CRAFTSMAN. 7-Piece Set 12-Point Metric Flexible Head Ratchet Wrench Set.
From lowes.com
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CRAFTSMAN RATCHETING WRENCHES & SETS: STANDARD - SEARS

Keep a ratchet wrench set handy for home repairs. Make repairs around the house simpler with new ratchet wrenches. These efficient tools make it easy to quickly switch between jobs by incorporating a standard wrench head as well as a ratcheting box end. Tune up a bicycle that's been in storage for the winter with the open end and loosen ...
From sears.com
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7 PC. SAE RATCHETING COMBINATION WRENCH SET - CRAFTSMAN

SAE Ratcheting Combination Wrench Set - CMMT12056 | CRAFTSMAN close. Email Address* ... SAE Ratcheting Combination Wrench Set offers a number of applications from the standard bolt turning to working on specific automotive repairs. SHOP NOW. CMMT12056 Features . CORROSION RESISTANCE: Full Polish Chrome Finish; QUICK ENGAGEMENT: 12 Point Box End with fastener; …
From craftsman.com
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CRAFTSMAN COMBINATION WRENCHES & SETS: METRIC - SEARS

Craftsman 8-Piece Ratcheting Wrench Set - Metric (120) Sold by Sears. add to compare compare now. $89.99 $69.99. Craftsman 7 pc. Metric Universal Flex Ratcheting Wrench Set (66) Sold by Sears. add to compare compare now. $124.99 $61.97. Craftsman 7 pc. Metric Locking Flex Ratcheting Combination Wrench Set (50) Sold by Sears. add to compare compare now. $27.98 $19.58. Craftsman …
From sears.com
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CRAFTSMAN STANDARD (SAE) RATCHET WRENCHES & SETS AT LOWES.COM

CRAFTSMAN. 11-Piece Set 12-Point Standard (SAE) Ratchet Wrench Set. Model # CMMT87022. Find My Store. for pricing and availability. 6. CRAFTSMAN. 7-Piece Set 12-Point Standard (SAE) Flexible Head Ratchet Wrench Set. Model # CMMT87010.
From lowes.com
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AMAZON.COM: CRAFTSMAN RATCHET WRENCHES

CRAFTSMAN Ratchet Wrench Set, SAE, 2-Piece with Ratcheting Box End (CMMT12073) 4.4 out of 5 stars 44. $39.98 $ 39. 98 $44.00 $44.00. Get it as soon as Tue, Oct 12. FREE Shipping by Amazon. CRAFTSMAN CMMT87009 7-Piece Metric Flex Reversible Ratchet Set. 4.8 out of 5 stars 36. $63.58 $ 63. 58. Get it as soon as Mon, Oct 11. FREE Shipping by Amazon. More Buying Choices $58.49 (3 …
From amazon.com
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CRAFTSMAN WRENCHES: STANDARD - SEARS

Get the Craftsman Wrenches sets you need to tackle the toughest jobs at Sears. Skip Navigation. Sears home ... Ratcheting Wrench. No. Refine Further: Wrench Sizing (72) Standard (34) Metric (1) Standard & metric (72) Standard (34) Metric (1) Standard & metric. Ratcheting Wrench (72) No (15) Yes (72) No (15) Yes. Set (68) Open Stock (4) Set (68) Open Stock (4) Set. Price (68) $0 - $25 (4) …
From sears.com
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CRAFTSMAN STANDARD LENGTH HAND SOCKET WRENCHES FOR SALE | EBAY

Get the best deal for Craftsman Standard Length Hand Socket Wrenches from the largest online selection at eBay.com. | Browse our daily deals for even more savings! | Free shipping on many items!
From ebay.ca
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CRAFTSMAN RATCHETING WRENCH | EBAY

New Listing Craftsman 20 pc Combination Ratcheting Wrench Set Metric MM & Standard SAE. Brand New. C $54.40. Buy It Now. Free shipping. from China. S C p o X n 9 C 9 W s o r e W 7 9 d J. New Craftsman 144 Position Ratcheting Wrench SAE or Metric choose 1 set or both . Brand New. C $84.56 to C $145.00. Top Rated Seller Top Rated Seller. Buy It Now +C $120.82 shipping. from United …
From ebay.ca
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AMAZON.COM: CRAFTSMAN UNIVERSAL WRENCH SET

Craftsman 10 Piece Standard Crowfoot Wrench Set, 9-4362. 4.7 out of 5 stars 64. Craftsman 8 pc Metric Combination Ratcheting Wrench Set, # 22985. 4.6 out of 5 stars 96. New Polished Craftsman 5 Pc Piece Standard Sae Tappet Wrench Set. 4.2 out of 5 stars 29. Craftsman Universal Combination Wrench Inch SAE (1/2) 4.7 out of 5 stars 21. $9.73 $ 9. 73. Get it as soon as Thu, Sep 16. FREE …
From amazon.com
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CRAFTSMAN TOOLS - USA HISTORY: RATCHET WRENCH SOCKETS ...

Welcome to the Craftsman USA Ratchet History Project!This video features the USA made Craftsman "Wrench Sockets" that were supposed to be mated to a ratcheti...
From youtube.com
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CRAFTSMAN 20-PIECE RATCHETING COMBINATION WRENCH SET ...

2014-09-10  · Loosen Up Whether you're working under the hood or under the sink, get the torque you need to finish the job with this Craftsman ratcheting combination wrench set. Combining 10 inch and 10 metric sizes, there's a wrench for whatever fastener lies ahead. The reinforced open ends and ratcheting ends give you the strength needed to bust stuck bolts and turn with minimal adjustments.
From shopyourway.com
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RATCHET WRENCHES & RATCHETING WRENCH SETS | CRAFTSMAN

7 pc. Metric Flex Head Ratchet Wrench Set. CMMT87026. 7 pc. SAE Stubby Ratcheting Wrench Set. CMMT87022. 11 pc. SAE Ratcheting Combination Wrench Set. CMMT87024.
From craftsman.com
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Sours: https://www.tfrecipes.com/craftsman-ratchet-wrench-set-standard/
Craftsman Ratcheting Reversible Combination Box Wrench Set Review

Ask The Saw Guy

Now, we’ll admit to be kind of splitting hairs here. Like we said earlier, we’re talking about ratchets - both Gearwrench and Craftsman offer an unlimited lifetime warranty on all their ratchets/wrenches/sockets, so they’re both the same in that regard.

Craftsman’s go-to ratchets, the 75-tooth full polish 3-piece set, are perfectly fine tools, and less than half the price of the Gearwrench set.

Like we said, personally we own and love the 120XP’s, but we don’t foresee any reason whatsoever why this standard Craftsman set wouldn’t serve you just fine. The single pawl, 75-tooth driver gear allows for a 5-degree swing - almost double that of the Gearwrench.

It’s very likely of course that you’ll be fine with a 5-degree ratchet, but if/when you’re in that spot where you can’t turn the gear, boy you’d be wishing you had the 120XP.

Our recommendation: Craftsman vs. Gearwrench

So, what’s our overall opinion - Craftsman vs. Gearwrench? Like we said a few times, we prefer Gearwrench.

However, if you’re looking for your first driver set, by all means save some money and go with the Craftsman - it’ll surely serve you just fine. Use the extra money to get yourself a nice socket set.

On the other hand, if you’re looking to upgrade your current set of ratchets, we highly recommend taking the step up to the Gearwrench 120XP. If you haven’t tried them already, you’ll love them. (Now, let’s pump the brakes here and drop a little disclaimer - we’re not claiming these things to be the best ratchets in the industry. If you’re looking to get yourself the absolute best, and happen to have a money tree out in your backyard, go with some Gedore’s or something).

Socket sets

Alright, if you’re getting yourself a ratchet set, unless you just plan on looking at them, you’ll need some sockets to go with it. Some people are particular about their sockets - we’re not. Again, we have no qualms about giving the advice to get yourself the cheapest set you can find.

It’s common knowledge that Craftsman sockets (like this decent little set here), don’t have as quality a finish as Gearwrench - the chrome plating can tend to be a little shabby, and is prone to flaking. How much of a concern this is is up to you. Just keep this in mind - at the end of the day, a flaked socket isn’t going to perform any less than a nice pretty shiny one. If you’re leaving your sockets out in the rain for days at a time or something, though, that’s a different story. Rust buildup is definitely bad. There’s an easy way around this, though: take care of your tools and don’t let them get rusty.

Socket sets are all about what you want. Ready to spend a couple hundred bucks and get yourself a massive, all-inclusive set? Go right ahead. Only want a small, standard/metric set with the most common sizes? An easy grab for less than about 40 bucks.

To keep a certain degree of aesthetics in the garage, (or maybe we’re just a little OCD?), we personally like to compliment our Gearwrench ratchets with Gearwrench sockets. They have some really nice value sets that come with the 120XP driver, for pretty reasonable prices. Definitely a recommended buy.

Again, however, if you’re looking to get yourself a decent socket/ratchet set without spending too much money, something like this 108-piece Craftsman will get you in the game and serve you just fine for a more than reasonable price.

Like we said - you’ll get slightly better sockets with a better quality finish/plating if you decide to go Gearwrench, but you’ll spend a bit more than if you were to choose Craftsman. It’s all up to you - the ball’s in your hand.

Sours: https://www.thesawguy.com/gearwrench-vs-craftsman/

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Okay, Tanya, I'll figure it out, - Sashka fished a cigarette pack out of his pocket, went out onto the balcony. a warm September night hung over the city. With a wink, the street lamps came on.



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