Gtx 1660 super msrp

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TODAY'S BEST DEALS

The Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Super is a fantastic card for budget gamers. It builds on the GTX 1660 to take the power up a notch. Yet, it offers that boost in performance while still staying in the budget graphics card range that makes a card like this so attractive. Essentially, you don’t have to spend much more for that extra bit of performance.

Finding that sweet spot of solid 1080p gaming for a reasonable price is not the easiest task for budget gamers. Most of the GPUs available these days are just too pricey. That’s where the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Super comes in. With its improved speed and video memory compared to the original 1660, it’s the perfect card for anyone building or taking their budget gaming PC to the next level.

The Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Super stands somewhere between the GTX 1660 and GTX 1660 Ti in terms of performance and price. As such, it’s a welcome part of the Nvidia Turing line up. Considering what it offers in terms of overall value, it might just be the best graphics card for you.

Price and availability

The Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Super is available today, starting at $229 (about £180, AU$330). This puts the GTX 1660 Super above the original GTX 1660 by just $10 (about £8, AU$15). But, with the faster GDDR6 memory, you're getting a significant boost in performance for that slight price increase. 

Plus, at this price point it kind of pushes the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Ti out of relevance. You can get similar performance with the GTX 1660 Super, but for $50 (about £40, AU$70) less. A few months ago, we would have recommended the GTX 1660 Ti without even giving a second thought, but with the GTX 1660 Super, that card doesn't really have a reason to exist anymore. 

Features and chipset

The Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Super is based on the same TU116 GPU as both the GTX 1660 and the GTX 1660 Ti, but has the same 1,408 CUDA cores as the original 1660.  The big difference over the original graphics card is the bump up to GDDR6 video memory, resulting in a boost in memory speed from 8Gbps to 14Gbps – that's just as fast as the VRAM in the massively powerful RTX 2080 Ti. 

This bump up to GDDR6 goes a long way to bridging the gap between the GTX 1660 and the GTX 1660 Ti, but it doesn't quite go all the way. 

And, it's also important to note that this GPU doesn't have the RT and Tensor cores that the RTX 20-series of Turing graphics cards have. This means that while you can technically enable ray tracing, it's going to turn whatever game you try to enable it on into a slideshow – more so than it does on any other graphics card. During our testing, we accidentally left ray tracing on in Metro Exodus, and even the menu was nigh-unusable. 

But, really, at the end of the day you can't expect a graphics card in this weight class to compete with graphics cards that cost twice as much. The GTX 1660 doesn't have RT cores, nor does the GTX 1660 Ti, so it only makes sense for the GTX 1660 Super to be limited here. 

One thing you should be aware of is that the ports are a bit limited on the GeForce GTX 1660 Super. We tested the EVGA GTX 1660 Super SC Ultra, and it's limited to DVI, HDMI and DisplayPort. This isn't exactly a graphics card that you're going to run 10 displays off of, but we would have liked to see Nvidia drop the DVI port and add in either a second HDMI or maybe even a USB-C port. 

Finally, if you do pick this graphics card up, you will need external power to make it run, in this case an 8-pin PCIe power connector. This means that the GTX 1660 Super does draw 127.4W alone in the most taxing situations, so you should make sure you have at least a 500W power supply. 

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Performance

Frankly, the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Super is one hell of a graphics card, especially compared to its counterparts. In Time Spy, the GTX 1660 Super was about 5% slower than the GTX 1660 Ti that costs significantly more, and was a whopping 14% faster than the GTX 1660 that it essentially replaces. In Fire Strike, the difference was even more narrow – its just 2% slower than the GTX 1660 Ti. 

These performance wins continued over into gaming, too. In Metro Exodus at 1080p, the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Super averaged 41 frames per second (fps), compared to the 38 scored by the vanilla GTX 1660 and the 44 scored by the 1660 Ti. That might look like a marginal performance difference, but it still matters. 

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Sours: https://www.techradar.com/reviews/nvidia-geforce-gtx-1660-super

Should I buy an Nvidia GeForce GTX Super?

The RTX may be a phenomenal GPU, but it's still an incredibly expensive card. If your budget is a lot tighter, should you be eyeing up the GeForce GTX Super instead? And if yes, what sort of cash should you be looking at?

With Amazon Prime Day and Black Friday weekend imminent, you'll soon find yourself checking whether you've budgeted for a system upgrade, and if you're gaming at p, then there's a lot to like about this value-oriented card. If the price is right, it can potentially offer the kind of bang for your buck that Ampere simply can't right now.

We are waiting on new cards from AMD and the rest of Nvidia's Ampere stack should make an appearance either at the end of this year, or at the start of the next. Even so they're all going to be more-expensive offerings—we don't expect to see any challengers for budget graphics cards any time soon.

What is the Nvidia GeForce GTX Super?

GeForce GTX Super Specs

Release date - October
GPU - Turing TU
Lithography - 12nm
CUDA cores - 1,
Base clock - 1, MHz
Boost clock - MHz
Memory capacity - 6GB GDDR6
Launch price - $

The Nvidia GTX Super is the best series card in Nvidia's Turing line-up, being ever so slightly slower ( percent) than the GTX Ti, but offering much better bang for your buck in the process. With 6GB of GDDR6, it is well-equipped to handle the games of tomorrow as well. 

You're going to be able to run most games at Ultra settings and still hit smooth frame rates at p. You may even be able to drive a p panel with this card if you're ok turning down some of the more exacting settings. 

What are the alternatives to the Nvidia GeForce GTX Super?

This end of the graphics card market is packed with great value GPUs, and if your budget can stretch a little further, then the AMD Radeon XT is a worthy consideration. That card is going to be much more capable of driving a p if that's what you've got in mind.

Alternatively if you want to get in on the ray tracing game, then the RTX super is the most affordable way of doing that, although even now such cards certainly are not cheap. We are expecting the RTX to drop at some point too, so it's probably worth holding off if this is your goal. 

Should I buy the Nvidia GeForce GTX Super and at what price?

The big graphics cards released this year have all been at the top end of the market, which means that not a lot has changed at this more-affordable level. In that context the Super is still an incredible value proposition if you're looking to game at p with the setting maxed, or close to. It's still a card definitely worth buying. 

As for the price, various GTX Super cards can be picked up for around $ (which is slightly more than they launched at), although stock is still tight, so you may need to shop around a bit for specific models. Prices have been as low as $ over the last year, so anything close to that would make sense. We don't imagine they'll hit $ even at the height of the sales though—if they do, grab one. 

Alan has been writing about PC tech since before 3D graphics cards existed, and still vividly recalls having to fight with MS-DOS just to get games to load. He fondly remembers the killer combo of a Matrox Millenium and 3dfx Voodoo, and seeing Lara Croft in 3D for the first time. He's very glad hardware has advanced as much as it has though, and is particularly happy when putting the latest M.2 NVMe SSDs, AMD processors, and laptops through their paces. He has a long-lasting Magic: The Gathering obsession but limits this to MTG Arena these days.

Sours: https://www.pcgamer.com/should-i-buy-nvidia-geforce-gtxsuper/
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Should I buy an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Super?

The RTX 3080 may be a phenomenal GPU, but it's still an incredibly expensive card. If your budget is a lot tighter, should you be eyeing up the GeForce GTX 1660 Super instead? And if yes, what sort of cash should you be looking at?

With Amazon Prime Day and Black Friday weekend imminent, you'll soon find yourself checking whether you've budgeted for a system upgrade, and if you're gaming at 1080p, then there's a lot to like about this value-oriented card. If the price is right, it can potentially offer the kind of bang for your buck that Ampere simply can't right now.

We are waiting on new cards from AMD and the rest of Nvidia's Ampere stack should make an appearance either at the end of this year, or at the start of the next. Even so they're all going to be more-expensive offerings—we don't expect to see any challengers for budget graphics cards any time soon.

What is the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Super?

GeForce GTX 1660 Super Specs

Release date - October 2019
GPU - Turing TU116
Lithography - 12nm
CUDA cores - 1,408
Base clock - 1,530 MHz
Boost clock - 1785 MHz
Memory capacity - 6GB GDDR6
Launch price - $229

The Nvidia GTX 1660 Super is the best 16-series card in Nvidia's Turing line-up, being ever so slightly slower (3-5 percent) than the GTX 1660 Ti, but offering much better bang for your buck in the process. With 6GB of GDDR6, it is well-equipped to handle the games of tomorrow as well. 

You're going to be able to run most games at Ultra settings and still hit smooth frame rates at 1080p. You may even be able to drive a 1440p panel with this card if you're ok turning down some of the more exacting settings. 

What are the alternatives to the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Super?

This end of the graphics card market is packed with great value GPUs, and if your budget can stretch a little further, then the AMD Radeon 5600 XT is a worthy consideration. That card is going to be much more capable of driving a 1440p if that's what you've got in mind.

Alternatively if you want to get in on the ray tracing game, then the RTX 2060 super is the most affordable way of doing that, although even now such cards certainly are not cheap. We are expecting the RTX 3060 to drop at some point too, so it's probably worth holding off if this is your goal. 

Should I buy the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Super and at what price?

The big graphics cards released this year have all been at the top end of the market, which means that not a lot has changed at this more-affordable level. In that context the 1660 Super is still an incredible value proposition if you're looking to game at 1080p with the setting maxed, or close to. It's still a card definitely worth buying. 

As for the price, various GTX 1660 Super cards can be picked up for around $240 (which is slightly more than they launched at), although stock is still tight, so you may need to shop around a bit for specific models. Prices have been as low as $220 over the last year, so anything close to that would make sense. We don't imagine they'll hit $200 even at the height of the sales though—if they do, grab one. 

Alan has spent far too much of his life in World of Warcraft and playing Magic the Gathering to be a normal human being, which is why he has retreated to the warm embrace of gaming hardware. 

Sours: https://www.pcgamer.com/should-i-buy-nvidia-geforce-gtx-1660-super/
GTX 1660 Super Tear-Downs: 9mm of Thermal Pads \u0026 Bendy Backplates

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Our Verdict

The Nvidia GeForce GTX Super is a superstar in the entry-level graphics card market. Not only does it overcome the original GTX , it all but matches the GTX Ti, making that more expensive card almost irrelevant in comparison.

For

  • Affordable
  • Excellent performance
  • Doesn't get too hot

Against

  • No RT cores
  • Limited ports

TODAY'S BEST DEALS

The Nvidia GeForce GTX Super is a fantastic card for budget gamers. It builds on the GTX to take the power up a notch. Yet, it offers that boost in performance while still staying in the budget graphics card range that makes a card like this so attractive. Essentially, you don’t have to spend much more for that extra bit of performance.

Finding that sweet spot of solid p gaming for a reasonable price is not the easiest task for budget gamers. Most of the GPUs available these days are just too pricey. That’s where the Nvidia GeForce GTX Super comes in. With its improved speed and video memory compared to the original , it’s the perfect card for anyone building or taking their budget gaming PC to the next level.

The Nvidia GeForce GTX Super stands somewhere between the GTX and GTX Ti in terms of performance and price. As such, it’s a welcome part of the Nvidia Turing line up. Considering what it offers in terms of overall value, it might just be the best graphics card for you.

Price and availability

The Nvidia GeForce GTX Super is available today, starting at $ (about £, AU$). This puts the GTX Super above the original GTX by just $10 (about £8, AU$15). But, with the faster GDDR6 memory, you're getting a significant boost in performance for that slight price increase. 

Plus, at this price point it kind of pushes the Nvidia GeForce GTX Ti out of relevance. You can get similar performance with the GTX Super, but for $50 (about £40, AU$70) less. A few months ago, we would have recommended the GTX Ti without even giving a second thought, but with the GTX Super, that card doesn't really have a reason to exist anymore. 

Features and chipset

The Nvidia GeForce GTX Super is based on the same TU GPU as both the GTX and the GTX Ti, but has the same 1, CUDA cores as the original  The big difference over the original graphics card is the bump up to GDDR6 video memory, resulting in a boost in memory speed from 8Gbps to 14Gbps – that's just as fast as the VRAM in the massively powerful RTX Ti. 

This bump up to GDDR6 goes a long way to bridging the gap between the GTX and the GTX Ti, but it doesn't quite go all the way. 

And, it's also important to note that this GPU doesn't have the RT and Tensor cores that the RTX series of Turing graphics cards have. This means that while you can technically enable ray tracing, it's going to turn whatever game you try to enable it on into a slideshow – more so than it does on any other graphics card. During our testing, we accidentally left ray tracing on in Metro Exodus, and even the menu was nigh-unusable. 

But, really, at the end of the day you can't expect a graphics card in this weight class to compete with graphics cards that cost twice as much. The GTX doesn't have RT cores, nor does the GTX Ti, so it only makes sense for the GTX Super to be limited here. 

One thing you should be aware of is that the ports are a bit limited on the GeForce GTX Super. We tested the EVGA GTX Super SC Ultra, and it's limited to DVI, HDMI and DisplayPort. This isn't exactly a graphics card that you're going to run 10 displays off of, but we would have liked to see Nvidia drop the DVI port and add in either a second HDMI or maybe even a USB-C port. 

Finally, if you do pick this graphics card up, you will need external power to make it run, in this case an 8-pin PCIe power connector. This means that the GTX Super does draw W alone in the most taxing situations, so you should make sure you have at least a W power supply. 

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Performance

Frankly, the Nvidia GeForce GTX Super is one hell of a graphics card, especially compared to its counterparts. In Time Spy, the GTX Super was about 5% slower than the GTX Ti that costs significantly more, and was a whopping 14% faster than the GTX that it essentially replaces. In Fire Strike, the difference was even more narrow – its just 2% slower than the GTX Ti. 

These performance wins continued over into gaming, too. In Metro Exodus at p, the Nvidia GeForce GTX Super averaged 41 frames per second (fps), compared to the 38 scored by the vanilla GTX and the 44 scored by the Ti. That might look like a marginal performance difference, but it still matters. 

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Sours: https://www.techradar.com/reviews/nvidia-geforce-gtxsuper

Super gtx msrp 1660

Earlier this year, Nvidia launched its new GTX series with the GTX Ti, GTX , and GTX seeking to join the ranks of the best graphics cards. The lack of ray tracing hardware is an interesting change after last years RTX series, but it does make sense for the mid-range and lower markets. When Nvidia refreshed the RTX lineup with the Super models, I didn't expect to see that extend into the GTX range, yet here we are. The GTX Super is a thing that now exists, leveraging the same Turing architecture and TU GPU, but it certainly leaves me scratching my head. All in the name of competition I suppose.

I'm not saying the card is bad by any means, but it ends up overlapping the GTX Ti in many respects. It still has the GPU core counts and clockspeeds of the vanilla GTX , but now it gets GDDR6 memory—which was one of the primary differentiators between the and Ti. Even more curious, the GDDR6 memory is clocked at 14Gbps compared to the 12Gbps speed on the Ti. Basically, it's weird to have a lower tier card that's both better and worse than an existing higher tier card. At least the price is lower, which brings me to the official specs overview.

The main specifications are no surprise. It's the same TU GPU, still with 22 SMs enabled (out of potentially 24 SMs), now with 14Gbps GDDR6. I questioned the lack of 14Gbps GDDR6 on the Ti when it came out, and assumed it was mostly because it wasn't really necessary, but it would have made a lot more sense to equip that card with faster VRAM and then have the Super use 12Gbps. That's not how things played out, however, and now we end up with an even more crowded budget to mid-range set of Nvidia offerings.

It's important to note that the Super (and Super) are intended to coexist with the other GTX series GPUs, rather than replacing anything. That means Nvidia now has five GTX series parts instead of three. I've included what we know of the GTX Super in the table as well, plus the and Super to show what you get with the next level above the GTX cards. It's worth pointing out that the also uses TU now—it was necessary to use the larger die in order to get the improved NVENC hardware, since Nvidia didn't include that in TU

There's a reason for these new GTX Super cards, of course, and that reason is AMD. Specifically, AMD recently launched the OEM version of the Radeon RX , and consumer models are expected to arrive shortly. Combined with prices dropping over the past six months on the existing RX cards and it seems Nvidia wants to improve the way its cards stack up against AMD's current and future offerings. At least that's how I see things; I'm sure Nvidia would say this was always the plan.

If you already have a GTX , Ti, or , you're not going to want to bother downgrading to the Super.

The other interesting aspect about the GTX series is the lack of hardware ray tracing features. There's driver support for DirectX Raytracing (DXR), but generally speaking you won't get much above 30 fps even at p with the GTX models. With the RTX now starting at around $ (and I've seen sales drop the price as low as $), the GTX Ti is in a tough spot. I'd almost always encourage gamers to upgrade to the RTX over the Ti, since it's only about $50 more. With the Super price of $, that's a big enough jump that the Super feels like a viable option.

There's still the problem of the previous generation cards, as well as the existing cards. Most of Nvidia's GTX series parts are only available second-hand these days, but if you already have a GTX , Ti, or , you're not going to want to bother downgrading to the Super. The same goes for AMD graphics cards at the Vega 56 level or higher. The current generation mid-range end up competing against the previous generation mid-range and high-end GPUs, and usually they're not able to surpass the latter.

Meanwhile, official prices on most of Nvidia's Turing cards are about 10 percent higher than street prices, so a $ Super is only $20 less than the cheapest GTX Ti. With Black Friday deals looming on the horizon, I expect we'll see some GTX Ti cards actually drop below the newly released GTX Super. Hopefully it's pretty obvious that the Ti is generally the better card if pricing is anywhere close to equal. And if you're worried about the 12Gbps GDDR6 compared to 14Gbps on the Super, don't—the Ti cards I've tested can all overclock the VRAM to 14Gbps (and often 15Gbps).

Meet the EVGA GTX Super Ultra SC

That sets the stage for our benchmarks and analysis of the GTX Super. For this review, Nvidia shipped me the EVGA GTX Super Ultra SC, which means it comes with a modest factory overclock. Specifically, it has a boost clock of MHz compared to the reference clock of MHz. That boosts performance a few percent in practice, and while you wouldn't normally notice the difference while playing games, it will certainly show up in the benchmarks.

This EVGA is a pretty standard design, with dual cooling fans and a modest heatsink. With a rated TDP of W, there's no real need for an extravagant cooling solution, and jacking up the price runs counter to the whole concept of a mid-range offering. Instead of spending an extra $$50 on better cooling and a higher factory overclock, it's better to just move up to the next performance tier—the GTX Ti in this case. The downside is that the card isn't particularly quiet, measuring 60 dB(A) under load from a distance of 5cm, but that keeps the GPU at a relatively chill maximum core temperature of 74C.

For comparison, a Sapphire RX Pulse only measured 45 dB(A) in the same test conditions, and even an RX XT reference card only hit 57 dB(A). The XT also runs about 10C hotter, leveling off at 84C. The reason for the higher noise levels is pretty simple: EVGA isn't using a particularly robust heatsink, relying instead on fan speeds and airflow to keep the card cool. Even though the Super uses less than half the power of a Ti, with a smaller heatsink and no heatpipes it ends up generating a decent amount of noise.

Test Setup

Most of the other cards are reference clocked models, though the RTX , , and Ti are Founders Edition cards that also have a 90MHz factory overclock. AMD's RX , , and cards are likewise factory overclocked models, but I don't normally consider differences of less than 5 percent to be particularly meaningful when comparing performance.

I continue to use my standard GPU testbed from about two years ago, with a Core iK overclocked to GHz to ensure the CPU isn't a bottleneck in testing. In a few instances an iK or iK might be fractionally faster in games, but typically the difference is less than a few percent—even less at p and 4K, and also less when looking at mid-range graphics solutions like the Super. The PC also uses fast DDR CL14 G.Skill memory and SSD storage to ensure the GPU is the limiting factor in performance (as much as possible).

I'm using Nvidia's pre-release drivers on the GTX Super, and I've spot-checked other Nvidia cards to ensure there are no anomalies. Most of the results are about the same, but several games—and Forza Horizon 4 in particular—required retesting with the latest drivers. The AMD GPU results are current as of , with slightly newer drivers used in The Outer Worlds.

GeForce GTX Super gaming performance

In keeping with my tradition of adding newer games to the test suite as they become available (and meaningful), I've updated the list since the Sapphire RX review. Specifically, I dropped Fortnite and added The Outer Worlds, mostly because Fortnite continues to change so frequently that establishing and maintaining a useful benchmark is nearly impossible. This provides a look at performance in recent releases as well as some popular but slightly older games, with the oldest game on the list right now being Total War: Warhammer 2 from late

The 11 games I'm testing include a pretty even mix of AMD and Nvidia promoted titles, currently with more AMD promoted games. DirectX 12 is utilized in most cases if it's available, though I tested Borderlands 3 in DX11 mode, and Total War: Warhammer 2 in DX11 on Nvidia GPUs. In both cases, that's because the DX11 solution performed better.

Each card is tested at four settings: p medium or equivalent, and p/p/4k ultra unless otherwise noted. For the charts below, I'm including the 4K gaming results mostly so you can see how the other GPUs perform, as no one buying a GTX Super should even be thinking about 4K ultra. Every setting is tested multiple times to ensure the consistency of the results, and I use the best score. Minimum FPS is calculated by summing all frametimes above the 97 percentile and dividing by the number of frames, so that it gives a reasonable representation of the lower end of the performance scale, rather than looking only at the single worst framerate from a benchmark run.

Here are the gaming performance results for the EVGA GTX Super SC Ultra.

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Sours: https://www.pcgamer.com/nvidia-geforce-gtxsuper-review/
NVIDIA, I retract my apology. - GTX 1660 Super Review

Price history for Gigabyte GeForce GTX SUPER OC 6G

Wednesday, October 27, JACOB▼Saturday, October 23, JACOB▲Thursday, October 21, JACOB▲Tuesday, October 19, JACOB▲Thursday, October 14, JACOB▼Sunday, September 26, JACOB▼Friday, September 24, JACOB
Sours: https://pangoly.com/en/price-history/gigabyte-geforce-gtxsuper-oc-6g

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For money in front of some perverts. - By the way, here is your money - Olga held out an envelope. Irina took it reluctantly. A prostitute. So she earned the first money with her body.



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