Mexican mafia san antonio

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Justice News

In San Antonio, federal, state and local authorities have arrested twelve Texas Mexican Mafia (TMM) members and associates on federal drug charges in connection with a methamphetamine/heroin/cocaine trafficking operation in the San Antonio area, announced U.S. Attorney John F. Bash; Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Special Agent in Charge Steven S. Whipple, Houston Division; San Antonio Police Chief William McManus; and, Bexar County Sheriff Javier Salazar.

A federal grand jury this week returned an eight–count indictment against all twelve defendants (listed below) -- ten who were arrested today and two who were already in custody prior to today.  Charges alleged in the indictment include: conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance; possession with intent to distribute a controlled substance; and, possession of a firearm by a convicted felon. 

The indictment alleges that the defendants are responsible for distributing controlled substances from July 2020 to September 23, 2020.

During today’s arrests, authorities seized a total of 15 firearms, approximately 20 kilograms of suspected methamphetamine, quantities of cocaine and an undetermined amount of U.S. currency.  Prior to today, this operation has resulted in the seizure of approximately 20 kilograms of methamphetamine, two kilograms of heroin and 18 firearms.

The defendants, with the exception of Vonallman, face lengthy mandatory federal prison terms upon conviction.   All of the defendants remain in custody awaiting detention hearings in federal court beginning next week.

“The arrests made as part of Operation Last Dance in San Antonio and the surrounding areas conclude a comprehensive investigation by DEA and our law enforcement partners into the criminal activities of violent local street gangs to include members of the Mexican Mafia, Texas Syndicate, and their criminal associates,” said DEA Special Agent in Charge Steven S. Whipple, Houston Field Division. “This investigation reflects DEA’s commitment to make sure communities across Texas are safe and prevent gang members involved in drug distribution and other violent criminal activity from establishing a foothold in our neighborhoods.”

This indictment resulted from an Texas Anti-Gang Center (TAG) investigation conducted by San Antonio TAG member agencies including the DEA, FBI, San Antonio Police Department’s Gang Unit, Bexar County Sheriff’s Department, Bexar County District Attorney’s Office, Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS), Texas Department of Criminal Justice-Office of Inspector General, Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), U.S. Marshals Service (USMS), and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF).

The purpose of the TAG Center in San Antonio is to provide a one-stop information sharing environment for federal, state and local law enforcement to combat and target gang violence in and around San Antonio. The goal is to disrupt the command and control of criminal gangs through prevention, intervention and suppression of their unlawful enterprises.

It is important to note that an indictment is merely a charge and should not be considered as evidence of guilt.  The defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

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Name, Age, Residence, Statutory sentence

Donald Trevino (aka “Fluffy”, “D”, “Uno”, “Gordo”), 32, San Antonio, 25 years to life imprisonment
Rodolfo Villalobos (aka “Fluffy”, “Chubs”, “Oro”), 38, San Antonio, 15 years to life imprisonment 
David Botello (aka “Torito”, “Bully”, “Bullyman”), 50, San Antonio, 15 years to life imprisonment
David Cortez Jr. (aka “Tazmanian”, “Taz”), 29, San Antonio, 10 years to life imprisonment
Moses Chavez (aka “Moe”, “Mighty Mouse”), 40, San Antonio, 10 years to life imprisonment
**Nicholas Neaves (aka “Snoopster”, “Snoop”), 25, San Antonio, 10 years to life imprisonment
Richard Agueros, III (aka “Herc”), 36, San Antonio, 10 years to life imprisonment
Robert Arzola Jr., 41, San Antonio, 10 years to life imprisonment
**Luz Del Carmen Velarde-Campos (aka “Prima”), 33, San Antonio, 10 years to life imprisonment
Aaron Muniz (aka “Primo”), 36, San Antonio, 10 years to life imprisonment
Isabel Hernandez-Garcia, 35, San Antonio, 0 years to life imprisonment
Joseph Lloyd Vonallman (aka “Jv”), 36, San Antonio, up to 20 years imprisonment

**   Already in custody prior to today

The year 2020 marks the 150th anniversary of the Department of Justice.  Learn more about the history of our agency at www.Justice.gov/Celebrating150Years.

Sours: https://www.justice.gov/usao-wdtx/pr/twelve-san-antonio-based-texas-mexican-mafia-members-and-associates-arrested-indicted

12 purported Mexican-Mafia members arrested on federal drug charges

SAN ANTONIO – Twelve purported members of the Mexican Mafia were arrested Friday in San Antonio, federal officials said.

According to a news release, the suspects face federal drug charges in connection with a trafficking operation involving methamphetamine, heroin, cocaine in the San Antonio area.

During the raids, authorities seized 15 firearms, about 20 kilograms of methamphetamine, cocaine and an undetermined amount of cash, officials said. Ten of the suspects were arrested Friday and two others were already in custody.

The arrests come after a federal grand jury this week indicted the suspects on various drug charges in connection with the operation that authorities dubbed “Operation Last Dance” that ran from July to September, officials said.

The indictments resulted from an investigation by the Drug Enforcement Administration and various local law enforcement agencies.

Following are the suspects, all from San Antonio, arrested and how much prison time they face if found guilty:

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  • Donald Trevino (aka “Fluffy”, "D", “Uno”, “Gordo”), 32 years old, 25 years to life imprisonment

  • Rodolfo Villalobos (aka “Fluffy”, “Chubs”, “Oro”), 38 years old, 15 years to life imprisonment

  • David Botello (aka “Torito”, “Bully”, “Bullyman”), 50 years old, 15 years to life imprisonment

  • David Cortez Jr. (aka “Tazmanian”, “Taz”), 29 years old, 10 years to life imprisonment

  • Moses Chavez (aka “Moe”, “Mighty Mouse”), 40 years old, 10 years to life imprisonment

  • Nicholas Neaves (aka “Snoopster”, “Snoop”), 25 years old, 10 years to life imprisonment

  • Richard Agueros, III (aka “Herc”), 36 years old, 10 years to life imprisonment

  • Robert Arzola Jr., 41 years old, 10 years to life imprisonment

  • Luz Del Carmen Velarde-Campos (aka “Prima”), 33 years old, 10 years to life imprisonment

  • Aaron Muniz (aka “Primo”), 36 years old, 10 years to life imprisonment

  • Isabel Hernandez-Garcia, 35 years old, 10 years to life imprisonment

  • Joseph Lloyd Vonallman (aka “Jv”), 36 years old, up to 20 years imprisonment

Copyright 2020 by KSAT - All rights reserved.


Sours: https://www.ksat.com/news/local/2020/10/02/12-purported-mexican-mafia-members-arrested-on-federal-drug-charges/
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Mexikanemi

Mexican-American prison and street gang

Mexikanemi, also known as the Texas Mexican Mafia, is a Mexican-American prison and street gang established in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice in 1984.[4][2] It functions separately from the original California Mexican Mafia, and members consider themselves primarily tied to the area of Aztlán, formerly Mexican territories in the southwestern United States.[5][6] The group engages in a wide range of illegal activities including drug trafficking, loan sharking, and money laundering.[7][8]

Overview[edit]

The structure, rules, and procedures of the Mexikanemi are formalized through their written constitution.[9] As stated therein, "everything will be organized because we are an organization".

Hierarchy[edit]

The hierarchy of the group begins with the president and vice president and then proceeds through general, captain, lieutenant, and sergeant. All other members not occupying one of these posts are considered soldiers. All others who are not members are prospects in the process of being adopted into the group as a member.

President through captain functions as a ranking system, wherein the title is attached to the individual and follows the individual in all their doings. However, lieutenant and sergeant are posts, which is to say that they are attached to geographical locations such as cities, ranches, buildings or institutions and remain with that location regardless of where the individual may go. When the individual leaves that location they no longer retain their title unless they then assume the same position at a different location.

The posts of sergeant and lieutenant are semi-democratic/semi-merit positions. These posts are democratic in that they are filled and can be vacated, according to the constitution, by a simple majority vote of the group that is or will be led by that person. These posts are meritocratic in that they may also be vacated by decree made by any person who holds the rank of captain or higher. Any person who vacates a post through a vote of no confidence, or through removal by a person who holds the rank of captain or higher, may never hold any other post.

All members of the group, regardless of post or responsibility, are explicitly placed below the authority of the constitution and are considered fundamentally equal, "Above all else, we are all equal and it is necessary that we all participate to the best of our abilities to be able to advance and make progress through Mexikanemi".

Recruitment[edit]

The Mexikanami utilize a distributed recruitment system based on democratic vote and the approval authority of lieutenants. According to their constitution, any member in good standing may recommend someone as a prospect so long as they are ethnically Mexican. The prospect is then introduced to the leadership and membership of their area and begins the 120-day process of becoming a full member. During this process, the person recommending the prospect is responsible for educating and indoctrinating them into the group. They are also responsible for disciplining the prospect should it be necessary.

At 90 days, the lieutenant of the area begins a 30-day investigative process regarding the prospect to determine whether they are "good". At the end of this the group votes on whether the prospect shall be admitted as a full member. Any member who does not vote must provide a reason for abstaining.

Income[edit]

Mexikanemi is explicitly committed to gaining its revenue through any means possible. As the constitution states:

Being a criminal organization we work in any criminal aspect or interest for the benefit and advancement of Mexikanemi. we shall deal in drugs, contract killing, large scale robbery, gambling, weapons and in everything imaginable.

A considerable amount of funding comes into the organization through the means or extortion through a method referred to as "The Dime".[7] By the rule of "The Dime", all illicit activity taking place in the group's territory, even by non-members, is taxed at a rate of 10% which is to be given to the group. This rule is strictly enforced, for example, in 1999 Mexikanemi member Manuel Vasquez strangled a local cannabis dealer, Juanita Ybarra, to death with a phone cord for refusing to pay "The Dime." Vasquez would later receive the death penalty for the crime.

Emblems and tattoos[edit]

A Hand Tattoo Consisting of Three Dots

The Mexikanemi use a number of insignia to represent their affiliation.[7][10] Members are permitted but not required to receive tattoos indicating their membership in the gang.[9] At the most basic level is the word "Mexikanemi" itself or various abbreviations therefor. These include the letter M as a single letter or as a pair (i.e. MM for Mexican Mafia); the letters "eme" (Spanish for M), or the number 13 either in Arabic, Roman, or Aztec numerals (M is the 13th letter of the alphabet). The number 13 may also be represented in any number of graphical depictions combining one of something and three of something. For example, one dot under the left hand and three dots under the right hand.

A number of additional symbols stem from the group's cultural and ethnic heritage. Symbols such as the eagle or the serpent may be allusions to the Mexican flag. Additionally, as the group places emphasis on their pre-Spanish Aztec cultural heritage, a wide range of Aztec art, symbols, and architecture may be employed.

Investigations and prosecutions[edit]

2012 indictments[edit]

In 2012 numerous law enforcement agencies collaborated in an investigation that resulted in the arrest of 25 alleged members of the group including a local law enforcement officer, Michael Mares of the Onalaska, Texas police.[11] The indictment alleged that Mares conspired with the group to provide them with "hand guns, assault rifles, hand restraints and even internal police information",[12] and that the group as a whole was working to "traffic drugs and carry out other illegal gang business, including selling numerous assault rifles, and detonation cord".[11]

References[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexikanemi
KSAT-12 Reporter Marilyn Moritz recalls Mexican Mafia Massacre

San Antonio judge hands Texas Mexican Mafia general life without parole

A high-ranking member of the Texas Mexican Mafia was sentenced Tuesday to life in prison without parole for leading a criminal enterprise that put large quantities of drugs on San Antonio streets, committed home invasions and was involved in shootouts with those who defied the gang’s orders.

Raul Ramos, 54, who is also known as Alto and Naranjo, was general of the gang’s operations in the “free world,” which included a host of crimes aimed at controlling the streets in San Antonio, including collecting a 10-percent tax, known as the “dime,” on drug dealers who peddle on the group's turf.

Ramos was among 37 members and associates who were indicted on federal drug, gun and extortion charges in 2017 in one of the latest federal crackdowns on the gang. He pleaded guilty to conspiracy to conspiracy to interfere with commerce by threats or violence (extortion), conspiracy to traffic drugs and a firearm count.

“I sincerely apologize for my involvement in these charges I am being charged with,” the heavily tattooed Ramos told U.S. District Judge Xavier Rodriguez. “I take full responsibility.”

On ExpressNews.com:Texas Mexican Mafia members arrested in raids

Ramos’ lawyer, George Dombart, told the judge that federal authorities exaggerated his clients’ responsibility by piling on crimes committed by other members, even though Ramos took no part in them. Much of the two-hour hearing was spent arguing over how those crimes affected Ramos sentence.

Dombart said Ramos wound up in the prison system as a result of his background that included a broken home and drugs. Ramos has been in the prison system for nearly three decades — since 1990 — and joined the Mexican Mafia in 1991 because he had few options, Dombart told the judge.

Dombart asked for mercy, saying 20 years in prison would suffice.

“Once you’re in it, you’re kind of in it for life,” Dombart said. “There’s those burdens and pressures to continue that and not offend the people who are in charge of you. I don’t know what other choices and opportunities he would have had.”

FBI special agent Katherine Gutierrez testified that Ramos passed down orders for hits, instructions to add more dealers to the gang’s tax rolls, and for other crimes meant to further the interests of the Mexican Mafia.

For example, she said, Ramos passed down orders from the gang’s imprisoned No. 2 overall leader and one of its founders, Benito “Viejito” Alonzo, to kill Alonzo’s daughter-in-law, Teresa Alonzo.

Gutierrez said Alonzo believed the woman stole $80,000 she was supposed to be holding for him that were proceeds of the collection of the dime. Benito Alonzo is serving life in the Texas prison system for providing guns to Fred Gomez Carrasco, a drug kingpin who died after an 11-day standoff in 1974 at the Walls Unit prison in Huntsville.

Gutierrez said one attempt to shoot the woman failed. Teresa Alonzo was shot during a second attempt in 2017 but survived, and two prospects were granted membership in the Mexican Mafia for the attempted hit, Gutierrez said.

On ExpressNews.com:Testimony at San Antonio trial highlights inner workings of the Texas Mexican Mafia

According to Gutierrez, Ramos ordered members assigned to the four quadrants of San Antonio to add two more “tienditas” — slang for drug dealers — to their weekly dime collection.

During their investigation, the FBI and Texas Department of Public Safety seized a ledger that contained amounts totaling $862,000 from the 10 percent collections. The ledgers also showed how much went to leaders. Ramos received the largest cut in the free world, while the leaders in prison got larger amounts.

Some dealers resisted paying the tax, and Mexican Mafia members conducted home invasions to rob dealers of property or to force them to pay up, according to Gutierrez and prosecutors. Among the litany of criminal incidents listed in the 2017 indictment are shoot-outs the Texas Mexican Mafia had with the rival Tango Orejones over attempts by the Mexican Mafia to collect the dime.

Besides collecting the street tax, Mexican Mafia members themselves sold drugs — primarily heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine — and some of the narcotics were smuggled into jails or prisons for imprisoned members on orders from Ramos, according to Gutierrez.

In the course of this case, Assistant U.S. Attorney Russell Leachman told the judge, investigators “solved several murders” and argued that Ramos was “at the top of the heap” of helping instill fear in the community.

“The suggestion that 20 years is a fair and just sentence…for someone like that is way out of touch,” Leachman told the judge. “This man is still part of the organization that is ordering the murders of people.”

The judge gave Ramos 20 years for the extortion charge, life for the drug count, and 10 years for the gun charge, then ran the sentences concurrently.

Several of the 37 who were indicted in 2017 have already been sentenced for their roles, while at least two more are scheduled for sentencing this week.

Guillermo Contreras covers federal courts in San Antonio and international legal issues. Read him on our free site, mySA.com, and on our subscriber site, ExpressNews.com. | [email protected] | Twitter: @gmaninfedland

Sours: https://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local/article/Texas-Mexican-Mafia-general-to-be-sentenced-today-14500949.php

Mafia san antonio mexican

12 alleged associates of the Texas Mexican Mafia arrested in San Antonio on federal drug charges

On Friday, authorities seized 15 firearms, approximately 20 kilograms of suspected meth, cocaine and cash. The investigation — dubbed "Operation Last Dance" — had previously seized meth, two kilograms of heroin and 18 firearms.

On ExpressNews.com:Testimony at San Antonio trial highlights inner workings of the Texas Mexican Mafia

"The arrests made as part of Operation Last Dance in San Antonio and the surrounding areas conclude a comprehensive investigation by (the Drug Enforcement Administration) and our law enforcement partners into the criminal activities of violent local street gangs to include members of the Mexican Mafia, Texas Syndicate, and their criminal associates," said DEA Special Agent in Charge Steven S. Whipple.

Last year, testimony at a San Antonio trial highlighted the inner workings of the brutal prison gang that started in the mid-1980s.

This week, a federal grand jury returned an eight-count indictment against all 12 defendants. Ten were arrested Friday and two were already in custody. The indictment alleges they were responsible for dealing drugs from July to Sept. 23.

The charges include conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance, possession with intent to distribute a controlled substance and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon.

Each of the 12 defendants are San Antonio residents. Here are their potential prison terms if convicted:

Donald Trevino (aka “Fluffy,” “D,” “Uno,” “Gordo”), 32, 25 years to life imprisonment

Rodolfo Villalobos (aka “Fluffy,” “Chubs,” “Oro”), 38, 15 years to life imprisonment

David Botello (aka “Torito,” “Bully,” “Bullyman”), 50, 15 years to life imprisonment

David Cortez Jr. (aka “Tazmanian,” “Taz”), 29, 10 years to life imprisonment

Moses Chavez (aka “Moe,” “Mighty Mouse”), 40, 10 years to life imprisonment

Nicholas Neaves (aka “Snoopster,” “Snoop”), 25, 10 years to life imprisonment

Richard Agueros III (aka “Herc”), 36, 10 years to life imprisonment

Robert Arzola Jr., 41, 10 years to life imprisonment

Luz Del Carmen Velarde-Campos (aka “Prima”), 33, 10 years to life imprisonment

Aaron Muniz (aka “Primo”), 36, 10 years to life imprisonment

Isabel Hernandez-Garcia, 35, 0 years to life imprisonment

Joseph Lloyd Vonallman (aka “Jv”), 36, up to 20 years imprisonment

Sours: https://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local/article/12-alleged-associates-of-the-Texas-Mexican-Mafia-15621863.php
KSAT-12 Reporter Marilyn Moritz recalls Mexican Mafia Massacre

Leshka too, as it turned out. We go four, passed the security, everything is fine. On the first no, we climbed to the second. There was no one in the insta already. Walking on the second along the corridor, Dimka squeezed me and we periodically sucked.

Now discussing:

I asked again. Exactly. I'm cunning.



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